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I want to display numbers as follows

  • 1 as 1st,
  • 2 as 2nd,
  • ...,
  • 150 as 150th.

How should I find the correct ordinal suffix (st, nd, rd or th) for each number in my code?

share|improve this question
2  
See my answer here. stackoverflow.com/questions/69262/… That question was for .NET, but I answered with a PHP solution, so it should help you out. – nickf Jun 24 '10 at 12:51
    
The only way I can think of doing this is have a if statement going up for every number you could possible have, IE, if(1) then "st" elseif (2) then "nd" etc etc if (23000) then "nd". It's a problem if you have big numbers but you could write a program to write the code for you, it could loop all the numbers printing the ifs for you to copy + paste into your code. – Tom Gullen Jun 24 '10 at 12:52
2  
@Tom, a lookup table might be better, just initialize it with the 23000 values and get the value at index n, where n is the number you want the ordinal. – John Boker Jun 24 '10 at 12:55
2  
Col. Shrapnel. you may brilliant but not all. any way thanks for showing interest on my question – ArK Jun 24 '10 at 12:56
    
@John, very very clever idea, it would be very quick to access as well as each index represents the number you are looking up. – Tom Gullen Jun 24 '10 at 12:56

14 Answers 14

up vote 164 down vote accepted

from wikipedia:

$ends = array('th','st','nd','rd','th','th','th','th','th','th');
if (($number %100) >= 11 && ($number%100) <= 13)
   $abbreviation = $number. 'th';
else
   $abbreviation = $number. $ends[$number % 10];

Where $number is the number you want to write. Works with any natural number.

As a function:

function ordinal($number) {
    $ends = array('th','st','nd','rd','th','th','th','th','th','th');
    if ((($number % 100) >= 11) && (($number%100) <= 13))
        return $number. 'th';
    else
        return $number. $ends[$number % 10];
}
//Example Usage
echo ordinal(100);
share|improve this answer
1  
Lovely solution – Tom Gullen Jun 24 '10 at 12:50
34  
+1 for using the array, the duct tape of the universe :) – Lukman Jun 24 '10 at 13:02
1  
Terrific solution, works great. – Nicholas Kreidberg Dec 7 '10 at 0:33
2  
I like your solution. Additionally if you prefer not to generate 0th modify the last line to be $abbreviation = ($number)? $number. $ends[$number % 10] : $number; – Gavin Jackson Feb 26 '14 at 10:02
1  
plus 1 to wikipedia – Elvis Ciotti Dec 10 '14 at 12:39

PHP has built-in functionality for this. It even handles internationalization!

$locale = 'en_US';
$nf = new NumberFormatter($locale, NumberFormatter::ORDINAL);
echo $nf->format($number);

Note that this functionality is only available in PHP 5.3.0 and later.

share|improve this answer
13  
Note this also requires PECL intl >= 1.0.0 – rymo Nov 30 '12 at 19:57
1  
Do you know if it is possible to get the ordinal number in word form? i.e. first, second, third, etc. instead of 1st, 2nd, 3rd... – its_me Oct 16 '13 at 19:05
    
@jeremy When I tried to use NumberFormatter, it always throws an error that NumberFomatter file not found. How did you work around this? – Jhn Feb 21 '14 at 1:42
1  
@Jhn you have to install the extension apt-get install php5-intl – Aley May 9 at 9:51
    
@Aley I see. Yii has a built-in formatter that we're using right now. heh – Jhn May 10 at 10:03

from http://www.phpro.org/examples/Ordinal-Suffix.html

<?php

/**
 *
 * @return number with ordinal suffix
 *
 * @param int $number
 *
 * @param int $ss Turn super script on/off
 *
 * @return string
 *
 */
function ordinalSuffix($number, $ss=0)
{

    /*** check for 11, 12, 13 ***/
    if ($number % 100 > 10 && $number %100 < 14)
    {
        $os = 'th';
    }
    /*** check if number is zero ***/
    elseif($number == 0)
    {
        $os = '';
    }
    else
    {
        /*** get the last digit ***/
        $last = substr($number, -1, 1);

        switch($last)
        {
            case "1":
            $os = 'st';
            break;

            case "2":
            $os = 'nd';
            break;

            case "3":
            $os = 'rd';
            break;

            default:
            $os = 'th';
        }
    }

    /*** add super script ***/
    $os = $ss==0 ? $os : '<sup>'.$os.'</sup>';

    /*** return ***/
    return $number.$os;
}
?> 
share|improve this answer

This can be accomplished in a single line by leveraging similar functionality in PHP's built-in date/time functions. I humbly submit:

Solution:

function ordinalSuffix( $n )
{
  return date('S',mktime(1,1,1,1,( (($n>=10)+($n>=20)+($n==0))*10 + $n%10) ));
}

Detailed Explanation:

The built-in date() function has suffix logic for handling nth-day-of-the-month calculations. The suffix is returned when S is given in the format string:

date( 'S' , ? );

