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What is the most secure implementation of OpenID technology?

Is there someone out there who knows enough about security, cryptography and OpenID specifications? No rumors, just facts.

I would like to know all about insecurities of network communication process between OpenID provider and OpenID-enabled site during:

  • logging in
  • is user logged?
  • user's sensitive information interchange
  • logout

and what should we be aware of.

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6  
I'd get that shift key looked at, clearly it's on the blink. – delete me Jun 23 '10 at 18:23
    
Belongs on Web Apps.com – jjnguy Jun 23 '10 at 18:25
1  
Sorry to ruin your comment MrXexxed - I had to fix the capitalization. Couldn't bear to leave it. – jball Jun 23 '10 at 18:25
1  
@jball hah no worries, I have the edit history to explain. Once I have the mojo necessary I'd edit posts like this and not bitch. – delete me Jun 23 '10 at 18:28

We use SAML.

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@Petr, cool find. – Marcus Adams Jun 24 '10 at 14:16

What is security but an illusion given to the weak by the strong...I trust because I must, I hope because I'm not smart enough to grasp everything, and I ask questions that have no real answer...just momentary agreements between the smart...

I'd say Google probably has the most secure implementation. They have billions of dollars and really smart people.

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Yeah, SAML is good. It has strong encryption between two endpoints. SAML 2.0 has a good binding protocol for messaging through HTTP or SOAP. It also covers identity assertions, so you can better authenticate that the user is who they say they are.

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