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Out of curiousty which of the following code is more efficient (if neither, what would be the best way?)

Backstory - Building a small image carousel and the code in question has to do with the controls (prev, pause/play, next)

<ul class="controls"> 
    <li> <a href="#" class="prev">  Previous Image </a> </li>
    <li> <a href="#" class="pause"> Pause          </a> </li>
    <li> <a href="#" class="next">  Next Image     </a> </li>
</ul>

// inside document.ready()
$(".controls a").click(function() {
    var cur_class = $(this).attr("class");

    if (cur_class == "pause") {
        // do something
    } else if (cur_class == "prev") {
        // do something
    } else if (cur_class == "next") {
        // do something
    }
)};

// OR THIS
$(".controls a.prev").click(function() { /* do something */ });
$(".controls a.pause").click(function() { /* do something */ });
$(".controls a.next").click(function() { /* do something */ });

Thanks M.

share|improve this question
    
Will the class always be the same from load? If not you'll have to think about using the live() handler –  Dave Archer Jun 23 '10 at 19:16
    
not sure if it answers this specific question, but O'reilly's jQuery Cookbook offers some great insight into performance aspects of differing approaches –  STW Jun 23 '10 at 19:21
2  
premature optimization heh –  vittore Jun 23 '10 at 19:31
1  
Efficient how? Execution speed? Initialization speed? Memory overhead? –  user113716 Jun 23 '10 at 19:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Best option is to use .delegate(). Its a new event added to jQuery 1.4.2 and its much better than just using click.

.click() adds a new event for every anchor tag.

.delegate() 'waits' for a click (or any event specified) to be made before adding a new event (for the specific clicked element only).

$(".controls").delegate("a", "click", function() {

    var cur_class = $(this).attr("class");

    if (cur_class == "pause") {
        // do something
    } else if (cur_class == "prev") {
        // do something
    } else if (cur_class == "next") {
        // do something
    }

}

Note: the code is not tested, read the .delegate() info in the jQuery documentation for more info.

Maybe you need to add an id to the <ul>:

(<ul class="controls" id="ul_id">) and then use $("#ul_id").delegate("a", "click", function() { / ... }.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
posting untested code, boo –  Jarrod Roberson Jun 23 '10 at 20:37
1  
It's basic jQuery man... –  Jonathan Jun 23 '10 at 20:56
    
@Matt: I think its time to accept an answer :) –  Jonathan Dec 6 '10 at 10:36

Almost no difference. As your building a carousel the big bottleneck will be the images you load.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that, but was always curious about which technique using jQuery is the more (most?) efficient. I am not having any bottlenecks or load issues or anything like that, just a question of efficiency, especially for future jQuery use. –  Matt Jun 23 '10 at 19:22
1  
when will people learn "most efficient" doesn't mean anything. "most efficient" what, space, time, donuts, monkeys? It is javascript, if you mean "efficient" as in fastest, then do the work, profile if your self and don't rely on people that "think" something is one thing or another, or post untested code. Then you have to test all the javascript interpreters in all the browsers to find out that what you "think" you discovered isn't applicable across environments. –  Jarrod Roberson Jun 23 '10 at 20:40
    
@fuzzy lollipop, chillax bro. Sometimes people consult others, cause you know, other people may have wisdom to impart. Learning from others != laziness. –  Mark Jun 23 '10 at 23:09
    
not putting some timing statements around 2 blocks of code that are already written == lazy. And this is premature micro optimization at its worst! –  Jarrod Roberson Jun 24 '10 at 2:30

I think the following is the fastest way. It only fetches a DOM nodelist once and filters it instead of fetching it three times

$('.controls a')
.filter('.prev')
.click(function(){/*...*/})
.end()
.filter('.pause')
.click(function(){/*...*/})
.end()
.filter('.next')
.click(function(){/*...*/});
share|improve this answer
    
Is that actually faster than just doing $(".controls a.prev") ? –  Matt Jun 23 '10 at 19:20
1  
I think it is. It only fetches a DOM nodelist once and filters it instead of fetching it three times. –  Jacob Relkin Jun 23 '10 at 19:26
    
I think .delegate() was made for this specific problem so it's probably more efficient than .filter() –  Jonathan Jun 23 '10 at 20:31

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