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Does Lua make use of 64-bit integers? How do I use it?

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Compile it yourself. Lua uses double-precision floating point numbers by default. However, this can be changed in the source (luaconf.h, look for LUA_NUMBER).

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To clarify, Lua has a single numerical data type. By default this is a double, but can be changed in the header files to another type, such as int64_t. –  Yann Ramin Jun 23 '10 at 19:18
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If you change the number type in luaconf.h, don't forget to change the related macros accordingly. –  lhf Jun 23 '10 at 21:44
    
@lhf: It's documented right above the macro, though, so I thought it'd be pretty discoverable. –  Јοеу Jun 23 '10 at 22:17
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Note that this will have some sweeping side effects, since this is the only type numbers will have. For example, math.sin is not necessarily sensible with an integral type for LUA_NUMBER. There is a patch to the Lua sources, known as the LNUM patch, which can mitigate this by supporting an integral type alongside a floating point type. See stackoverflow.com/questions/945731/… –  RBerteig Jun 24 '10 at 0:15
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@Aaron: There is only a single numerical type and even with the LNUM patch RBerteig mentioned that doesn't change from the programmer's point of view – you just suddenly have 64-bit integers alongside with doubles and as far as I understood it choosing the correct type will be done automatically. You don't declare types in Lua as you do in VB or C# – those languages use a completely different typing discipline. –  Јοеу Jun 24 '10 at 7:23
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require "bit"

-- Lua unsigned 64bit emulated bitwises
-- Slow. But it works.

function i64(v)
 local o = {}; o.l = v; o.h = 0; return o;
end -- constructor +assign 32-bit value

function i64_ax(h,l)
 local o = {}; o.l = l; o.h = h; return o;
end -- +assign 64-bit v.as 2 regs

function i64u(x)
 return ( ( (bit.rshift(x,1) * 2) + bit.band(x,1) ) % (0xFFFFFFFF+1));
end -- keeps [1+0..0xFFFFFFFFF]

function i64_clone(x)
 local o = {}; o.l = x.l; o.h = x.h; return o;
end -- +assign regs

-- Type conversions

function i64_toInt(a)
  return (a.l + (a.h * (0xFFFFFFFF+1)));
end -- value=2^53 or even less, so better use a.l value

function i64_toString(a)
  local s1=string.format("%x",a.l);
  local s2=string.format("%x",a.h);
  local s3="0000000000000000";
  s3=string.sub(s3,1,16-string.len(s1))..s1;
  s3=string.sub(s3,1,8-string.len(s2))..s2..string.sub(s3,9);
  return "0x"..string.upper(s3);
end

-- Bitwise operators (the main functionality)

function i64_and(a,b)
 local o = {}; o.l = i64u( bit.band(a.l, b.l) ); o.h = i64u( bit.band(a.h, b.h) ); return o;
end

function i64_or(a,b)
 local o = {}; o.l = i64u( bit.bor(a.l, b.l) ); o.h = i64u( bit.bor(a.h, b.h) ); return o;
end

function i64_xor(a,b)
 local o = {}; o.l = i64u( bit.bxor(a.l, b.l) ); o.h = i64u( bit.bxor(a.h, b.h) ); return o;
end

function i64_not(a)
 local o = {}; o.l = i64u( bit.bnot(a.l) ); o.h = i64u( bit.bnot(a.h) ); return o;
end

function i64_neg(a)
 return i64_add( i64_not(a), i64(1) );
end  -- negative is inverted and incremented by +1

-- Simple Math-functions

-- just to add, not rounded for overflows
function i64_add(a,b)
 local o = {};
 o.l = a.l + b.l;
 local r = o.l - 0xFFFFFFFF;
 o.h = a.h + b.h;
 if( r>0 ) then
   o.h = o.h + 1;
   o.l = r-1;
 end
 return o;
end

-- verify a>=b before usage
function i64_sub(a,b)
  local o = {}
  o.l = a.l - b.l;
  o.h = a.h - b.h;
  if( o.l<0 ) then
    o.h = o.h - 1;
    o.l = o.l + 0xFFFFFFFF+1;
  end
  return o;
end

-- x n-times
function i64_by(a,n)
 local o = {};
 o.l = a.l;
 o.h = a.h;
 for i=2, n, 1 do
   o = i64_add(o,a);
 end
 return o;
end
-- no divisions   

-- Bit-shifting

function i64_lshift(a,n)
 local o = {};
 if(n==0) then
   o.l=a.l; o.h=a.h;
 else
   if(n<32) then
     o.l= i64u( bit.lshift( a.l, n) ); o.h=i64u( bit.lshift( a.h, n) )+ bit.rshift(a.l, (32-n));
   else
     o.l=0; o.h=i64u( bit.lshift( a.l, (n-32)));
   end
  end
  return o;
end

function i64_rshift(a,n)
 local o = {};
 if(n==0) then
   o.l=a.l; o.h=a.h;
 else
   if(n<32) then
     o.l= bit.rshift(a.l, n)+i64u( bit.lshift(a.h, (32-n))); o.h=bit.rshift(a.h, n);
   else
     o.l=bit.rshift(a.h, (n-32)); o.h=0;
   end
  end
  return o;
end

-- Comparisons

function i64_eq(a,b)
 return ((a.h == b.h) and (a.l == b.l));
end

function i64_ne(a,b)
 return ((a.h ~= b.h) or (a.l ~= b.l));
end

function i64_gt(a,b)
 return ((a.h > b.h) or ((a.h == b.h) and (a.l >  b.l)));
end

function i64_ge(a,b)
 return ((a.h > b.h) or ((a.h == b.h) and (a.l >= b.l)));
end

function i64_lt(a,b)
 return ((a.h < b.h) or ((a.h == b.h) and (a.l <  b.l)));
end

function i64_le(a,b)
 return ((a.h < b.h) or ((a.h == b.h) and (a.l <= b.l)));
end


-- samples
a = i64(1);               -- 1
b = i64_ax(0x1,0);        -- 4294967296 = 2^32
a = i64_lshift(a,32);     -- now i64_eq(a,b)==true
print( i64_toInt(b)+1 );  -- 4294967297

X = i64_ax(0x00FFF0FF, 0xFFF0FFFF);
Y = i64_ax(0x00000FF0, 0xFF0000FF);

-- swap algorithm
X = i64_xor(X,Y);
Y = i64_xor(X,Y);
X = i64_xor(X,Y);

print( "X="..i64_toString(X) ); -- 0x00000FF0FF0000FF
print( "Y="..i64_toString(Y) ); -- 0x00FFF0FFFFF0FFFF
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