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Regex rx = new Regex(@"(?<!\\\\),");
String test = "OU=James\\, Brown,OU=Test,DC=Internal,DC=Net";

This works perfectly, but I want to understand it. I've been gooling without success. Can somebody give me a word or phrase that I can use to look this up and understand it.

I would have thought that it should be written like this:

 new Regex(@"(\\\\)?,");

I've seen the (?zzzzzz) syntax before. It's the <! part that I'm stumped by.

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3  
@Srinivas - he's got 6 questions. Nothing wrong with 0% for newer users. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 23 '10 at 15:58
    
The last edit truncated the question, currently it terminates with "syntax before. It's the" which isn't well formed :-) –  Francesco Jun 23 '10 at 15:59
1  
I might be wrong but I think because you use "@" symbol at the beginning of the string you only need two backslashes. –  Sergej Andrejev Jun 23 '10 at 16:04
    
Justin - thanks. I didn't realize that I was supposed to mark the accepted answers. –  Trey Carroll Jun 23 '10 at 19:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

(?<!…) is a negative look-behind assertion. In your regex

(?<!\\\\),

the , matches a comma obviously. The \\\\ matches 2 backslashes. Then (?<!\\\\), matches any commas not preceeded by 2 backslashes.

Therefore it will match the , before the OU and DC, but not between James and Brown:

OU=James\\, Brown,OU=Test,DC=Internal,DC=Net
                 ^       ^           ^
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The <! part indicates a negative lookbehind. The rest of the expression (just a comma) matches only if it's not preceded by a backslash (or two backslashes, depending on whether the title or the body of your question is the accurate one).

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