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Consider the following switch statement:

switch( value )
{
  case 1:
    return 1;
  default:
    value++;
    // fall-through
  case 2:
    return value * 2;
}

This code compiles, but is it valid (= defined behavior) for C90/C99? I have never seen code where the default case is not the last case.

EDIT:
As Jon Cage and KillianDS write: this is really ugly and confusing code and I am well aware of it. I am just interested in the general syntax (is it defined?) and the expected output.

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8  
+1 Never even considered that behaviour –  Jamie Wong Jun 24 '10 at 12:59
    
@Péter Török: you mean if value == 2 it will return 6 ? –  Alexandre C. Jun 24 '10 at 13:03
3  
@Péter Török no, the order does not matter - if value matches the constant in any case label, then control will jump to that statement following the label, otherwise control will jump to the statement following the default label if present. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 24 '10 at 13:10
7  
@Jon Cage goto isn't evil. Cargo cult followers are! You could not imagine to what extremes people can go to avoid goto because it is alledgedly so evil, making a real unreadable mess of their code. –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 13:34
3  
I use goto mainly to simulate something like a finally clause in functions, where ressources (files, memory) have to be released when stopping, and repeating for every error case a list of free and close doesn't help for readability. There's though one use of goto that I'd like to avoid but can't, is when I want to break out of a loop and I'm within a switch in that loop. –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 14:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 37 down vote accepted

The C99 standard is not explicit about this, but taking all facts together, it is perfectly valid.

A case and default label are equivalent to a goto label. See 6.8.1 Labeled statements. Especially interesting is 6.8.1.4, which enables the already mentioned Duff's Device:

Any statement may be preceded by a prefix that declares an identifier as a label name. Labels in themselves do not alter the flow of control, which continues unimpeded across them.

Edit: The code within a switch is nothing special; it is a normal block of code as in an if-statement, with additional jump labels. This explains the fall-through behaviour and why break is necessary.

6.8.4.2.7 even gives an example:

switch (expr) 
{ 
    int i = 4; 
    f(i); 
case 0: 
    i=17; 
    /*falls through into default code */ 
default: 
    printf("%d\n", i); 
} 

In the artificial program fragment the object whose identifier is i exists with automatic storage duration (within the block) but is never initialized, and thus if the controlling expression has a nonzero value, the call to the printf function will access an indeterminate value. Similarly, the call to the function f cannot be reached.

The case constants must be unique within a switch statement:

6.8.4.2.3 The expression of each case label shall be an integer constant expression and no two of the case constant expressions in the same switch statement shall have the same value after conversion. There may be at most one default label in a switch statement.

All cases are evaluated, then it jumps to the default label, if given:

6.8.4.2.5 The integer promotions are performed on the controlling expression. The constant expression in each case label is converted to the promoted type of the controlling expression. If a converted value matches that of the promoted controlling expression, control jumps to the statement following the matched case label. Otherwise, if there is a default label, control jumps to the labeled statement. If no converted case constant expression matches and there is no default label, no part of the switch body is executed.

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4  
@HeathHunnicutt You clearly didn't understand the purpose of the example. The code isn't made up by this poster, but taken straight from the C standard, as an illustration of how weird switch statements are, and how bad practice will lead to bugs. If you had bothered to read the text below the code, you'd realize as much. –  Lundin Nov 13 '13 at 14:49
2  
+1 to compensate for the downvote. Downvoting someone from citing the C standard seems quite harsh. –  Lundin Nov 13 '13 at 14:50
    
@Lundin I'm not down-voting the C standard, and I didn't overlook anything as you suggest. I down-voted the bad pedagogy of using a bad, and unneeded, example. In particular, that example relates to a different situation entirely than was asked about. I could go on, but "thanks for your feedback." –  Heath Hunnicutt Nov 13 '13 at 15:34

The case statements and the default statement can occur in any order in the switch statement. The default clause is an optional clause that is matched if none of the constants in the case statements can be matched.

Good Example :-

switch(5) {
  case 1:
    echo "1";
    break;
  case 2:
  default:
    echo "2, default";
    break;
  case 3;
    echo "3";
    break;
}


Outputs '2,default'

very useful if you want your cases to be presented in a logical order in the code (as in, not saying case 1, case 3, case 2/default) and your cases are very long so you do not want to repeat the entire case code at the bottom for the default

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1  
This is exactly the scenario where I usually place default somewhere other than the end... there's a logical order to the explicit cases (1, 2, 3) and I want the default to behave exactly the same as one of the explicit cases that isn't the last one. –  ArtOfWarfare Dec 18 '12 at 16:10

It's valid and very useful in some cases.

