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What is meaning of using the second parameter with a comma in the below code?

int *num = new int[25,2];
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5  
Does that even compile? –  Janick Bernet Jun 24 '10 at 6:36
3  
Yes, it's perfectly legal code (unfortunately) –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Jun 24 '10 at 6:44
    
But notice that new (int[25, 2]) is not legal code. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 24 '10 at 9:57
    
@Johannes: Did you mean new int(25, 2)? Oh, wait, is new (int [25]) and new int (25) equivalent? –  Lazer Jun 24 '10 at 14:13
    
@Lazer no i meant what i wrote.The expression inside the brackets is required to be a constant expression then, but 25, 2 does not syntactically match it and neither semantically. So even if you write it as new (int[(25, 2)]) it is illegal code. Doesn't need a comma operator to explain it - even int n = 1; new (int[n]); is illegal - n isn't a constant expression. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 24 '10 at 16:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

That's the comma operator in action: it evaluates it's operand and returns the last one, in your case 2. So that is equivalent with:

int *num = new int[2];

It's probably safe to say that the 25,2 part was not what was intended, unless it's a trick question.

Edit: thank you Didier Trosset.

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Does the comma operator return the first operand or the last one? –  AraK Jun 24 '10 at 6:42
4  
It returns the last one. –  Didier Trosset Jun 24 '10 at 6:42
1  
This looks alot like Didiers answer.. Did you use the same source, or do programmers just think alike :) –  Default Jun 24 '10 at 6:49
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@Peter Alexander: Might want to check the 'answered x mins ago' part ;) I've thanked Didier for pointing that it returns the last not the first like I initially said. –  Eugen Constantin Dinca Jun 24 '10 at 6:55
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@Lonli: It is not; at least one operand has to be a user defined type. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 24 '10 at 7:11

That's the comma operator in action: it evaluates it's operand and returns the last one, in your case 2. So that is equivalent with:

int *num = new int[2];
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2  
Please note that the text of the posts on SO is published with a license that requires attribution. You may copy-paste, but you should cite the sources. –  avakar Jun 24 '10 at 7:14
    
Eugen Dinca posted the exact same answer 2 minutes before you. I'm not sure re-posting his answer just to correct one word is more efficient (and more elegant) than just pointing out the error so he can fix his answer. –  ereOn Jun 24 '10 at 7:32
    
I didn't thought I could edit others' answers. I actually first pointed the error in a comment, you can see it, and a couple of minutes after copied-pasted his answer to correct it. With my apologies for the non correct behavior. –  Didier Trosset Jun 24 '10 at 8:02

You are using the comma operator, which is making the code do something that you might not expect at a first glance.

The comma operator evaluates the LHS operand then evaluates and returns the RHS operand. So in the case of 25, 2 it will evaluate 25 (doing nothing) then evaluate and return 2, so that line of code is equivalent to:

int *num = new int[2];
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// Declare a single-dimensional array
int[] array1 = new int[5];

    // Declare and set array element values 
    int[] array2 = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 };

    // Alternative syntax 
    int[] array3 = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };

    // Declare a two dimensional array 
    int[,] multiDimensionalArray1 = new int[2, 3];

    // Declare and set array element values 
    int[,] multiDimensionalArray2 = { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 } };

    // Declare a  array 
    int[][] Array = new int[6][];

    // Set the values of the first array in the  array structure
    Array[0] = new int[4] { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
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