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I have a file containing lines of the form,

double mass, string seq, int K, int TS, int M, [variable number of ints]
688.83       AFTDSK      1      1       0       3384 2399 1200
790.00       MDSSTK      1      3       1       342 2

I need a (preferably simple) way of parsing this file without boost. If the number of values per line had been constant then I would have used the solution here.

Each line will become an object of class Peptide:

class Peptide {
    public:
        double mass;
        string sequence;
        int numK;
        int numPTS;
        int numM;
        set<int> parents;
 }

The first three integers have specific variable names in the object while all the following integers need to be inserted into a set.


I was fortunate enough to get two really awesome responses but the run time differences made the C implementation the best answer for me.

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The best way I know of to parse an ascii text file is to read it line-by-line and use strtok. It's a C function, but it'll break your input into individual tokens for you. Then, you can use the string parsing functions atoi and strtod to parse your numeric values. For the file format you specified, I'd do something like this:

  string line;
  ifstream f(argv[1]);
  if(!f.is_open()) {
    cout << "The file you specified could not be read." << endl;
    return 1;
  }

  while(!f.eof()) {
    getline(f, line);
    if(line == "" || line[0] == '#') continue;

    char *ptr, *buf;
    buf = new char[line.size() + 1];
    strcpy(buf, line.c_str());

    Peptide pep;
    pep.mass     = strtod(strtok(buf, " "), NULL);
    pep.sequence = strtok(NULL, " ");
    pep.numK     = strtol(strtok(NULL, " "), NULL, 10);
    pep.numPTS   = strtol(strtok(NULL, " "), NULL, 10);
    pep.numM     = strtol(strtok(NULL, " "), NULL, 10);
    while(ptr = strtok(NULL, " "))
      pep.parents.insert(strtol(ptr, NULL, 10));

    cout << "mass: " << mass << endl
         << "sequence: " << sequence << endl
         << "numK: " << numK << endl
         << "numPTS: " << numPTS << endl
         << "numM: " << numM << endl
         << "parents:" << endl;

    set<int>::iterator it;
    for(it = parents.begin(); it != parents.end(); it++)
      cout << "\t- " << *it << endl;
  }
  f.close();
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2  
See this: atoi considered harmful : blog.mozilla.com/nnethercote/2009/03/13/atol-considered-harmful. –  Stephen Jun 25 '10 at 2:24
    
Wow, this looks perfect. Thank you. –  lashleigh Jun 25 '10 at 2:24
    
You got a +1 from me, but yeah, any of sscanf, istringstream, strtol would be better. –  Stephen Jun 25 '10 at 2:34
    
@Stephen Good point; I've switched to strtol, as you suggested. –  Benson Jun 25 '10 at 2:35
    
Hi guys, isn't there any need to free the memory allocated to the buf array? –  Javier Feb 15 '11 at 12:03
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If you want to use C++, use C++:

std::list<Peptide> list;
std::ifstream file("filename.ext");

while (std::getline(file, line)) {

    // Ignore empty lines.
    if (line.empty()) continue;

    // Stringstreams are your friends!
    std::istringstream row(line);

    // Read ordinary data members.
    Peptide peptide;
    row >> peptide.mass
        >> peptide.sequence
        >> peptide.numK
        >> peptide.numPTS
        >> peptide.numM;

    // Read numbers until reading fails.    
    int parent;
    while (row >> parent)
        peptide.parents.insert(parent);

    // Do whatever you like with each peptide.
    list.push_back(peptide);

}
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Out of curiosity, how does istringstream perform? –  Benson Jun 25 '10 at 2:35
    
I'm not familiar with string streams but I will certainly check them out. Thanks! –  lashleigh Jun 25 '10 at 2:37
    
+1 for a C++ centric solution! –  Jim Lewis Jun 25 '10 at 2:38
    
@Benson: an istringstream is an input stream backed by a string instead of, say, a file; performance varies with the application, but is more than adequate for these purposes. @lashleigh: No problem. They're very useful for parsing and formatting. @Jim: Thanks! –  Jon Purdy Jun 25 '10 at 2:45
3  
More data! I tried a 6.6 million line input file: my version runs in 8.8 seconds, and this version runs in about 17.8 seconds. Code here: gist.github.com/452351 and here: gist.github.com/452353 –  Benson Jun 25 '10 at 3:33
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