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To do the equivalent of Python list comprehensions, I'm doing the following:

some_array.select{|x| x % 2 == 0 }.collect{|x| x * 3}

Is there a better way to do this...perhaps with one method call?

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3  
Both yours and glenn mcdonald's answers seem fine to me... I don't see what you'd gain by trying to be more concise than either. –  Pistos Nov 23 '08 at 16:22
1  
this solution transverses the list two times. The inject doesn't. –  Pedro Morte Rolo May 3 '10 at 22:16
2  
Some awesome answers here but it'd be awesome too see ideas for list comprehension across multiple collections. –  bjeanes Apr 22 '12 at 15:01
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13 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

If you really want to, you can create an Array#comprehend method like this:

class Array
  def comprehend(&block)
    return self if block.nil?
    self.collect(&block).compact
  end
end

some_array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
new_array = some_array.comprehend {|x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0}
puts new_array

Prints:

6
12
18

I would probably just do it the way you did though.

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2  
You could use compact! to optimize a bit –  Alexey Nov 16 '11 at 21:44
3  
This isn't actually correct, consider: [nil, nil, nil].comprehend {|x| x } which returns []. –  thirtyseven Jan 2 '13 at 3:05
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How 'bout:

some_array.map {|x| x % 2 == 0 ? x * 3 : nil}.compact

Slightly cleaner, at least to my taste, and according to a quick benchmark test about 15% faster than your version...

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24  
some_array.map {|x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0}.compact works too –  Hafthor Jan 29 '10 at 19:22
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I made a quick benchmark comparing the three alternatives and map-compact really seems to be the best option.

Performance test (Rails)

require 'test_helper'
require 'performance_test_help'

class ListComprehensionTest < ActionController::PerformanceTest

  TEST_ARRAY = (1..100).to_a

  def test_map_compact
    1000.times do
      TEST_ARRAY.map{|x| x % 2 == 0 ? x * 3 : nil}.compact
    end
  end

  def test_select_map
    1000.times do
      TEST_ARRAY.select{|x| x % 2 == 0 }.map{|x| x * 3}
    end
  end

  def test_inject
    1000.times do
      TEST_ARRAY.inject([]) {|all, x| all << x*3 if x % 2 == 0; all }
    end
  end

end

Results

/usr/bin/ruby1.8 -I"lib:test" "/usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.7/lib/rake/rake_test_loader.rb" "test/performance/list_comprehension_test.rb" -- --benchmark
Loaded suite /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/rake-0.8.7/lib/rake/rake_test_loader
Started
ListComprehensionTest#test_inject (1230 ms warmup)
           wall_time: 1221 ms
              memory: 0.00 KB
             objects: 0
             gc_runs: 0
             gc_time: 0 ms
.ListComprehensionTest#test_map_compact (860 ms warmup)
           wall_time: 855 ms
              memory: 0.00 KB
             objects: 0
             gc_runs: 0
             gc_time: 0 ms
.ListComprehensionTest#test_select_map (961 ms warmup)
           wall_time: 955 ms
              memory: 0.00 KB
             objects: 0
             gc_runs: 0
             gc_time: 0 ms
.
Finished in 66.683039 seconds.

15 tests, 0 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
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I discussed this topic with Rein Henrichs, who tells me that the best performing solution is map { ... }.compact. This makes good sense because it avoids building intermediate Arrays (as with the immutable usage of Enumerable#inject), and it avoids growing the Array, which causes allocation. It's as general as any of the others unless your collection can contain nil elements.

I haven't compared this with .select {...}.map{...}. It's possible that Ruby's C implementation of Enumerable#select is very good also.

