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In Javascript, what does it mean when there is a logical operator in a variable declaration?
what’s the javascript “var _gaq = _gaq || []; ” for ?

what does this javascript syntax mean?

var _gaq = _gaq || [];
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marked as duplicate by CMS, sth, Shog9, Matthew Flaschen, gnovice Jun 26 '10 at 15:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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duplicate of: what’s the javascript var _gaq = _gaq || \[\]; for ? and see this similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3088098/… –  CMS Jun 23 '10 at 19:11
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IMO I think it is just bad code, if you declare _gaq with the var statement, it will shadow any other variable named _gaq, higher in the scope chain... –  CMS Jun 23 '10 at 19:18
    
@CMS – Unless you already are in the global scope, which is the case. But even then var isn't necessary. –  Marcel Korpel Jun 23 '10 at 20:32
    
@Marcel, yeah, the only difference in global code between using var or not, is that when you use var the identifier is bound to the Variable Object (which is the global object itself for global code) it is marked as non-deleteable. E.g. var foo = ''; bar = ''; then delete foo == false; and delete bar == true; –  CMS Jun 23 '10 at 20:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

it means assign _gaq the value of _gaq unless it is undefined, in which case _gaq will be an empty list.

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5  
Unless _gaq it's undefined, null, 0, an empty string, NaN or false... –  CMS Jun 23 '10 at 18:59

It's a short way to set _gaq to an empty array if _gaq is undefined. It's probably used to provide a default value for an argument to a function.

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_gaq || []

Is an expression that will return _gaq if it's a non-false value ( I mean is not 0, nor false, nor '') or an empty array in the other case.

var _gaq = _gaq || [];

Always will set [] to _gaq. I tested it in this way from my firebug console:

_gaq = 'crazy value';
(function(){var _gaq = _gaq || []; 
            console.log(_gaq);
 })();

Having in mind that _gaq could be a variable defined in the global namespace. But is not the case.

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I think this is the best answer and deserves it to be marked as such (unless mentioned code is run in global scope, and I think it is). It clearly elaborates CMS' comment on the question. +10 if I could. –  Marcel Korpel Jun 23 '10 at 20:24

I would interpret this as:

If _gaq already stores a value that isn't convertible to false (e.g. a non-empty array), take that value; otherwise, make _gaq refer to an empty array."

Douglas Crockford writes the following about this in his book Javascript - The Good Parts:

The operator || can be used to define default values [...].

Some background info:

  • In JavaScript, there's quite a few values that evaluate to false in a boolean expression; suspects are the number 0, the empty string, NaN, the undefined value (note that undefined is not a keyword!), and false itself.

  • AFAIK, JavaScript's logical OR (||) operator uses short-circuiting, i.e. if the first term in an OR expression is true, the second one won't be evaluated.)

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