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I have a very basic random number function which generates a random number from a range;

ie:

// The random is seeded earlier on in the applicationDidFinishLaunching() function
-(NSUInteger)makeRandomNumber:(NSUInteger)minNumber to:(NSUInteger)maxNumber
{
 //NSUInteger i = (NSUInteger)( (random() / (double)RAND_MAX) * y);

 NSUInteger i = (arc4random() % (maxNumber - minNumber)) + minNumber; 
 return i;
}

I want to add an optional modulus operation to this function, so that you only return numbers that are modulus of something.

I'm wanting to do this to generate Wages for random people, I find that wages that round with a 5 or 0 much more readable.

I'm not sure how to make an optional parameter or force the randomisation to continue looping until it has found the optional modulus value.

Another issue is that sometimes the loop can continue forever if there is no modulus to find.

ie;

Randomise between 0 and 100 and return a value that is modulus of 5.

EDIT: This should work with any range, regardless of what min or max are. The above numbers are just examples.

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Computing random numbers with modulus operator is usually bad. You can't guarantee that low order bits of your random number generator are that much random. –  Alexandre C. Jun 24 '10 at 13:36
    
Is the commented out randomiser a better way to do the randomisation? –  zardon Jun 25 '10 at 10:44
    
I've found via some tests that the range will not return the maxNumber in your range. [code] NSUInteger i = (arc4random() % (maxNumber - minNumber)) + minNumber; [/code] For example, if I do a rand on a range between 1 and 10, I will not get 10, nor will I get 1. If you want a range that includes 1 and 10 (min and max) the algorithm needs adjusting. –  zardon Jun 25 '10 at 11:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

ITYM multiple of 5. For your example you would just generate a random value between 0 and 20 then multiply this by 5.

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2  
Agreed. You're 43 secs faster than me. –  adib Jun 24 '10 at 12:13
    
-1. This doesn't give equal probability to all possible outputs either. you'll have a 0.5% chance of generating a 0, 1% chance of generating numbers 1-19, and a 0.5% chance of generating a 20. Unless you provide some code to modify the OP's random number generator. –  Stephen Furlani Jun 24 '10 at 13:56
    
@Stephen Furlani: I didn't say that the OP should use his existing RNG - I just said "generate a random value between 0 and 20 then multiply this by 5". –  Paul R Jun 24 '10 at 14:14
    
I was using 5 as an example, it could be 25, 50, 10, I guess the multiplication could be used just as well. –  zardon Jun 25 '10 at 10:28
    
Further, how do you make an optional parameter? –  zardon Jun 25 '10 at 10:30

I think a loop will work well enough:

 NSUInteger i = 0;
 do {
   NSUInteger i = (arc4random() % (maxNumber - minNumber)) + minNumber; 
 } while(i % 5 != 0);
share|improve this answer
    
This is rather inefficient and unnecessarily complicated. Also I think your terminating condition needs to be while ((i % 5) != 0) ? –  Paul R Jun 24 '10 at 12:13
    
yeah, sure, it is my fault. It is 20% chance and if you don't call that really often, efficiency will not be big problem –  vodkhang Jun 24 '10 at 12:16
    
This loop works great, but I notice Paul R says it is inefficient. I'm quite happy to use a more efficient resolution. Thanks. –  zardon Jun 25 '10 at 11:02
    
yeah, sure, you should go for Paul R answer. It is a better one –  vodkhang Jun 25 '10 at 15:01

Integer division will make sure your number is a multiple of roundNumber only as it truncates the decimal in the divide, and then restores the original rounded number in the multiply.

// The random is seeded earlier on in the applicationDidFinishLaunching() function
-(NSUInteger)makeRandomNumber:(NSUInteger)minNumber to:(NSUInteger)maxNumber round:(NSUInteger) roundNumber
{   
 NSUInteger i = (arc4random() % (maxNumber - minNumber)) + minNumber; 
 return (i / roundNumber) * roundNumber;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't give equal probability to all possible outputs - e.g. for the above example (0..100), 100 will occur less frequently than the other possible values. –  Paul R Jun 24 '10 at 13:44
    
@Paul, well, yes. Since you're rounding/truncating the values they can't have even distribution. For example, even if you followed a decent rounding rule (.5) 0 would only be called if the value was 0-> .499 whereas 1 would be called if the value was 0.5->1.4999. I'll point out that your answer doesn't address this issue of equal probability either. equal probability was also not a requirement by the OP. Readability , and an optional rounding parameter, was. –  Stephen Furlani Jun 24 '10 at 13:49

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