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Does anyone here know of a way a C++ ifstream's get pointer might get corrupted after a read() call? I'm seeing some truly bizarre behaviour that I'm at a loss to explain. For example (illustrative code, rather than what I'm actually running):

int main()
{
   // datafile.bin is a 2MB binary file...
   std::ifstream ifs( "datafile.bin", ios::binary );
   ifs.exceptions ( ifstream::eofbit | ifstream::failbit | ifstream::badbit );

   int data[100];

   std::istream::pos_type current_pos = ifs.tellg();
   // current_pos = 0, as you'd expect...

   ifs.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>(data), 100 * sizeof(int) );
   // throws no exception, so no error bits set...

   std::streamsize bytes_read = ifs.gcount();
   // gives 400, as you'd expect...

   current_pos = ifs.tellg();
   // current_pos = 0x1e1a or something similarly daft

   return 0;
}

My example shows an array read, but it's happened even when reading single values of built-in types; the get pointer before the read is correct, the gcount() call reports the correct number of bytes read, but afterwards the get pointer is completely screwy. This doesn't happen with every read() call - sometimes I get through bunches of them before one stuffs up. What could possibly be monkeying with the get pointer? Am I doing something profoundly stupid?

Any and all help greatly appreciated...

Simon

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how large is the file your are reading from? –  Claptrap Jun 23 '10 at 11:36
    
Hi Anders, The file's a couple of megs, and the reads are typically going wrong in the first couple of KB... –  SimonC Jun 23 '10 at 11:38
    
seems Ok, I pasted in your code into Visual studio 2010, the last tellg returned 400. Are you sure the file is closed? Do you have some other process writing in the file?Could be some sharing issue –  Claptrap Jun 23 '10 at 11:56
    
Yep, I'm sure the file is closed and that nothing else has a handle on it (I've verified this using process explorer). See also my response to Favonius below - this is illustrative rather than actual code. As I say in my question, I usually get through numerous successful read() calls before one screws up the get pointer, and it's not predictable which one will cause the goof. Apologies for not making this clearer in the question... –  SimonC Jun 23 '10 at 12:03
1  
Then show something short enough to be understandable but which reproduces the problem. Excepted that pos_type is not an integral type and so can have an internal representation not directly related to the position, your code isn't problematic. The problem is probably elsewhere. –  AProgrammer Jun 23 '10 at 12:14
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2 Answers

pos_type isn't an integral type but a class, I'd not try to try to interpret its representation. It is implicitly convertible to an integral type, but if you are looking at it in the debugger, you'll see the internal representation.

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Sure, yes - I'm looking at in in the debugger, so seeing the internal representation, and I'm cross-checking this with my file open in a hex editor as I go. The addresses I'm seeing all check out until suddenly ping! my get pointer is half way down the file despite ifs.gcount() reporting the correct number of bytes read. –  SimonC Jun 23 '10 at 12:01
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I tried running your code in VS 2008 on Vista machine, but did not get any error. I have modified your code a bit for printing on console.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   // datafile.bin is a 2MB binary file...
   std::ifstream ifs( "H_Line.bmp", ios::binary );
   ifs.exceptions ( ifstream::eofbit | ifstream::failbit | ifstream::badbit );

   int data[100];

   std::istream::pos_type current_pos = ifs.tellg();

   cout<<current_pos<<endl; // current_pos = 0, as mentioned


   ifs.read( reinterpret_cast<char*>(data), 100 * sizeof(int) );
   // throws no exception, so no error bits set...

   std::streamsize bytes_read = ifs.gcount();

   cout<<bytes_read<<endl; // gives 400, as you have mentioned

   current_pos = ifs.tellg();

   cout<<current_pos<<endl; // FOR ME IT IS GIVING 400


   return 0;
}

I have tested this on a BMP image file of size >20 MB

Could you please elaborate which machine/compiler you are using. Thanks

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to mark up code, just indent it by 4 characters, don't use <pre> html tags. –  AProgrammer Jun 23 '10 at 11:58
    
Sure, sorry, I should have made clear in the question that this was illustrative code rather than my actual code (which isn't particularly amenable to concise presentation here). FWIW my toolset is VS2010 running on Win7 Professional x64, configuration Win32|Debug. –  SimonC Jun 23 '10 at 11:59
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