Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to limit speed of outgoing response from php script? So I have a script generating data in keep-alive connection. It just opens file and reads it. How to limit outgoing speed

(By now i have such code)

if(isset($_GET[FILE]))
 {
  $fileName = $_GET[FILE];
  $file =  $fileName;

  if (!file_exists($file))
  {
   print('<b>ERROR:</b> php could not find (' . $fileName . ') please check your settings.'); 
   exit();
  }
  if(file_exists($file))
  {
   # stay clean
   @ob_end_clean();
   @set_time_limit(0);

   # keep binary data safe
   set_magic_quotes_runtime(0);

   $fh = fopen($file, 'rb') or die ('<b>ERROR:</b> php could not open (' . $fileName . ')');
   # content headers
   header("Content-Type: video/x-flv"); 

   # output file
   while(!feof($fh)) 
   {
     # output file without bandwidth limiting
     print(fread($fh, filesize($file))); 
   } 
  } 
 }

So what shall I do to limit speed of response (limit to for example 50 kb/s)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Change your file output to be staggered rather that outputting the whole file in one go.

# output file
while(!feof($fh)) 
{
    # output file without bandwidth limiting
    print(fread($fh, 51200)); # 51200 bytes = 50 kB
    sleep(1);
}

This will output 50kB then wait one second until the whole file is output. It should cap the bandwidth to around 50kB/second.

Even though this is possible within PHP, I'd use your web-server to control the throttling.

share|improve this answer
1  
flushing the buffer after printing will ensure a steady stream of writes every second, though isn't strictly necessary. –  Chadwick Jun 24 '10 at 14:25
    
please add right comments and flush so to consider this answer fully true. –  Rella Jun 25 '10 at 9:12

I wouldn't use php to limit the bandwidth:

For Apache: Bandwidth Mod v0.7 (How-To - Bandwidth Limiter For Apache2)

For Nginx: http://wiki.nginx.org/NginxHttpCoreModule#limit_rate

For Lighttpd: http://redmine.lighttpd.net/projects/lighttpd/wiki/Docs:TrafficShaping This even allows you to configure the speed per connection in PHP

share|improve this answer

You can read n bytes and then use use sleep(1) to wait a second, as suggested here.

share|improve this answer

I think the method of 'Ben S' and 'igorw' is wrong because they imply unlimited bandwidth which is a false assumption. Basically a script that says

while(!feof($fh)) {
   print(fread($fh, $chunk_size));
   sleep(1);
}

will pause for a second after outputting $chunk_size number of bytes regardless of how long it took. If for example if your current throughput is 100kb and you want to stream at 250kb, the script above will take 2.5 seconds to do the print() and then wait yet another second, effectively pushing the real bandwidth down to around 70kb.

The solution should either measure the time it took for PHP to complete the print() statemnt or use a buffer and call flush with every fread(). The first approach would be:

list($usec, $sec) = explode(' ', microtime());
$time_start = ((float)$usec + (float)$sec);
# output packet
print(fread($fh, $packet_size));
# get end time
list($usec, $sec) = explode(' ', microtime());
$time_stop = ((float)$usec + (float)$sec);
# wait if output is slower than $packet_interval
$time_difference = $time_stop - $time_start;
if($time_difference < (float)$packet_interval) {
    usleep((float)$packet_interval*1000000-(float)$time_difference*1000000);
}

while the second would be something like:

ob_start();
while(!feof($fh)) {
       print(fread($fh, $chunk_size));
       flush();
       ob_flush();
       sleep(1);
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.