Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a string as follows:

names = "name:fred, name:wilma, name:barney, name2:gauss, name2:riemann"

let's say the string names has name and name2 attributes.

How do I write a function, is_name_attribute(), that checks if a value is a name attribute? That is is_name_attribute('fred') should return True, whereas is_name_attribute('gauss') should return False.

Also, how do I create a comma separated string comprising of only the name attributes i.e.,

"fred, wilma, barney" 
share|improve this question
    
Did you mean "is_name_attribute('gauss')" in your example? – Constantin Jun 24 '10 at 13:07
    
@Constantin: good call; I've updated. – FunLovinCoder Jun 24 '10 at 13:36
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Something like this:

>>> names = "name:fred, name:wilma, name:barney, name2:gauss, name2:riemann"
>>> pairs = [x.split(':') for x in names.split(", ")]
>>> attrs = [x[1] for x in pairs if x[0]=='name']
>>> attrs 
['fred', 'wilma', 'barney']
>>> def is_name_attribute(x):
...     return x in attrs
...
>>> is_name_attribute('fred')
True
>>> is_name_attribute('gauss')
False
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For oh-so-idiomatic python – Jamie Wong Jun 24 '10 at 13:00
    
Thanks very much! – FunLovinCoder Jun 24 '10 at 13:59

There are other ways of doing this (as you'll see from the answers) but perhaps it's time to learn some Python list magic.

>>> names = "name:fred, name:wilma, name:barney, name2:gauss, name2:riemann"
>>> names_list = [pair.split(':') for pair in names.split(', ')]
>>> names_list
[['name', 'fred'], ['name', 'wilma'], ['name', 'barney'], ['name2', 'gauss'], ['name2', 'riemann']]

From there, it's just a case of checking. If you're looking for a certain name:

for pair in names_list:
    if pair[0] == 'name' and pair[1] == 'fred':
        return true
return false

And joining just the name versions:

>>> new_name_list = ','.join([pair[1] for pair in names_list if pair[0] == 'name'])
>>> new_name_list
'fred,wilma,barney'
share|improve this answer

Simple regexp matching:

>>> names = re.compile ('name:([^,]+)', 'g')
>>> names2 = re.compile ('name2:([^,]+)', 'g')
>>> str = "name:fred, name:wilma, name:barney, name2:gauss, name2:riemann"
>>> 'fred' in names.findall(str)
True
>>> names.findall(str)
['fred', 'wilma', 'barney']
share|improve this answer

I think writing als this stuff in a String is not the best solution, but:

import re

names = "name:fred, name:wilma, name:barney, name2:gauss, name2:riemann"

def is_name_attribute(names, name):
    list = names.split()
    compiler = re.compile('^name:(.*)$')
    for line in list:
        line = line.replace(',','')
        match = compiler.match(line)
        if match:
            if name == match.group(1):
                return True
    return False

def commaseperated(names):
    list = names.split()
    compiler = re.compile('^name:(.*)$')
    commasep = ""
    for line in list:
        line = line.replace(',','')
        match = compiler.match(line)
        if match:
            commasep += match.group(1) + ', '
    return commasep[:-2]

print is_name_attribute(names, 'fred')
print is_name_attribute(names, 'gauss')
print commaseperated(names)
share|improve this answer
    
that really hurts – unbeli Jun 24 '10 at 13:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.