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I am trying to create a .dbf table using visual c# because i need it to import data to another application. For that purpose I need the column order to be exactly right otherwise that application won't accept the table. It's been working fine so far, but recently I had to make some changes to the structure of the table, and I have added the columns in the exact position in the CREATE Statement. The problem that I am getting is that when I open the table after creation with Visual Fox Pro the new columns are at the end of the table, not where i put them.

My code is as follows:

region create dbf file

        //create the file again
        string strCreate = "CREATE TABLE " + strExportPath + "\\"+fisier+" " + 
            "(TIPD Numeric(1), "+
            " LN Numeric(2), " +
            " AN Numeric(4), "+
            " DEN_ANG Char(50), " +
            " CUI Char(13), " +
            " NR_CRT Numeric(6), "+
            " TIP_RECTIF Char(1), " +
            " NUME_ASIG Char(50), " +
            " CNP Char(13), "+
            " CNP_COPIL Char(13), "+
            " CAS_ASIG Char(2), "+
            " ZI_LUCRAT Numeric(2), "+
            " TOT_ZI_LUC Numeric(2), "+
            " SERIE_CCM Char(5), "+
            " NUMAR_CCM Char(10), "+
            " SERIE_CCM_ Char(5), "+
            " NUMAR_CCM_ Char(10), "+
            " DATA_ACORD DATE, " +
            " COD_INDEMN Char(2), " +
            " ZI_PRE_ANG Numeric(1), "+
            " ZI_FN Numeric(2), " +
            " ZI_PRE Numeric(2), "+
            " LOC_PRES Numeric(2), "+
            " SUM_ANG Numeric(18), "+
            " FN Numeric(18), " +
            " DATA_INC DATE, "+
            " DATA_SF DATE, "+
            " COD_URG Char(3), " +
            " COD_CONTAG Char(2), "+
            " BAZA_CALC Numeric(6), "+
            " ZI_BZ_CALC Numeric(3), "+
            " MZBCI Numeric(8,4), "+
            " ME_NR CHAR(10))";



        OleDbConnection con = new OleDbConnection(strConn);
        try 
        {
            con.Open();
        }
        catch //(Exception ex)
        {
            NMsgBox("Err", "", "Renunta");
            return;
        }

        OleDbCommand createCmd = new OleDbCommand(strCreate, con);
        try
        {
            createCmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
        catch //(Exception ex)
        {
            NMsgBox("Err "+fisier, "", Renunta");
            return;
        }
        con.Close();

Columns like CNP_COPIL, DATA_ACORD and LOC_PRES are some of the new column, and are always put last, even if I execute the CREATE COMMAND in Visual Fox Pro

I can also mention that I CREATE an empty table everytime and fill it with data, I don't do alter table, because i don't need to. Every month there's a new table.

And I don't seem to get why it would put "new columns" last, even IF the table is a new one and i have deleted every previous one from that location

share|improve this question
    
First thing to ask is if you get the same effect if you create the table in a new, clean, never used before and otherwise thoroughly empty, database? –  Murph Jun 24 '10 at 8:37
    
same thing happens. when i open the database and see the column order it is correct but when i browse the table the columns are at the end. and on the long run i can't use databases because the end-user does not have visual fox pro, and thus cannot acces the table and import it –  schumitza Jun 24 '10 at 8:57
    
do you wanna hear the funny part? on my boss's computer where in run the Create sequence exclusively in Visual Fox Pro 9.0 it works like it should. This is so strange, could it be a case of restoring some old info on my computer? –  schumitza Jun 24 '10 at 11:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It of course makes zero sense that the columns would be re-ordered when the table is brand new. And that the order looks correct when you look at the table structure.

There's only one good explanation: whatever program you are using to look at the table has memorized the column order from a previous run. And puts the new columns at the end. This would be a very common and desirable feature, allowing the user to get back the view of the table just like it was the last time she looked at it. The layout data has to be stored in private data of the program, the .dbf file format cannot store it.

This is just a display artifact, it cannot affect proper operation in any way.

share|improve this answer
    
The thing is (and btw I am using Visual FOx Pro 9.0) that, putting viewing issues aside, the third party application that I am importing .dbf files to gives the error "data structure not correct" and I tend to agree with them when I see my structure is not. I can't fix it in C#...and of course I have tommorow as deadline... –  schumitza Jun 24 '10 at 11:41
    
yep, found the problem, it's what Hans Passant said, it's not a bug, it's a feature, it shows the columns added last. anyway, thank's for the help but my problem is not entirely resolved –  schumitza Jun 24 '10 at 11:47
    
I can't guess what other problem you might have. Please add details to your question or close the thread by marking it answered. –  Hans Passant Jun 24 '10 at 11:59

You can change the column order of a Foxpro Table within the Foxpro IDE.

USE table EXCLUSIVE
MODIFY STRUCTURE

Click on the button on left of the field and drag it up or down to where you need it.

EDIT: After reading the comment about it working on your boss's computer it sounds like the problem is that the foxuser.dbf is remembering the column order you browsed with last - since the columns weren't there the last time it just shows them at the end though they are really in the middle.

What exact command are you using to look at the table on your computer?

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