Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Perforce is downloading files to the external hard-drive connected to my MacBookPro as writable ("777"). It's as if the "allwrite" option is set in my workspace, but it's not.

I thought Perforce was supposed to mark the files read-only until I check them out. Is there a setting somewhere I missed?

Rev. P4V/MACOSX104U/2009.2/236331 MacBookPro OSX 10.5.8

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

Is your external hard-drive formated as hfs+? If it's FAT32, it will be 777 anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it's FAT32. So Mac can't change permissions on a FAT32 drive? I formatted it FAT32 so I could read/write from both Mac and Win. –  CaptainQwyx Jun 23 '10 at 16:03
    
FAT32 just doesn't support permissions. It has no internal structure to store those information. To read/write HFS+ file system, you can install BootCamp 3.x in Windows. –  Jason Jun 23 '10 at 16:47
    
To be fair, FAT32 does support a subset of Unix-style permissions, namely the global read-only bit. Sounds to me like Mac does not properly translate the FAT32 read-only bit into the Unix-style permissions scheme. If the FAT32 read-only flag is set, permissions should appear as 555; if unset, 777. Not saying that they do, just that they should. –  Timbo Jun 30 '10 at 22:52
add comment

Have you checked if Windows thinks the files are read only after syncing with the Mac client?

Perforce does not like it when you access the same disk location from two different workspaces, nor the same workspace from two different hosts. This is because the server tracks the state of the files on the client; you're begging for your local store to lose synchronization with the depot.

What are you really trying to accomplish here?

I would recommend that you forget about FAT32; put your Windows workspace on an NTFS volume and your Mac workspace on an HFS+ volume. Submit & sync to share the data. Storage is cheap.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.