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Using the following two tables on SQL Server 2005, how would I write a query to return the First_Name, Last_Name, Order_Date and total amount of an order where any order line item amounts for any order (OD_Amount) are greater than 100.

Orders

Order_ID
First_Name
Last_Name
Order_Date

Order_Details

Order_Detail_ID
Order_ID
OD_Item_No
OD_Amount
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So to clarify - you want to include all orders (with all items) where any one individual item was greater then 100? And exclude all others (e.g. where perhaps the total order > 100, but the individual items where all < 100)? –  Chris Jun 23 '10 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

Something like this maybe?

Select 
  t1.Order_ID, First_Name, Last_Name, Order_Date, Sum(OD_Amount) as Order_Total
From
  Orders t1
Inner Join
  Order_Details t2
    on t1.Order_ID = t2.Order_ID
Where 
  t1.Order_Id in (Select Distinct Order_Id from Order_Details where OD_Amount > 100)
Group By
  t1.Order_ID, First_Name, Last_Name, Order_Date
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SELECT
    O.first_name,
    O.last_name,
    O.order_date,
    SUM(OD.amount)
FROM
    Orders O
INNER JOIN Order_Details OD ON OD.order_id = O.order_id
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT
    FROM
        Order_Details OD2
    WHERE
        OD2.order_id = O.order_id AND
        OD2.amount > 100
)
GROUP BY
    O.first_name,
    O.last_name,
    O.order_date
share|improve this answer
    
Quote OP: "..where any order line item amounts for any order (OD_Amount) are greater than 100..." –  OMG Ponies Jun 23 '10 at 16:16
    
Yes, that could mean that any ONE is greater than 100 or (how I interpreted it) it could mean pick any one of them and it will be greater than 100. That's why sample data and expected outcome is useful :) –  Tom H. Jun 23 '10 at 16:20
    
Where any one item ordered is greater than 100 is what was I was looking for. So, exclude any orders that doesn't have an item over 100 in the order. Does that clarify? –  Clint Jun 23 '10 at 16:40
    
I've changed it to match that –  Tom H. Jun 23 '10 at 16:58

This is when you want each individual detail order to be greater than 100

SELECT t1.First_Name, t1.Last_Name, t1.Order_Date, SUM(t2.OD_Amount) AS 'totalAmount'
FROM Orders AS t1
JOIN Order_Details AS t2 ON t1.Order_ID = t2.Order_ID
WHERE t2.OD_Amount > 100
GROUP BY t1.First_Name, t1.Last_Name, t1.Order_Date

If you wanted each order itself to be over 100 then:

SELECT t1.First_Name, t1.Last_Name, t1.Order_Date, SUM(t2.OD_Amount) AS 'totalAmount'
FROM Orders AS t1
JOIN Order_Details AS t2 ON t1.Order_ID = t2.Order_ID    
GROUP BY t1.First_Name, t1.Last_Name, t1.Order_Date
HAVING SUM(t2.OD_Amount) > 100
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Forgot the GROUP BY ;) –  OMG Ponies Jun 23 '10 at 16:12
1  
This will also eliminate the items with amount < 100 from the SUM() –  Tom H. Jun 23 '10 at 16:13
    
And you can't have aggregates in the WHERE -- needs to be in a HAVING clause. –  OMG Ponies Jun 23 '10 at 16:15

I believe this is what you're looking for:

SELECT o.First_Name, o.Last_Name, sum(od.OD_Amount) As Order_Total_Amount FROM Order_Details AS od, Orders AS o WHERE o.Order_ID = od.Order_ID AND o.OrderID IN (SELECT Order_ID FROM Order_Details WHERE OD_Amount > 100) GROUP BY o.First_Name, o.Last_Name
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I believe this is what you are looking for. The EXISTS clause limits the results to only orders that have a single line item > 100. The GROUP BY accounts for multiple orders placed on the same day by including the Order_ID column.

SELECT
  o.First_Name
 ,o.Last_Name
 ,o.Order_Date
 ,SUM(od.OD_Amount) AS Total_Amount
FROM Orders o
  INNER JOIN Order_Details od ON od.Order_ID = o.Order_ID
WHERE EXISTS(SELECT *
             FROM Order_Details od2
             WHERE od2.OD_Amount > 100
               AND od2.Order_ID = o.Order_ID)
GROUP BY
  o.Order_ID
 ,o.First_Name
 ,o.Last_Name
 ,o.Order_Date
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