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I'd like to create new item that similarly to Util.Map.Entry
i.e. that will already contain the structure key,value
The problem is that I can't use Map.Entry itself because apperently it's a read-only object that I can't instanciate new instance of it.
Does anyone know how to create new generic key/value object?

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What do you want to use that object for? You can create your own class that has 2 variables, key and value, then you can implement your own methods (getters and setters etc) around that?? –  DaveJohnston Jun 24 '10 at 13:54
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7 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can just implement the Map.Entry<K, V> interface yourself:

import java.util.Map;

final class MyEntry<K, V> implements Map.Entry<K, V> {
    private final K key;
    private V value;

    public MyEntry(K key, V value) {
        this.key = key;
        this.value = value;
    }

    @Override
    public K getKey() {
        return key;
    }

    @Override
    public V getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public V setValue(V value) {
        V old = this.value;
        this.value = value;
        return old;
    }
}

And then use it:

Map.Entry<String, Object> entry = new MyEntry<String, Object>("Hello", 123);
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7  
of course - I just wondered if there isn't out-of-the-box solution to it. I am trying to make my code as standard as possible... –  Spiderman Jun 24 '10 at 14:04
1  
Your example instantiation will generate a raw-type warning! –  Nels Beckman Jun 24 '10 at 14:12
    
@Nels - thanks, fixed –  Jesper Jun 24 '10 at 14:36
2  
@Spiderman And how is implementing Map.Entry not standard? –  Steve Kuo Jun 24 '10 at 17:09
    
Can you please explain why some implementations of Map has key as final (like in HashMap,ConcurrentHashMap), but not in some other implemementations like TreeMap,WeakHashMap? –  AKS Aug 29 '13 at 17:26
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There's public static class AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<K,V>. Don't let the Abstract part of the name mislead you: it is in fact NOT an abstract class (but its top-level AbstractMap is).

The fact that it's a static nested class means that you DON'T need an enclosing AbstractMap instance to instantiate it, so something like this compiles fine:

Map.Entry<String,Integer> entry =
    new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<String, Integer>("exmpleString", 42);

As noted in another answer, Guava also has a convenient static factory method Maps.immutableEntry that you can use.


You said:

I can't use Map.Entry itself because apparently it's a read-only object that I can't instantiate new instanceof

That's not entirely accurate. The reason why you can't instantiate it directly (i.e. with new) is because it's an interface Map.Entry.


Caveat and tip

As noted in the documentation, AbstractMap.SimpleEntry is @since 1.6, so if you're stuck to 5.0, then it's not available to you.

To look for another known class that implements Map.Entry, you can in fact go directly to the javadoc. From the Java 6 version

Interface Map.Entry

All Known Implementing Classes:

Unfortunately the 1.5 version does not list any known implementing class that you can use, so you may have be stuck with implementing your own.

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The above line returns compilation error for me (I am using java 5, BTW) - error message is: 'The type AbstractMap.SimpleEntry is not visible' –  Spiderman Jun 24 '10 at 14:01
3  
That's because AbstractMap.SimpleEntry wasn't public until Java 6, as you can see in the documentation. –  Jesper Jun 24 '10 at 14:02
    
OK, so to summarise the short discussion - there is no out-of-the-box solution to it in Java 5 - I should use my own implementation to it. –  Spiderman Jun 24 '10 at 14:06
    
+1 for pointing out AbstractMap.SimpleEntry. I guess you learn something new every day! –  Priidu Neemre May 10 '13 at 15:20
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Try Maps.immutableEntry from Guava

This has the advantage of being compatible with Java 5 (unlike AbstractMap.SimpleEntry which requires Java 6.)

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+1 for Guava. Need more adopters. –  polygenelubricants Jun 24 '10 at 14:17
1  
This is part of 3rd party library (of google?) and not part of Java JRE. –  Spiderman Jul 6 '10 at 8:16
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Why Map.Entry? I guess something like a key-value pair is fit for the case.

Use java.util.AbstractMap.SimpleImmutableEntry or java.util.AbstractMap.SimpleEntry

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I defined a generic Pair class that I use all the time. It's great. As a bonus, by defining a static factory method (Pair.create) I only have to write the type arguments half as often.

public class Pair<A, B> {

    private A component1;
    private B component2;

    public Pair() {
            super();
    }

    public Pair(A component1, B component2) {
            this.component1 = component1;
            this.component2 = component2;
    }

    public A fst() {
            return component1;
    }

    public void setComponent1(A component1) {
            this.component1 = component1;
    }

    public B snd() {
            return component2;
    }

    public void setComponent2(B component2) {
            this.component2 = component2;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
            return "<" + component1 + "," + component2 + ">";
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            result = prime * result
                            + ((component1 == null) ? 0 : component1.hashCode());
            result = prime * result
                            + ((component2 == null) ? 0 : component2.hashCode());
            return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                    return true;
            if (obj == null)
                    return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                    return false;
            final Pair<?, ?> other = (Pair<?, ?>) obj;
            if (component1 == null) {
                    if (other.component1 != null)
                            return false;
            } else if (!component1.equals(other.component1))
                    return false;
            if (component2 == null) {
                    if (other.component2 != null)
                            return false;
            } else if (!component2.equals(other.component2))
                    return false;
            return true;
    }

    public static <A, B> Pair<A, B> create(A component1, B component2) {
            return new Pair<A, B>(component1, component2);
    }

}

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Sorry, I posted this before reading all of the other comments. Looks like you want something that's included in the standard lib... –  Nels Beckman Jun 24 '10 at 14:11
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org.apache.commons.lang3.tuple.Pair implements java.util.Map.Entry and can also be used standalone.

Also as others mentioned Guava's com.google.common.collect.Maps.immutableEntry(K, V) does the trick.

I prefer Pair for its fluent Pair.of(L, R) syntax.

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public A fst() {
        return component1;
}

public void setComponent1(A component1) {
        this.component1 = component1;
}

public B snd() {
        return component2;
}

public void setComponent2(B component2) {
        this.component2 = component2;
}
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