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What's the difference?

var A = function () {
    this.x = function () {
        //do something
    };
};

or

var A = function () { };
A.prototype.x = function () {
    //do something
};
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8 Answers 8

The examples have very different outcomes.

Before looking at the differences, the following should be noted:

  • A constructor's prototype provides a way to share methods and values among instances via the instance's private [[Prototype]] property.
  • A function's this is set by how the function is called or by the use of bind (not discussed here). Where a function is called on an object (e.g. myObj.method()) then this within the method references the object. Where this is not set by the call or by the use of bind, it defaults to the global object (window in a browser) or in strict mode, remains undefined.
  • JavaScript is a object oriented language, i.e. everything is an Object, including functions.

So here are the snippets in question:

var A = function () {
    this.x = function () {
        //do something
    };
};

In this case, variable A is assigned a value that is a reference to a function. When that function is called using A(), the function's this isn't set by the call so it defaults to the global object and the expression this.x is effectively window.x. The result is that a reference to the function expression on the right hand side is assigned to window.x.

In the case of:

var A = function () { };
A.prototype.x = function () {
    //do something
};

something very different occurs. In the first line, variable A is assigned a reference to a function. In JavaScript, all functions objects have a prototype property by default so there is no separate code to create an A.prototype object.

In the second line, A.prototype.x is assigned a reference to a function. This will create an x property if it doesn't exist, or assign a new value if it does. So the difference with the first example is which object's x property is involved in the expression.

Another example is below. It's similar to the first one (and may be what you meant to ask about):

var A = new function () {
    this.x = function () {
        //do something
    };
};

In this example, the new operator has been added before the function expression so that the function is called as a constructor. When called with new, the function's this is set to reference a new Object whose private [[Prototype]] property is set to reference the constructor's public prototype. So in the assignment statement, the x property will be created on this new object. When called as a constructor, a function returns its this object by default, so there is no need for a separate return this; statement.

To check that A has an x property:

console.log(A.x) // function () {
                 //   //do something
                 // };

This is an uncommon use of new, since the only way to reference the constructor is via A.constructor. It would be much more common to do:

var A = function () {
    this.x = function () {
        //do something
    };

var a = new A();

Another way of achieving a similar result is to use an immediately invoked function expression:

var A = (function () {
    this.x = function () {
        //do something
    };
}());

In this case, A assigned the return value of calling the function on the right hand side. Here again, since this is not set in the call, it will reference the global object and this.x is effectively window.x. Since the function doesn't return anything, A will have a value of undefined.

Related questions:

Sidenote: There may not be any significant memory savings between the two approaches, however using the prototype to share methods and properties will likely use less memory than each instance having its own copy.

JavaScript isn't a low-level language. It may not be very valuable to think of prototyping or other inheritance patterns as a way to explicitly change the way memory is allocated.

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3  
Isn't it actually that every function has a prototype (not every object)? For instance, the following returns undefined: ({}).prototype. –  Lachlan Cotter Sep 30 '11 at 15:16
20  
@keparo: You are wrong. Every object has a [internal] prototype object (which can be null), but this is very different from the prototype property - which is on functions and to which the prototype of all the instances is set when they are constructed with new. Can't believe this really got 87 upvotes :-( –  Bergi Sep 18 '12 at 18:56
5  
"The language is functional" are you sure that this is what functional means? –  phant0m Sep 26 '12 at 10:10
9  
I second what @Bergi said about prototypes. Functions have a prototype property. All objects, including functions, have another internal property which can be accessed with Object.getPrototypeOf(myObject) or with myObject.__proto__ in some browsers. The proto property indicates the object's parent in the prototype chain (or the object from which this object inherits). The prototype property (which is only on functions) indicated the object that will become the parent of any objects that utilize the function to create new objects using the new keyword. –  Jim Cooper Mar 13 '13 at 14:41
4  
This article is quite misguided and confuses how this is set. Working on a re–write. –  RobG Feb 5 at 1:00
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As others have said the first version, using "this" results in every instance of the class A having its own independent copy of function method "x". Whereas using "prototype" will mean that each instance of class A will use the same copy of method "x".

Here is some code to show this subtle difference:

// x is a method assigned to the object using "this"
var A = function () {
    this.x = function () {
        alert('A');
    };
};
A.prototype.updateX = function(value) {
    this.x = function() {
        alert(value);
    }
};

var a1 = new A();
var a2 = new A();
a1.x();  // Displays 'A'
a2.x();  // Also displays 'A'
a1.updateX('Z');
a1.x();  // Displays 'Z'
a2.x();  // Still displays 'A'

// Here x is a method assigned to the object using "prototype"
var B = function () { };
B.prototype.x = function () {
    alert('B');
};
B.prototype.updateX = function(value) {
    B.prototype.x = function() {
        alert(value);
    }
}

var b1 = new B();
var b2 = new B();
b1.x();  // Displays 'B'
b2.x();  // Also displays 'B'
b1.updateX('Y');
b1.x();  // Displays 'Y'
b2.x();  // Also displays 'Y' because by using prototype we
         // have changed it for all instances

As others have mentioned, there are various reasons to choose one method or the other. My sample is just meant to clearly demonstrate the difference.

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2  
This is what I would expect to happen, but when I instantiated a new object after changing A.x like above, still I display 'A' unless I use A like a singleton. jsbin.com/omida4/2/edit –  jellyfishtree Oct 19 '10 at 21:08
9  
That's because my example was wrong. It's only been wrong for two years. Sigh. But the point is still valid. I updated the example with one that actually works. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Benry Oct 23 '10 at 8:04
    
It's a static method! :D –  Editor May 4 at 19:51
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In most cases they are essentially the same, but the second version saves memory because there is only one instance of the function instead of a separate function for each object.