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alternative solution that will work in every implementation and run in O(n) insted of O(2n) time.

some_array.inject([]){|res,x| x % 2 == 0 ? res << 3*x : res}
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6  
You mean it traverses the list only once. If you go by the formal definition, O(n) equals O(2n). Just nitpicking :) –  Daniel Hepper May 21 '10 at 13:19
    
@Daniel Harper :) Not only you are right, but also for the average case, transversing the list once to discard some entries, and then again to perform an operation can be acctually better in the average cases :) –  Pedro Morte Rolo May 21 '10 at 17:52
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I've just published the comprehend gem to RubyGems, which lets you do this:

require 'comprehend'

some_array.comprehend{ |x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0 }

It's written in C; the array is only traversed once.

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more concise :

[1,2,3,4,5,6].select(&:even?).map{|x| x*3}

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2  
Or, for even more point-free awesomeness [1,2,3,4,5,6].select(&:even?).map(&3.method(:*)) –  Jörg W Mittag Mar 16 '12 at 14:36
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[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6].collect{|x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0}.compact

=> [6, 12, 18]

That works for me. It is also clean. Yes, it's the same as .map, but I think collect makes the code more understandable.

edit: select(&:even?).map() actually looks better, after seeing it below!

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There seems to be some confusion amongst ruby programmers in this thread concerning what list comprehension is. Every single response assumes some preexisting array to transform. But list comprehension's power lies in an array created on the fly with the following syntax:

squares = [x**2 for x in range(10)]

The following would be an analog in ruby (the only adequate answer in this thread, afaic):

a = Array.new(4).map{rand(2**49..2**50)} 

In the above case, I'm creating an array of random integers, but the block could contain anything. But this would be a Ruby list comprehension.

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1  
How would you do what the OP is trying to do? –  Andrew Grimm Mar 27 '12 at 1:09
    
Actually I see now the OP itself had some existing list the author wanted to transform. But the archetypal conception of list comprehension involves creating an array/list where one didn't exist before by referencing some iteration. But actually, some formal definitions say list comprehension can't use map at all, so even my version isn't kosher -but as close as one could get in Ruby I guess. –  Mark Mar 27 '12 at 3:53
1  
I don't get how your Ruby example is supposed to be an analogue of your Python example. The Ruby code should read: squares = (0..9).map { |x| x**2 } –  michau Nov 9 '12 at 15:41
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Enumerable has a grep method whose first argument can be a predicate proc, and whose optional second argument is a mapping function; so the following works:

some_array.grep(proc {|x| x % 2 == 0}) {|x| x*3}

This isn't as readable as a couple of other suggestions (I like anoiaque's simple .select.map or histocrat's comprehend gem), but its strengths are that it's already part of the standard library, and is single-pass (doesn't involve creating temporary intermediate arrays), and doesn't require an out-of-bounds value like nil used in the compact-using suggestions.

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Like Pedro mentioned, you can fuse together the chained calls to Enumerable#select and Enumerable#map, avoiding a traversal over the selected elements. This is true because Enumerable#select is a specialization of fold (or #inject). I posted a hasty introduction to the topic at the Ruby subreddit.

Manually fusing Array transformations can be tedious, so maybe someone could play with Robert Gamble's #comprehend implementation to make this select/map pattern prettier.

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just it:

def lazy(collection, &blk)
   collection.map{|x| blk.call(x)}.compact
end

call:

lazy (1..6){|x| x * 3 if x.even?}

returns:

=> [6, 12, 18]

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I think the most list comprehension-esque would be the following:

some_array.select{ |x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0 }

Since Ruby allows us to place the conditional after the expression, we get syntax similar to the Python version of the list comprehension. Also, since the select method does not include anything that equates to false, all nil values are removed from the resultant list and no call to compact is necessary as would be the case if we had used map or collect instead.

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7  
This doesn't appear to work. At least in Ruby 1.8.6, [1,2,3,4,5,6].select {|x| x * 3 if x % 2 == 0} evaluates to [2, 4, 6] Enumerable#select only cares about whether the block evaluates to true or false, not what value it outputs, AFAIK. –  Greg Campbell Oct 24 '09 at 2:26
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