Since date() requires a timestamp (for ? above), we'll pass our integer $n as the day parameter to mktime() and use dummy values of 1 for the hour, minute, second, and month:

date( 'S' , mktime( 1 , 1 , 1 , 1 , $n ) );

This actually fails gracefully on values out of range for a day of the month (i.e. $n > 31) but we can add some simple inline logic to cap $n at 29:

date( 'S', mktime( 1, 1, 1, 1, ( (($n>=10)+($n>=20))*10 + $n%10) ));

The only positive value this fails on is $n == 0, but that's easily fixed by adding 10 in that special case:

date( 'S', mktime( 1, 1, 1, 1, ( (($n>=10)+($n>=20)+($n==0))*10 + $n%10) ));

Just wrap it in a function for convenience and off you go!

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for creativity. – Michael J. Calkins Feb 12 '13 at 22:14

Here is a one-liner:

$a = <yournumber>;
echo $a.substr(date('jS', mktime(0,0,0,1,($a%10==0?9:($a%100>20?$a%10:$a%100)),2000)),-2);

Probably the shortest solution. Can of course be wrapped by a function:

function ord($a) {
  // return English ordinal number
  return $a.substr(date('jS', mktime(0,0,0,1,($a%10==0?9:($a%100>20?$a%10:$a%100)),2000)),-2);
}

Regards, Paul

EDIT1: Correction of code for 11 through 13.

EDIT2: Correction of code for 111, 211, ...

EDIT3: Now it works correctly also for multiples of 10.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach, but alas, it doesn't work :-( 30th comes out as 30st. 40th comes out as 40st. etc. – Flukey Jun 24 '10 at 13:59
1  
Yeah, sorry. When I read the question I thought, hey this should be possible by a single line of code. And I just typed it away. As you see from my edits, I'm improving. After the third edit now I think it's quite done. At least all numbers from 1 to 150 print out nicely on my screen. – Paul Jun 24 '10 at 14:02
    
Looks good up to 500! (haven't tested it further than that). Good work! :-) – Flukey Jun 24 '10 at 14:04
    
Thanks! ;) I like these brain-teasing tasks. – Paul Jun 24 '10 at 14:09

I wrote this for PHP4. It's been working ok & it's pretty economical.

function getOrdinalSuffix($number) {
    $number = abs($number);
    $lastChar = substr($number, -1, 1);
    switch ($lastChar) {
        case '1' : return ($number == '11') ? 'th' : 'st';
        case '2' : return ($number == '12') ? 'th' : 'nd';
        case '3' : return ($number == '13') ? 'th' : 'rd'; 
    }
    return 'th';  
}
share|improve this answer

Generically, you can use that and call echo get_placing_string(100);

<?php
function get_placing_string($placing){
    $i=intval($placing%10);
    $place=substr($placing,-2); //For 11,12,13 places

    if($i==1 && $place!='11'){
        return $placing.'st';
    }
    else if($i==2 && $place!='12'){
        return $placing.'nd';
    }

    else if($i==3 && $place!='13'){
        return $placing.'rd';
    }
    return $placing.'th';
}
?>
share|improve this answer

you just need to apply given function.

function addOrdinalNumberSuffix($num) {
  if (!in_array(($num % 100),array(11,12,13))){
    switch ($num % 10) {
      // Handle 1st, 2nd, 3rd
      case 1:  return $num.'st';
      case 2:  return $num.'nd';
      case 3:  return $num.'rd';
    }
  }
  return $num.'th';
}
share|improve this answer

I made a function that does not rely on the PHP's date(); function as it's not necessary, but also made it as compact and as short as I think is currently possible.

The code: (121 bytes total)

function ordinal($i) { // PHP 5.2 and later
  return($i.(($j=abs($i)%100)>10&&$j<14?'th':(($j%=10)>0&&$j<4?['st', 'nd', 'rd'][$j-1]:'th')));
}

More compact code below.

It works as follows:

printf("The %s hour.\n",    ordinal(0));   // The 0th hour.
printf("The %s ossicle.\n", ordinal(1));   // The 1st ossicle.
printf("The %s cat.\n",     ordinal(12));  // The 12th cat.
printf("The %s item.\n",    ordinal(-23)); // The -23rd item.

Stuff to know about this function:

  • It deals with negative integers the same as positive integers and keeps the sign.
  • It returns 11th, 12th, 13th, 811th, 812th, 813th, etc. for the -teen numbers as expected.
  • It does not check decimals, but will leave them in place (use floor($i), round($i), or ceil($i) at the beginning of the final return statement).
  • You could also add format_number($i) at the beginning of the final return statement to get a comma-separated integer (if you're displaying thousands, millions, etc.).
  • You could just remove the $i from the beginning of the return statement if you only want to return the ordinal suffix without what you input.