Consider the following code:

switch(poll(fds, 1, 1000000)){
   default:
    // here goes the normal case : some events occured
   break;
   case 0:
    // here goes the timeout case
   break;
   case -1:
     // some error occurred, you have to check errno
}

The point is that the above code is more readable and efficient than cascaded if. You could put default at the end, but it is pointless as it will focus your attention on error cases instead of normal cases (which here is the default case).

Actually, it's not such a good example, in poll you know how many events may occur at most. My real point is that there is cases with a defined set of input values where there is 'exceptions' and normal case. If it's better to put exceptions or normal cases at front is a matter of choice.

In software field I think of another very usual case : recursions with some terminal values. If you can express it using a switch, default will be the usual value that contains recursive call and distinguished elements (individual cases) the terminal values. There is usually no need to focus on terminal values.

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3  
+1 for giving a (good) example without the fallthrough behaviour. –  KillianDS Jun 24 '10 at 13:30
    
+1: Good example –  Jon Cage Jun 24 '10 at 13:37
1  
...thinking about it though, I'm not convinced having the default at the top is good because very few people would be looking for it there. It might be better to assign the return to a variable and handle success in one side of an if and errors in the other side with a case statement. –  Jon Cage Jun 24 '10 at 13:43
    
@Jon: just write it. You add syntaxic noise without any readability benefit. And, if default is at top, there is really no need to look at it, it's really obvious (it could be more tricky if you put it in the middle). –  kriss Jun 24 '10 at 14:27
    
+1 for making it useful. –  Tim Post Jun 24 '10 at 14:49

yes, this is valid, and under some circumstances it is even useful. Generally, if you don't need it, don't do it.

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-1: This smells of evil to me. It would be better to split the code into a pair of switch statements. –  Jon Cage Jun 24 '10 at 13:08
8  
@John Cage: putting me a -1 here is nasty. It is not my fault that this is valid code. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 24 '10 at 13:21
    
just curious, I would like to know under which circumstances it is useful? –  Salil Jun 24 '10 at 13:27
    
The -1 was aimed at your assertion of it being useful. I'll change it to a +1 if you can provide a valid example to back up your claim. –  Jon Cage Jun 24 '10 at 13:33
3  
Sometimes when switching for an errno that we got in return from some system function. Say we have one case where we know for good that we have to do a clean exit, but this clean exit might require some lines of coding that we don't want to repeat. But suppose also we also have a lot of other exotic error codes that we don't want to handle individually. I would consider just putting a perror in the default case and let it run through to the other case and exit cleanly. I don't say you should do it like that. It is just a matter of taste. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 24 '10 at 14:19

There's no defined order in a switch statement. You may look at the cases as something like a named label, like a goto label. Contrary to what people seem to think here, in the case of value 2 the default label is not jumped to. To illustrate with a classical example, here is Duff's device, which is the poster child of the extremes of switch/case in C.

send(to, from, count)
register short *to, *from;
register count;
{
  register n=(count+7)/8;
  switch(count%8){
    case 0: do{ *to = *from++;
    case 7:     *to = *from++;
    case 6:     *to = *from++;
    case 5:     *to = *from++;
    case 4:     *to = *from++;
    case 3:     *to = *from++;
    case 2:     *to = *from++;
    case 1:     *to = *from++;
            }while(--n>0);
  }
}
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And for anyone who's not familiar with Duff's device this code is completely unreadable... –  KillianDS Jun 24 '10 at 13:34

One scenario where I would consider it appropriate to have a 'default' located somewhere other than the end of a case statement is in a state machine where an invalid state should reset the machine and proceed as though it were the initial state. For example:

switch(widget_state)
{
  default:  /* Fell off the rails--reset and continue */
    widget_state = WIDGET_START;
    /* Fall through */
  case WIDGET_START:
    ...
    break;
  case WIDGET_WHATEVER:
    ...
    break;
}

an alternative arrangement, if an invalid state should not reset the machine but should be readily identifiable as an invalid state:

switch(widget_state) { case WIDGET_IDLE: widget_ready = 0; widget_hardware_off(); break; case WIDGET_START: ... break; case WIDGET_WHATEVER: ... break; default: widget_state = WIDGET_INVALID_STATE; /* Fall through */ case WIDGET_INVALID_STATE: widget_ready = 0; widget_hardware_off(); ... do whatever else is necessary to establish a "safe" condition }

Code elsewhere may then check for (widget_state == WIDGET_INVALID_STATE) and provide whatever error-reporting or state-reset behavior seems appropriate. For example, the status-bar code could show an error icon, and the "start widget" menu option which is disabled in most non-idle states could be enabled for WIDGET_INVALID_STATE as well as WIDGET_IDLE.

