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One of my pet peeves with raising events in C# is the fact that an exception in an event handler will break my code, and possibly prevent other handlers from being called, if the broken one happened to get called first; In most cases my code couldn't care less if somebody else's code that's listening to its events is broken.

I created an extension method that catches exceptions:

public static void Raise(this EventHandler eh, object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  if (eh == null)
    return;
  try
  {
    eh(sender, e);
  }
  catch { }
}

Although this does mean my code carries on regardless, this method doesn't stop a first event handler throwing an exception and preventing second and subsequent handlers being notified of the event. I'm looking into a way of iterating through GetInvocationList to wrap each individual event handler in it's own try/catch, but this seems inefficient, and I'm not certain of the best way to do it, or even if I should be.

Also, I'm really not comfortable simply ignoring the exception here (and neither's FxCop/Resharper for that matter); realistically what should happen to the exception in this case?

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I've often wondered what the best way to handle this is. –  ChaosPandion Jun 24 '10 at 21:00
    
This actually raises another question I'll ask separately; in this question I'm coding from the point of view of the class raising the event, but I'm wondering if event handlers should be allowed to throw exceptions in the first place. stackoverflow.com/questions/3114543/… –  Flynn1179 Jun 24 '10 at 23:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What if you did something like this?

public static void Raise(this EventHandler eh, object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (eh == null)
        return;

    foreach(var handler in eh.GetInvocationList().Cast<EventHandler>())
    {
        try
        {
            handler(sender, e);
        }
        catch { }
    }
}
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Actually, I did foreach (Delegate handler in WeaponChanged.GetInvocationList()) handler(sender, e);, but unfortunately, the handler(sender, e) gives an error in VS, that 'Method, delegate or event is expected' for 'handler'; I'm scratching my head over that one, it's clearly a Delegate. –  Flynn1179 Jun 24 '10 at 21:13
    
@Flynn1179 - Delegate by it self cannot be invoked in that matter. You either need to cast as you see in my example or invoke the delegate like this: handler.DynamicInvoke(sender, e); –  ChaosPandion Jun 24 '10 at 21:16
    
aah.. I'm getting confused between 'delegate' and 'Delegate' :) –  Flynn1179 Jun 24 '10 at 21:26
    
Ok, which is faster- casting and then doing handler(sender, e), or not casting and doing handler.DynamicInvoke(sender, e)? I know I could do this with a quick test, but I'm curious as to WHY one is faster, or perhaps better –  Flynn1179 Jun 24 '10 at 22:31
    
@Flynn1179 - As the name implies calling DynamicInvoke can take any arguments but at run-time the arguments will be validated. Casting the delegates to their proper types will remove the check and will in fact increase performance. Actual numbers are hard to gauge as it depends on how many subscribers you have and how often this event is raised. –  ChaosPandion Jun 24 '10 at 23:11

You should only trap those exceptions you can handle. For example you might be accessing a file and not have sufficient privileges. If you know this can happen occasionally and all that needs to happen is that the case is logged then trap that exception alone.

If your code can't handle the exception then don't trap it.

It's an exceptional circumstance so there's a good chance the other event handlers won't be able to "do their stuff" either, so let it propagate to a level where it can be handled safely.

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If the event handler didn't catch the exception, I don't see any good way you can handle the exception in the class throwing the event. You don't have any context to know what the handler is doing. It's safest to let the app crash hard in this case, as you have no idea what side effects the other event handler may have caused that could destabilize your application. The lesson here is that event handlers must be robust (handle their own exceptions), as classes that fire events should never catch exceptions thrown by the handlers.

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Failing fast is great when you're debugging, but not so much when you're a user. Why should a buggy plug-in crash every app it touches? –  Gabe Jun 24 '10 at 21:09
    
If you have a buggy plug-in and you want a true robust architecture, then you need to isolate the plugin so that it can't harm your application. You can do this with an AppDomain or a separate process. If it's not isolated, then you can't guarantee your state hasn't been corrupted and continuing to run despite an unhandled exception is a recipe for much worse failures down the line. Basically, running incorrectly is worse than not running at all and if you can't be sure that you can still run correctly, it's better to fail. –  Dan Bryant Jun 24 '10 at 21:12
    
@Gabe - A buggy plug-in should crash every app it touches, because it is a buggy plug-in. People should be made aware of the fact that it's buggy, so it can be fixed or avoided. Protecting lousy plug-ins at the possible expense of user's data is a bad policy. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Jun 24 '10 at 21:17
    
@Dan - Nothing is set in stone, it may be that they have to do this so the service or job can continue processing. –  ChaosPandion Jun 24 '10 at 21:17
1  
@Chaos, I've been in that boat before, where the perceived cost of a customer seeing a 'crash' was such that there was pressure to keep the app running, at all costs. I've become increasingly resistant to that line of thought as I accumulate more experience of the kinds of ugly consequences that can result from letting unknown failures slide. –  Dan Bryant Jun 24 '10 at 21:34

A simple but important rule:

Every defect in code should be as lethal as possible as early as possible.

In this way, the bugs are found and fixed, and the software grows ever stronger. What the others are saying is correct; never catch an exception that you don't expect and know how to deal with.

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Everyone keep saying this but it is not always so simple. What if they have no control over who subscribes to the event? What if it is imperative that processing continues? –  ChaosPandion Jun 24 '10 at 21:27
1  
@Chaos, in that case, you need to structure your events in a way that allows for isolation. For example, set up a client/server model with isolated processes. Now a client can crash and the server can happily keep processing, even if the clients are buggy. If you have simple callback events with no isolation boundaries, then there is no protection from an unruly client interfering with your processing. The process can't guarantee its imperative (to continue processing correctly) and it's irresponsible for the process to pretend that it can. –  Dan Bryant Jun 24 '10 at 21:38
    
Dan: Assuming this is all managed code, how would you expect a buggy exception handler to interfere with the main process? –  Gabe Jun 25 '10 at 4:42
    
@Gabe, I'm assuming you mean event handler. The problem is that it likely lives on a class that has access to shared context. For instance, it may be using the database or it may be sending commands to some piece of machinery. If an exception occurs, it's possible that some damage has already been done, but if you ignore the unknown exception, you simply allow the damage to compound. That said, you can minimize the possibility for damage through good use of defensive coding practices. Better yet, handle known exceptions at the service layer and they won't show up in the event handler. –  Dan Bryant Jun 25 '10 at 16:18
    
Dan: Yes, I meant an event handler. My point was that the OP seemed to have a situation where his code wasn't coupled with the event handler's code. I mean, why assume that the damage is limited to the app and only crash the app? You don't know what kinds of horrible things this event handler was tied to, so why not crash the whole OS? –  Gabe Jun 25 '10 at 16:59

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