This function works commencing PHP 5.2 released November 2006 purely because of the short array syntax. If you have a version before this, then please upgrade because you're nearly a decade out of date! Failing that, just replace the in-line ['st', 'nd', 'rd'] with a temporary variable containing array('st', 'nd', 'rd');.

The same function (without returning the input), but an exploded view of my short function for better understanding:

function ordinal($i) {
  $j = abs($i); // make negatives into positives
  $j = $j%100; // modulo 100; deal only with ones and tens; 0 through 99

  if($j>10 && $j<14) // if $j is over 10, but below 14 (so we deal with 11 to 13)
    return('th'); // always return 'th' for 11th, 13th, 62912th, etc.

  $j = $j%10; // modulo 10; deal only with ones; 0 through 9

  if($j==1) // 1st, 21st, 31st, 971st
    return('st');

  if($j==2) // 2nd, 22nd, 32nd, 582nd
    return('nd'); // 

  if($j==3) // 3rd, 23rd, 33rd, 253rd
    return('rd');

  return('th'); // everything else will suffixed with 'th' including 0th
}

Code Update:

Here's a modified version that is 14 whole bytes shorter (107 bytes total):

function ordinal($i) {
  return $i.(($j=abs($i)%100)>10&&$j<14?'th':@['th','st','nd','rd'][$j%10]?:'th');
}

Or for as short as possible being 25 bytes shorter (96 bytes total):

function o($i){return $i.(($j=abs($i)%100)>10&&$j<14?'th':@['th','st','nd','rd'][$j%10]?:'th');}

With this last function, simply call o(121); and it'll do exactly the same as the other functions I listed.

Code Update #2:

Ben and I worked together and cut it down by 38 bytes (83 bytes total):

function o($i){return$i.@(($j=abs($i)%100)>10&&$j<14?th:[th,st,nd,rd][$j%10]?:th);}

We don't think it can possibly get any shorter than this! Willing to be proven wrong, however. :)

Hope you all enjoy.

share|improve this answer

Found an answer in PHP.net

<?php
function ordinal($num)
{
    // Special case "teenth"
    if ( ($num / 10) % 10 != 1 )
    {
        // Handle 1st, 2nd, 3rd
        switch( $num % 10 )
        {
            case 1: return $num . 'st';
            case 2: return $num . 'nd';
            case 3: return $num . 'rd';  
        }
    }
    // Everything else is "nth"
    return $num . 'th';
}
?>
share|improve this answer

An even shorter version for dates in the month (up to 31) instead of using mktime() and not requiring pecl intl:

function ordinal($n) {
    return (new DateTime('Jan '.$n))->format('jS');
}

or procedurally:

echo date_format(date_create('Jan '.$n), 'jS');

This works of course because the default month I picked (January) has 31 days.

Interestingly enough if you try it with February (or another month without 31 days), it restarts before the end:

...clip...
31st
1st
2nd
3rd

so you could count up to this month's days with the date specifier t in your loop: number of days in the month.

share|improve this answer

Simple and Easy Answer will be:

$Day = 3; 
echo date("S", mktime(0, 0, 0, 0, $Day, 0));

//OUTPUT - rd
share|improve this answer
    
Doesnt work reliably for numbers >32 – cronoklee Feb 2 at 21:15
    
31st is the last day in date on calender and not 32. We are doing here for date. – WhiteHorse Feb 3 at 8:02
    
Doesnt say anything about dates in the question tho. I upvoted anyway - it's a quick and simple solution when you know the number range is going to be <32 – cronoklee Feb 3 at 12:27

To further simplify Lacopo's answer, you can use the following function which gets the last digit of the number using substr() function and uses it as $ends array's index.

function get_ordinal($number)
{
    $ends=array('th','st','nd','rd','th','th','th','th','th','th');
    $last_digit=substr($number, -1, 1);
    return $number.$ends[$last_digit];
}

Edit

My above function seems to be failing for the numbers ending with 11, 12, 13 which I didn't notice while posting the answer. So use Lacopo's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
This is incorrect - it would break on the "teens"... 10th 11st 12nd 13rd 14th – Tom Dyer Jan 22 at 17:57
    
@TomDyer Thanks for notifying me. I didn't notice it earlier. Now I understand why Lacopo has used if ((($number % 100) >= 11) && (($number%100) <= 13)) – Bilal Shareef Jan 25 at 12:51

I fond this small snippet

<?php

  function addOrdinalNumberSuffix($num) {
    if (!in_array(($num % 100),array(11,12,13))){
      switch ($num % 10) {
        // Handle 1st, 2nd, 3rd
        case 1:  return $num.'st';
        case 2:  return $num.'nd';
        case 3:  return $num.'rd';
      }
    }
    return $num.'th';
  }

?>

HERE

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not quite sure what this answer offers in addition to ChintanThummar's answer. Well, it hints that ChintanThummar made a copyright violation, unless he wrote the code at your source... – Andreas Rejbrand Feb 4 '15 at 21:11

protected by Praveen Kumar Mar 3 '14 at 22:08

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