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Ok this is a little bit of a strange request. We are trying to get a formatted "age" statement to come out in a report in PeopleSoft, it provides a "TSQL" based builder which is fairly unhelpful. We cannot use stored functions and we cannot edit the entire SQL statement as one thing. All we can do is say field by field what the formula is, then the tool will join it all the elements together to produce the query.

So, given that restriction how can we get the difference between two dates to be formatted as a nicely human readable sentence eg. "14 years, 3 months and 10 days"

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

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Field by field? Example pls –  OMG Ponies Jun 25 '10 at 1:35
    
if you have an VIEW you have SELECT Field 1 = ..., Field 2 = ..., etc FROM tables WHERE All we can touch in the tool is "Field 1 =" then press save and move to Field 2 = Most ridiculously annoying way of constructing SQL I have ever struck. –  Robin Vessey Jun 25 '10 at 2:00

2 Answers 2

If you can use string concatenation, this will give you the number of years:

DATEDIFF(yy, t.startdate, t.enddate) 

This will give you the months:

DATEDIFF(mm, 
         DATEADD(yy, 
                 DATEDIFF(yy,  
                          t.startdate, 
                          t.enddate), 
                 t.startdate), 
         t.enddate)

And this will give you the days value:

DATEDIFF(dd, 
         DATEADD(mm, 
                 DATEDIFF(mm, 
                          DATEADD(yy, 
                                  DATEDIFF(yy, 
                                           t.startdate, 
                                           t.enddate), 
                                  t.startdate), 
                          t.enddate), 
                          DATEADD(yy, 
                                  DATEDIFF(yy, 
                                           t.startdate, 
                                           t.enddate), 
                                  t.startdate)), 
         t.enddate)

You can see & test using this saved query I posted on the StackExchange Data Explorer. It uses Azure, with uses TSQL...

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ok, testing this –  Robin Vessey Jun 25 '10 at 2:01
    
No, IT has taken it offline for an upgrade for the next three days ... –  Robin Vessey Jun 25 '10 at 2:20
1  
@Rob: Sorry - pardon? –  OMG Ponies Jun 25 '10 at 2:23
    
ok, I ran it in a TSQL window in stead and it gives '14 years -3 Months , -4 days' Instead of '13 Years, 8 Months, 25 days' –  Robin Vessey Jun 25 '10 at 3:53
    
@Rob: What are the dates you are testing with? –  OMG Ponies Jun 25 '10 at 14:13

You can use whatever formula you like. You simply put the return type, and the SQL function in the expression tab, then use the expression as a field.

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