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I'm using this fftw library.

Currently I'm trying to plot a 2D Gaussian in the form e^(-(x^2+y^2)/a^2).

Here is the code:

using namespace std;
int main(int argc, char** argv ){
    fftw_complex *in, *out, *data;
    fftw_plan p;
    int i,j;
    int w=16;
    int h=16;
    double a = 2;
    in = (fftw_complex*) fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex)*w*h);
    out = (fftw_complex*) fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex)*w*h);
    for(i=0;i<w;i++){
        for(j=0;j<h;j++){
            in[i*h+j][0] = exp(- (i*i+j*j)/(a*a));
            in[i*h+j][1] = 0;
        }
    }
    p = fftw_plan_dft_2d(w, h, in, out, FFTW_FORWARD, FFTW_ESTIMATE);
    fftw_execute(p);
    //This is something that print what's in the matrix
    print_2d(out,w,h);

    fftw_destroy_plan(p);
    fftw_free(in);
    fftw_free(out);
    return 0;
}

Turns out negative numbers shows up. I thought Fourier transform of a Gaussian is another Gaussian, which shouldn't include any negative numbers.

Also, the current origin is at in[0]

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4  
Two possible problems: (i) you're doing a discrete FT, not an FT and (ii) your Gaussian function has effectively been multiplied by a rectangular window (since it is truncated), which is equivalent to a convolution in the frequency domain by the FT of the window function. –  Paul R Jun 24 '10 at 23:01
    
(iii) Floating-point math is notoriously imprecise, at least by naive standards. -1E-30 would be a rounding error, not a true negative number. –  MSalters Jun 25 '10 at 8:50
    
I guess these are the reasons. Of course I can't check it, since I can't do continuous FT on my computer. –  Chao Xu Jun 25 '10 at 20:08
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1 Answer

You forgot to shift the center of the Gaussian to the middle (w/2, h/2)

in[i*h+j][0] = exp(-(i*i+j*j)/(a*a));

should read

in[i*h+j][0] = exp(-1.*((i-w/2)*(i-w/2)+(j-h/2)*(j-h/2))/(a*a));

Without the shift, it's only a quarter of a Gaussian, whose Fourier transform is of course not a Gaussian. The entire code is attached below.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <fftw3.h>
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    fftw_complex *in, *out;
    fftw_plan p;
    int i, j, w = 16, h = 16;
    double a = 2;
    in = (fftw_complex *) fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * w * h);
    out = (fftw_complex *) fftw_malloc(sizeof(fftw_complex) * w * h);
    for (i = 0; i < w; i++)
        for (j = 0; j < h; j++) {
            in[i*h+j][0] = exp(-1.*((i-w/2)*(i-w/2)+(j-h/2)*(j-h/2))/(a*a));
            in[i*h+j][1] = 0;
        }
    p = fftw_plan_dft_2d(w, h, in, out, FFTW_FORWARD, FFTW_ESTIMATE);
    fftw_execute(p);
    for (i = 0; i < w; i++)
      for (j = 0; j < h; j++)
        printf("%4d %4d: %+9.4f %+9.4f i\n", i, j, out[i*h+j][0], out[i*h+j][1]);
    fftw_destroy_plan(p); fftw_cleanup();
    fftw_free(in); fftw_free(out);
    return 0;
}
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