Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Visual Studio 2008. I have this class:

template <bool T1>
class Foo {
public:
    void doSomething() {}

    Foo<T1>& operator=(int a) {
        doSomething();
        return *this;
    }
};

But I want that the method operator= be hidden (by simply doing: return *this) if the template parameter T1 is false.

I need that for instances of Foo, the lines:

Foo<false> foo;
foo = 20; //this should give a compilation error

So I tried specializing the class definition:

template<>
class Foo<false> {
private:
    Foo<false>& operator=(int a) {
        return *this;
    }
};

However, by doing this I lose the method doSomething() on instances that are Foo<false>, which is not what I need.

I've tried removing the operator= with boost::enable_if, like this:

typename boost::enable_if<
    boost::mpl::bool_<T1>
    , Foo<T1>
>::type&
operator=(int a) {
    callProxy();
    return *this;
}

But that makes me unable to have a class like the following:

class Bar {
public:
   Foo<true> assignable;
   Foo<false> unassignable;
};

I've also tried putting both methods in Foo and removing them with boost::enable_if and boost::disable_if, like this:

 template <bool T1>
 class Foo {
 public:
    void doSomething() {}

    typename boost::enable_if<
        boost::mpl::bool_<T1>
        , Foo<T1>
    >::type&
    operator=(int a) {
        doSomething();
        return *this;
    }

 private:
    typename boost::disable_if<
        boost::mpl::bool_<T1>
        , Foo<T1>
    >::type&
    operator=(int a) {
        return *this;
    }
 };

Which didn't work too (I expected that, but it was worth trying).

So, is it possible to get the behaviour I need, and if it is, how could I do it?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm confused why you need such behavior. :) –  GManNickG Jun 23 '10 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can statically assert the condition:

Foo<T1>& operator=(int a) {
    BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT(T1);
    doSomething();
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked as a charm. Thank you very much. –  Edison Gustavo Muenz Jun 23 '10 at 20:11

why not just use a regular if()?

if(T1) doSomething();

share|improve this answer
    
That would work, but I need that for instances of Foo<false> calls for operator= give me a compilation error. –  Edison Gustavo Muenz Jun 23 '10 at 19:57
1  
@Edison: So...then your code class Bar { public: Foo<true> assignable; Foo<false> unassignable; }; shouldn't work. –  GManNickG Jun 23 '10 at 19:58
2  
Ok, then just add static int dummy[T1]; in the body of the operator= When T1 is false, the array size will be zero, which is not allowed. Or you could use BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT. –  zvrba Jun 23 '10 at 19:59
    
Why not? I can provide a no-op operator=, like i did when specializing Foo with: template <> class Foo<false> { private: Foo<false>& operator=(int a) { return *this; } }; –  Edison Gustavo Muenz Jun 23 '10 at 20:05
    
@Edison: So, do you want a compile-error or a no-op operator? You must make up your mind. –  GManNickG Jun 23 '10 at 21:05

Instead of special-casing the false case, you could special-case the true case, and only include the operator= in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
If I do that, the following code won't compile: class Bar { public: Foo<true> assignable; Foo<false> unassignable; }; –  Edison Gustavo Muenz Jun 23 '10 at 20:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.