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The "default" condition can be anyplace within the switch that a case clause can exist. It is not required to be the last clause. I have seen code that put the default as the first clause. The "case 2:" gets executed normally, even though the default clause is above it.

As a test, I put the sample code in a function, called test(int value){} and ran:

  printf("0=%d\n", test(0));
  printf("1=%d\n", test(1));
  printf("2=%d\n", test(2));
  printf("3=%d\n", test(3));
  printf("4=%d\n", test(4));

The output is:

0=2
1=1
2=4
3=8
4=10
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There are cases when you are converting ENUM to a string or converting string to enum in case where you are writing/reading to/from a file.

You sometimes need to make one of the values default to cover errors made by manually editing files.

switch(textureMode)
{
case ModeTiled:
default:
    // write to a file "tiled"
    break;

case ModeStretched:
    // write to a file "stretched"
    break;
}
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It's valid, but rather nasty. I would suggest it's generally bad to allow fall-throughs as it can lead to some very messy spaghetti code.

It's almost certainly better to break these cases up into several switch statements or smaller functions.

[edit] @Tristopia: Your example:

Example from UCS-2 to UTF-8 conversion 

r is the destination array, 
wc is the input wchar_t  

switch(utf8_length) 
{ 
    /* Note: code falls through cases! */ 
    case 3: r[2] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0x800; 
    case 2: r[1] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0x0c0; 
    case 1: r[0] = wc;
}

would be clearer as to it's intention (I think) if it were written like this:

if( utf8_length >= 1 )
{
    r[0] = wc;

    if( utf8_length >= 2 )
    {
        r[1] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0x0c0; 

        if( utf8_length == 3 )
        {
            r[2] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0x800; 
        }
    }
}   

[edit2] @Tristopia: Your second example is probably the cleanest example of a good use for follow-through:

for(i=0; s[i]; i++)
{
    switch(s[i])
    {
    case '"': 
    case '\'': 
    case '\\': 
        d[dlen++] = '\\'; 
        /* fall through */ 
    default: 
        d[dlen++] = s[i]; 
    } 
}

..but personally I would split the comment recognition into it's own function:

bool isComment(char charInQuestion)
{   
    bool charIsComment = false;
    switch(charInQuestion)
    {
    case '"': 
    case '\'': 
    case '\\': 
        charIsComment = true; 
    default: 
        charIsComment = false; 
    } 
    return charIsComment;
}

for(i=0; s[i]; i++)
{
    if( isComment(s[i]) )
    {
        d[dlen++] = '\\'; 
    }
    d[dlen++] = s[i]; 
}
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1  
There are cases where fall through is really, really a good idea. –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 13:22
    
Show me.. (15 char limit) –  Jon Cage Jun 24 '10 at 13:34
    
Example from UCS-2 to UTF-8 conversion r is the destination array, wc is the input wchar_t switch(utf8_length) { /* Note: code falls through cases! */ case 3: r[2] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0x800; case 2: r[1] = 0x80 | (wc & 0x3f); wc >>= 6; wc |= 0xc0; case 1: r[0] = wc; } –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 13:42
    
Here another, a string copy routine with character escaping: for(i=0; s[i]; i++) { switch(s[i]) { case '"': case '\'': case '\\': d[dlen++] = '\\'; /* fall through */ default: d[dlen++] = s[i]; } } –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 13:53
1  
Yes there were, especially in conversions in Bulgarian and Greek (on Solaris SPARC) and text with our internal markup (which is 3 byte UTF8). Admitted, in toto it's not much and has become irrelevant since our last hardware update, but at the time it was written it made some difference. –  tristopia Jun 24 '10 at 14:25

Chiming in with another example: This can be useful if "default" is an unexpected case, and you want to log the error but also do something sensible. Example from some of my own code:

  switch (style)
  {
  default:
    MSPUB_DEBUG_MSG(("Couldn't match dash style, using solid line.\n"));
  case SOLID:
    return Dash(0, RECT_DOT);
  case DASH_SYS:
  {
    Dash ret(shapeLineWidth, dotStyle);
    ret.m_dots.push_back(Dot(1, 3 * shapeLineWidth));
    return ret;
  }
  // more cases follow
  }
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