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In my program, I've redirected stdout to print to a file 'console.txt'. A function writes to that file like this:

void printToConsole(const std::string& text, const TCODColor& fc, const TCODColor& bc)
    {
        // write the string
        cout << text << "@";

        // write the two color values
        cout << static_cast<int>(fc.r) << " "
             << static_cast<int>(fc.g) << " " 
             << static_cast<int>(fc.b) << " "
             << static_cast<int>(bc.r) << " "
             << static_cast<int>(bc.g) << " " 
             << static_cast<int>(bc.b) << " " << endl;
    }

I have a function that reads from that file that looks like this:

   void Console::readLogFile()
   {
        ifstream log("console.txt", ifstream::in);
        if(!log.is_open())
        {
            cerr << "ERROR: console.txt not found!" << endl;
            return;
        }

        // read new input into the stack
        char str[256];
        while(!log.eof())
        {
            log.getline(str, 256);
            cerr << "str: " << str << endl;
            stk.push(static_cast<string>(str));
            // stk is a std::stack<std::string> member of the class this function
            // belongs to.
        }
        cerr << endl;

        /* Do some stuff with str and stk here */

        log.close();
        clearLogFile();
    }

    void Console::clearLogFile()
    {
        FILE* log;
        log = fopen("console.txt", "w");
        fclose(log);
    }

Often, console.txt is empty when readLogFile is called. I would expect that the while(!log.eof()) loop would never execute in that case, but it does. There is always at least one extraneous blank line in the file, sometimes two, and when input is read from the file, the input line is sandwiched between two blank lines. After a few calls to this function, the while(!log.eof()) loop then goes into an infinite loop pulling blank lines from the file. A typical runthrough of the program looks like this:

str: 

str: Player moved.@191 191 191 0 0 0
str: 

str: 
str: Player moved.@191 191 191 0 0 0 
str: 

str: // there should be a 'Player moved.' line in here
str:

str: // here as well
str:

str: // also here
str:

str: 
str: Player moved.@191 191 191 0 0 0 
str: 

str:
str:
str:
str:
str:
str:
(onto infinite loop)

Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong here?

EDIT: As Amardeep suggested, I changed the while(!log.eof()) loop to a do{...}while(!log.fail); loop. This fixed the infinite loop problem, but not the extraneous lines. The program behaves as before, except where it once went into the infinite loop, it now reads nothing but blank lines where it should read input, like this:

str:

str:

str:

str: 
(etc.)
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

eof() status is not set until you attempt a read. You should change your read loop to do the getline() then check the fail() status instead of relying on eof(), which doesn't cover the breadth of things that can go wrong trying to read the file.

share|improve this answer
    
I changed the while(!log.eof()) to a do{...}while(!log.fail()); loop, and this fixed the infinite loop problem but it's still reading in extraneous blank lines. –  Max Jun 24 '10 at 19:17
    
You need to check for fail after reading but before calling push. If you don't want an ugly if statement in the middle of your loop, you could do this by changing your code to be log.getline(str, 256);while(!log.fail()) {cerr << "str: " << str << endl;stk.push(static_cast<string>(str));log.getline(str, 256);} –  Brian Jun 24 '10 at 19:24
    
This almost fixed my problem. The read loop is okay now, I believe, the problem is now with my clearLogFile function. If I comment it out, it all behaves as I would expect (although it reads old data since the file isn't cleared out), with it still in, there are extraneous blank lines before each line of real input, and after a while it stops reading in input all together (apparently the check for fail returns true right off the bat). –  Max Jun 24 '10 at 19:53
    
I would suggest changing your clearLogFile() function to use streams instead of the C library calls. There might be some caching that is causing a race condition between the streams close and the fopen(). ofstream("console.txt", ios_base::trunc); should do it. –  Amardeep Jun 24 '10 at 20:08
    
Nope, still the same. Changed anyway, just for consistency. EDIT: now that you mentioned it, though, I redirected stdout by calling freopen() on a FILE pointer. Could this have something to do with it? Is there a way to redirect stdout using streams? I couldn't find any with a cursory google search. –  Max Jun 24 '10 at 20:17
show 5 more comments

Standard anti patter for reading a file.

    while(!log.eof())
    {
        log.getline(str, 256);
        cerr << "str: " << str << endl;
        stk.push(static_cast<string>(str));
        // stk is a std::stack<std::string> member of the class this function
        // belongs to.
    }

try this:

    while(log.getline(str, 256))
    {
        cerr << "str: " << str << endl;
        stk.push(string(str));
    }

This works because the getline() method returns a reference to the stream.

When a stream is used in a boolean context it gets converted into a bool (for the pedantic not really but for the beginner as good as). If the stream is still in a good state after the read (ie the read worked) then it is converted to true. If the stream is in a bad state (ie the read failed) then it is converted to false. Therefore if the read worked the loop is entered. If the read failed (because maybe EOL is read) then the loop is not entered.

Note your version failed because you did not test the eof() after the read (getline()). The is because the last good read reads all the characters upto the EOF. But this means the eof flag is not set. It is not until you try to actually read past the EOF (this only happens if you read something after the last read read all the other characters) that the EOF flag is set.

PS. There is a free function that reads from a stream into a string.

std::string line;
std::getline(log, line);
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Alright, thanks. This didn't quite fix my problem, but it did make my code better. I'll keep that in mind from now on. –  Max Jun 24 '10 at 21:06
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