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Here's my hypothetical example. I have a very simple WPF window with a one Button. The Button.Click event has a handler that goes like this.

Action doit = () =>
{
    Action error = () => { throw new InvalidOperationException("test"); };

    try {
        this.Dispatcher.Invoke(error, DispatcherPriority.Normal);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(ex);
        throw;
    }
};
doit.BeginInvoke(null, null);

I would expect that the exception would be caught and written down by the Trace.WriteLine call. Instead, no exception is caught and the application breaks.

Does anybody knows of an possible explanation for this to happen? And what workaround do you suggest in order to catch exceptions thrown by the delegate invoked by Dispatcher.Invoke?

Update 1: I put a throw in the exception handling code. I don't want to actually ignore the exception. The whole point of my question is to handle it correctly. The problem is that the exception handling code is never executed.

Remember that this is an hypothetical example. My real code does not look like that. Also, assume that I can't change the code in the method to be invoked.

Update 2: Consider this similar example. Instead of a WPF window, I have a Windows Forms window. It has a button with the almost exactly the same handler. The only difference is in the invocation code. It goes like this.

this.Invoke(error);

In Windows Forms, the exception handling code is executed. Why the difference?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

UPDATED: To observe the exception in the other thread, you want to use a Task, queue it to the Dispatcher thread (using TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext), and wait on it, as such:

var ui = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
Action doit = () => 
{ 
    var error = Task.Factory.StartNew(
        () => { throw new InvalidOperationException("test"); },
        CancellationToken.None,
        TaskCreationOptions.None,
        ui); 

    try { 
        error.Wait(); 
    } catch (Exception ex) { 
        System.Diagnostics.Trace.WriteLine(ex); 
    } 
}; 
doit.BeginInvoke(null, null); 

UPDATED (again): Since your goal is a reusable component, I do recommend moving to a Task-based interface or something else based on SynchronizationContext such as the event-based asynchronous pattern, instead of basing the component on Dispatcher or ISynchronizeInvoke.

Dispatcher-based components only work on WPF/Silverlight; ISynchronizeInvoke-based components only work on Windows Forms. SynchronizationContext-based components will work with WPF or Windows Forms transparently, and (with a bit more work) ASP.NET, console apps, windows services, etc.

The event-based asynchronous pattern is the old recommended way of writing SynchronizationContext-based components; it's still around for .NET 3.5-era code. If you're on .NET 4, though, the task parallel library is much more flexible, clean, and powerful. The TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext uses SynchronizationContext underneath, and is the New Way to write reusable components that need this kind of synchronization.

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The way I'm dealing with caught exceptions is irrelevant. I could put some logging or whatever there. The problem is that the exception handling code is never executed. –  jpbochi Jun 24 '10 at 20:39
    
That's because the exception is thrown on another thread - the Dispatcher thread. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 24 '10 at 20:40
    
@Sthepen: I know that. I was expecting to get a TargetInvocationException or something like it. –  jpbochi Jun 24 '10 at 20:47
    
Exceptions are not propogated across threads automatically. I posted a sample that uses .NET 4.0 Tasks to propogate the exception. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 24 '10 at 20:49
2  
In that case, I'd actually recommend moving to a Task-based interface or something else based on SynchronizationContext such as the event-based asynchronous pattern. The reason is that SynchronizationContext-based approaches will work with WPF or Windows Forms transparently, and (with a bit more work) ASP.NET, console apps, windows services, etc. So if your goal is a reusable component, stick with SynchronizationContext. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 25 '10 at 0:32

I ran into the same problem and discovered that overloads of Dispatcher.Invoke() behave differently according to how exceptions are rethrown in the callers thread.

In the example code, 2 overloads of Dispatcher.Invoke are called from a non-UI thread. Just to clarify because some mentioned in the above comments: It is completely irrelevant how the non-UI thread is spawned; use ThreadPool, TPL or Thread.Start or whatever, it doesn't matter.

I tested 2 overloads of Invoke:

  • Invoke(DispatcherPriority, Delegate)
  • Invoke(Action, DispatcherPriority)

The 1st overload does NOT propagate exceptions thrown in the delegate to the caller, the 2nd does.

Here is my test code:

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
_ =>
{
    try
    {
        // signature: public object Invoke(DispatcherPriority priority, Delegate method)
        Dispatcher.Invoke(
            DispatcherPriority.Normal,
            new Action(
                () =>
                {
                    throw new Exception("Overload 1");
                }));
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // The exception will NOT be rethrown in the caller thread by the dispatcher.
        // Instead, it remains unhandled in the UI thread and causes the app to crash.
    }
});

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
_ =>
{
    try
    {
        // signature: public void Invoke(Action callback, DispatcherPriority priority)
        Dispatcher.Invoke(
            () =>
            {
                throw new Exception("Overload 2");
            },
            DispatcherPriority.Normal);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // The exception will be rethrown in the caller thread by the dispatcher.
    }
});

Can anybody find documentation on the different behaviors?

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1  
This isnt really an answer, and should be asked in its own question. Its not likely to be seen here. –  Stuart Siegler Apr 9 at 13:24
    
Why? Originally it was asked why exceptions thrown inside a Dispatcher.Invoke aren't propagated to the callers thread. I didn't completely answer the question, but I added more information that can help to clarify in a case that I proposed a workaround (use another overload). –  Ronald Schlenker Apr 9 at 13:32
    
I'm with Stuart on this. Although your answer did add some information to the matter, it wasn't a complete answer. And you even ended the text with an actual question. I advise you to write this as a question and link it to this one. This way, you would be more likely to get an answer, and you would still contribute with information for the initial question. –  jpbochi Apr 16 at 14:10

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