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I have the following small function that does not compile:

function f_query_01  Return interval Day to second is 
  start_time timestamp(3);
  end_time timestamp(3);
  time_diff interval Day to second;  
  c_query_number number;

begin

  start_time := systimestamp; 
  select count(*) into c_query_number from wg;  <--This is the line that errors out
  end_time := systimestamp;
  time_diff := start_time - end_time;

  return time_diff;

end f_query_01;

The compiler gives me the following errors:

Error(29,3): PL/SQL: SQL Statement ignored Error(29,44): PL/SQL: ORA-04044: procedure, function, package, or type is not allowed here

How can I correct this? Thanks!!

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Does select count(*) into c_query_number from wg; work outside of the function, when run in the same database/schema as the function? –  OMG Ponies Jun 24 '10 at 19:35
    
Interesting. It tried this code, substituting wg for another small table. Compiled and ran successfully. Are you sure this is exactly the code that had a problem? –  jim mcnamara Jun 24 '10 at 19:41
2  
The problem was that the table wg did not exist. Once I renamed the table to the correct name all was fine. I really feel the error message was pretty misleading in this case, which happens, but it is still frustrating. –  twamn Jun 24 '10 at 20:50
    
The "Statement ignored" message means that the compiler tries to compile the rest as if the mentioned statement wasn't there, so more errors can occur e.g. when there was the beginning of a loop on that line. –  ammoQ Jun 25 '10 at 7:01

2 Answers 2

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION f_query_01
   RETURN NUMBER
IS
BEGIN
   DECLARE
      c_query_number   NUMBER DEFAULT NULL;
      start_time       DATE DEFAULT NULL;
      end_time         DATE DEFAULT NULL;
      time_diff        NUMBER DEFAULT NULL;
   BEGIN
      SELECT CAST (SYSTIMESTAMP AS DATE) INTO start_time FROM DUAL;

      SELECT COUNT (*) INTO c_query_number FROM ws;

      SELECT CAST (SYSTIMESTAMP AS DATE) INTO end_time FROM DUAL;

      time_diff := start_time - end_time;

      RETURN time_diff;
   END;
END f_query_01;
share|improve this answer

It appears the table wg does not exist. When updated to the correct table name the compile works without errors. A message from the compiler of table does not exist would be most helpful.

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3  
Checking google, I have to agree - poor error message. –  OMG Ponies Jun 24 '10 at 19:43
    
I think the reasoning behind the error message is that if the object is not in the data dictionary, then it must be a locally defined object, hence "procedure, function, package, or type", which are all things that can be defined with a function. –  Allan Jun 24 '10 at 20:07
1  
When I compiled the code, I got a 'table does not exist' error. When I compiled it when I had a function called wg, I got the error described. Maybe there was a public synonym to another 'wg' somewhere. –  Gary Myers Jun 24 '10 at 23:31

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