A reason to use the first form is to access "private members". For example:

var A = function () {
    var private_var = ...;

    this.x = function () {
        return private_var;
    };

    this.setX = function (new_x) {
        private_var = new_x;
    };
};

Because of javascript's scoping rules, private_var is available to the function assigned to this.x, but not outside the object.

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See this post: stackoverflow.com/a/1441692/654708 for an example on how to access private members via prototypes. –  GFoley83 Mar 12 at 0:28
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The ultimate problem with using this instead of prototype is that when overriding a method, the constructor of the base class will still refer to the overridden method. Consider this:

BaseClass = function() {
    var text = null;

    this.setText = function(value) {
        text = value + " BaseClass!";
    };

    this.getText = function() {
        return text;
    };

    this.setText("Hello"); // This always calls BaseClass.setText()
};

SubClass = function() {
    // setText is not overridden yet,
    // so the constructor calls the superclass' method
    BaseClass.call(this);

    // Keeping a reference to the superclass' method
    var super_setText = this.setText;
    // Overriding
    this.setText = function(value) {
        super_setText.call(this, "SubClass says: " + value);
    };
};
SubClass.prototype = new BaseClass();

var subClass = new SubClass();
console.log(subClass.getText()); // Hello BaseClass!

subClass.setText("Hello"); // setText is already overridden
console.log(subClass.getText()); // SubClass says: Hello BaseClass!

versus:

BaseClass = function() {
    this.setText("Hello"); // This calls the overridden method
};

BaseClass.prototype.setText = function(value) {
    this.text = value + " BaseClass!";
};

BaseClass.prototype.getText = function() {
    return this.text;
};

SubClass = function() {
    // setText is already overridden, so this works as expected
    BaseClass.call(this);
};
SubClass.prototype = new BaseClass();

SubClass.prototype.setText = function(value) {
    BaseClass.prototype.setText.call(this, "SubClass says: " + value);
};

var subClass = new SubClass();
console.log(subClass.getText()); // SubClass says: Hello BaseClass!

If you think this is not a problem, then it depends on whether you can live without private variables, and whether you are experienced enough to know a leak when you see one. Also, having to put the constructor logic after the method definitions is inconvenient.

var A = function (param1) {
    var privateVar = null; // Private variable

    // Calling this.setPrivateVar(param1) here would be an error

    this.setPrivateVar = function (value) {
        privateVar = value;
        console.log("setPrivateVar value set to: " + value);

        // param1 is still here, possible memory leak
        console.log("setPrivateVar has param1: " + param1);
    };

    // The constructor logic starts here possibly after
    // many lines of code that define methods

    this.setPrivateVar(param1); // This is valid
};

var a = new A(0);
// setPrivateVar value set to: 0
// setPrivateVar has param1: 0

a.setPrivateVar(1);
//setPrivateVar value set to: 1
//setPrivateVar has param1: 0

versus:

var A = function (param1) {
    this.setPublicVar(param1); // This is valid
};
A.prototype.setPublicVar = function (value) {
    this.publicVar = value; // No private variable
};

var a = new A(0);
a.setPublicVar(1);
console.log(a.publicVar); // 1
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The first example changes the interface for that object only. The second example changes the interface for all object of that class.

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Prototype is the template of the class; which applies to all future instances of it. Whereas this is the particular instance of the object.

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I believe that @Matthew Crumley is right. They are functionally, if not structurally, equivalent. If you use Firebug to look at the objects that are created using new, you can see that they are the same. However, my preference would be the following. I'm guessing that it just seems more like what I'm used to in C#/Java. That is, define the class, define the fields, constructor, and methods.

var A = function() {};
A.prototype = {
    _instance_var: 0,

    initialize: function(v) { this._instance_var = v; },

    x: function() {  alert(this._instance_var); }
};

EDIT Didn't mean to imply that the scope of the variable was private, I was just trying to illustrate how I define my classes in javascript. Variable name has been changed to reflect this.

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_instance_var as in the initialize and x methods do not refer to the _instance_var` property on an A instance, but to a global one. Use this._instance_var if you meant to use the _instance_var property of an A instance. –  Lekensteyn Apr 8 '11 at 16:40
    
@Lek -- oops. fixed. –  tvanfosson Apr 8 '11 at 17:46
1  
The funny thing is, Benry made such an error as well, which has been uncovered after two years as well :p –  Lekensteyn Apr 8 '11 at 19:04
    
@Lek - no unit tests on SO. :-( –  tvanfosson Apr 8 '11 at 20:12
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What's the difference? => A lot.

I think, the 'this' version is used to enable encapsulation, i.e. data hiding. It helps to manipulate private variables.

Let us look at the following example:

  var AdultPerson = function() {

  var age;

  this.setAge = function(val) {
    // some housekeeping
    age = val >= 18 && val;
  };

  this.getAge = function() {
    return age;
  };

  this.isValid = function() {
    return !!age;
  };
};

Now, the 'prototype' structure can be applied as following:

Different adults have different ages, but all of the adults get the same rights.
So, we add it using prototype, rather than this.

AdultPerson.prototype.getRights = function() {
  // Should be valid
  return this.isValid() && ['Booze', 'Drive'];
};

Let look at the implementation now.

var p1 = new AdultPerson;
p1.setAge(12); // ( age = false )
console.log(p1.getRights()); // false ( Kid alert! )
p1.setAge(19); // ( age = 19 )
console.log(p1.getRights()); // ['Booze', 'Drive'] ( Welcome AdultPerson )

var p2 = new AdultPerson;
p2.setAge(45);
// The same getRights() method, *** not a new copy of it ***
console.log(p2.getRights());

Hope this helps!

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