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I have a many to many table setup in my mysql database. Teams can be in many games and each game has 2 teams. There is a table in between them called teams_games. SHOW CREATE TABLE information follows.

I have been messing with this query for a while. At this point I don't care if it requires sub-queries, joins, or unions. I have tried all of them but nothing has been satisfactory and I think i'm missing something. The disconnect I keep having is finding the two team ids from each game and then using the tid to grab the team information.

What I would like to do is if given a game id (gid) I can query to find:

home_team_name, home_team_id, away_team_name, away_team_id, team_league(away and home will be the same league), all the information from games table

Table Create Table

 teams  CREATE TABLE `teams` (
 `tid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `name` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
`league` varchar(2) NOT NULL,
`active` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`tid`)

)

CREATE TABLE teams_games (

`tid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
`gid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
`homeoraway` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`tid`,`gid`),
KEY `gid` (`gid`),
CONSTRAINT `teams_games_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`tid`) REFERENCES `teams` (`tid`),
CONSTRAINT `teams_games_ibfk_2` FOREIGN KEY (`gid`) REFERENCES `games` (`gid`)

)

CREATE TABLE games (

`gid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`location` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
`time` datetime NOT NULL,
`description` varchar(400) NOT NULL,
`error` smallint(2) NOT NULL,
`home_score` smallint(2) DEFAULT NULL,
`away_score` smallint(2) DEFAULT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`gid`)

)

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Tried different subqueries and joins. Pieced together code from online and guessed my way through it but without success. My question was already long so I didn't want to fill it up with more stuff. –  ChrisOPeterson Jun 23 '10 at 23:57
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assumed homeoraway = 1 for home and homeoraway = 0 for away.

SELECT g.*, ht.name, ht.tid, at.name, at.tid, ht.league
FROM games g
JOIN team_games htg ON htg.gid = g.gid AND htg.homeoraway = 1
JOIN team ht ON ht.tid = htg.tid
JOIN team_games atg ON atg.gid = g.gid AND atg.homeoraway = 0
JOIN team at ON at.tid = atg.tid

This works by joining games to team_games for the home team, then to teams for the team info, then doing the same thing for the away team.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 what's with the left joins? –  just somebody Jun 23 '10 at 18:07
    
@just, what left joins? –  Marcus Adams Jun 23 '10 at 18:20
    
those from the original revision of your answer. now that you've changed them to inner joins, i've reverted the -1. oh, and regarding your "counter-downvotes": you're my hero. –  just somebody Jun 24 '10 at 1:22
    
This worked great, is very succinct, and understandable. You did leave out the WHERE clause at the end for the g.gid but that was obvious how to do. Thanks. –  ChrisOPeterson Jun 25 '10 at 19:42
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Why not just drop the teams_games table and alter games:

CREATE TABLE games (

 `gid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`location` varchar(60) NOT NULL,
`time` datetime NOT NULL,
`description` varchar(400) NOT NULL,
`error` smallint(2) NOT NULL,
`home_score` smallint(2) DEFAULT NULL,
`away_score` smallint(2) DEFAULT NULL,
`home_tid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
`away_tid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (`gid`)
)

Then you can write a simple join like:

SELECT 
    g.*, 
    h.name as home_team, 
    a.name as away_team, 
    h.league as league 
FROM games AS g 
    INNER JOIN teams AS h ON g.home_tid = h.tid
    INNER JOIN teams as a ON g.away_tid = a.tid
WHERE gid = ?
share|improve this answer
    
The simplest solution, because a game can only ever have, and must have 2 teams involved. This isn't a many-to-many situation, it's a many-to-two situation, so no need for the intermediate joining table at all –  Mark Baker Jun 23 '10 at 18:01
    
+1 either that or the other way around –  just somebody Jun 23 '10 at 18:06
    
The reason I did it this way is because i'm trying to be a good sql citizen and get the hang of the whole many-to-many thing. So yes, I am making it more difficult that it needs to be in this situation and was going to do that initially but decided against it. –  ChrisOPeterson Jun 23 '10 at 23:48
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I assumed that 1 = home, 2 = away. You can change appropriately.

SELECT
    HT.name AS home_team_name,
    HT.tid AS home_team_id,
    AT.name AS away_team_name,
    AT.tid AS away_team_id,
    HT.league AS team_league
FROM
    teams_games HTG
INNER JOIN teams_games ATG ON
    ATG.gid = HTG.gid AND
    ATG.homeoraway = 2
INNER JOIN teams HT ON
    HT.tid = HTG.tid
INNER JOIN teams AT ON
    AT.tid = ATG.tid
WHERE
    HTG.gid = ???
    HTG.homeoraway = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Worked great, thanks tom. I chose Marcus' answer only because it was clearer and more succinct. –  ChrisOPeterson Jun 25 '10 at 19:44
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select 
  th.name as home_team_name,
  th.tid as home_team_id,
  ta.name as away_team_name,
  ta.tid as away_team_id,
  th.league as team_league,
  g.* 
from games g
  inner join teams_games tgh on (g.gid = tgh.gid and tgh.homeoraway = <HOME_VALUE>)
  inner join teams_games tga on (g.gid = tga.gid and tga.homeoraway = <AWAY_VALUE>)
  inner join teams th on (tgh.tid = th.tid)
  inner join teams ta on (tga.tid = ta.tid)
where
  g.gid = <GAME_ID>
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