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I have a website with articles and sections, each sections can have a parent section, as much as they like for example:

subject 1
 -subject 2 
 --subject 3
 -subject 4
 --subject 5
 --subject 6
 ---subject 7
subject 8
subject 9

etc..

Now, i want to fetch them recursively, what is the most efficient way to do it via php and mysql?

Tnx in advanced.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If the tree isn't too large, you can simply build the tree in PHP using some clever references.

$nodeList = array();
$tree     = array();

$query = mysql_query("SELECT category_id, name, parent FROM categories ORDER BY parent");
while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($query)){
    $nodeList[$row['category_id']] = array_merge($row, array('children' => array()));
}
mysql_free_result($query);

foreach ($nodeList as $nodeId => &$node) {
    if (!$node['parent'] || !array_key_exists($node['parent'], $nodeList)) {
        $tree[] = &$node;
    } else {
        $nodeList[$node['parent']]['children'][] = &$node;
    }
}
unset($node);
unset($nodeList);

This will give you the tree structure in $tree with the children in the respective children-slot.

We've done this with fairly large trees ( >> 1000 items) and it's very stable and a lot faster than doing recursive queries in MySQL.

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This is some really nice code, still trying to get my head fully around it but its very compact for its functionality, I might be stealing it :P –  Luke Jun 25 '10 at 9:33
    
why & here? i think it will work without it too? –  Syom Jun 25 '10 at 16:42
    
You need the & because we just add references to the original $node in the $nodeList to be able to add the children not to a copy but to the original $node. –  Stefan Gehrig Jun 26 '10 at 10:58
    
@Stefan Gehrig, I have been trying to understand your code and in doing so I removed the third reference, $nodeList[$node['parent']]['children'][] = &$node; became $nodeList[$node['parent']]['children'][] = $node; and it still worked. This hasnt helped me understand it any more :) but I thought I would mention it. Luke –  Luke Jun 30 '10 at 9:04
    
@Luke: yes that's right - this & is not required, but the first two are crucial. Let's try to briefly explain what this code does: - we read the DB result set into $nodeList (indexed by the primary key) - we iterate over this list of nodes getting a reference to each node array (first &) - we check if the current node has a parent and the parent exists in the $nodeList - if not (if-branch) we add a reference (second &) to the current node to the root of our $tree - if yes (else-branch) we add the reference (third & which is not required) to the node's parent children collection –  Stefan Gehrig Jun 30 '10 at 10:00
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That depends on how you have stored your data. There is a good article on MySQL.com called Managing Hierarchical Data in MySQL that talks about this.

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1  
i just wanted to say that. this is the only way to fetch all hierarchy in one query –  Dobiatowski Jun 25 '10 at 8:16
    
that link is dead –  beerwin Jul 12 '11 at 8:29
1  
@beerwin: I changed the link to show the new location. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 21 '11 at 20:35
    
Thank you, that helped me a lot –  beerwin Sep 2 '11 at 18:47
    
Very nice article! –  Ali Feb 28 '12 at 12:07
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Well, you can fetch all the categories in an array in just the one query, as you know:

$query = "SELECT `name`,`id` from `table`";

Having that in an array, you can build the tree with some nested loops. It won't be fast, but is simple, and faster than using recursive queries. Also, you can cache the built tree and not having to rebuild it every time.

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i've wrote the tree function not with recursy too, but the script was very large, and doesn't work faster, then recursy, so why not recurcy? –  Syom Jun 25 '10 at 8:47
    
SQL queries + recursion is something you want avoid, at least in my experience. –  Jani Jun 25 '10 at 8:56
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You could have a look at this topic : how to get the hierarchical menu from mysql that was opened yesterday and is about the same thing.

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I cant guarentee I havent made any syntax mistakes but this should work with one query.

class menuSystem{ 
var $menu;
var $db; #this variable is my db class assigned from the construct, I havent written the construct in, I can if you need it
function startNav(){
    $this->db->runQuery("select * from table order by parent asc");
    $menu = array(0 => array('children' => array()));
    while ($data = $this->db->fetchArray()) {
      $menu[$data['category_id']] = $data;
      $menu[(is_null($data['parent']) ? '0' : $data['parent'] )]['children'][] = $data['category_id'];
    }
    $this->menu = $menu;
    $nav = '<ul>';
    foreach($menu[0]['children'] as $child_id) {
      $nav .= $this->makeNav($menu[$child_id]);
    }
    $nav .= '</ul>';
}

function makeNav($menu){
   $nav_one = '<li>'."\n\t".'<a href="#">'$menu['name'].'</a>';
    if(isset($menu['children']) && !empty($menu['children'])) {
      $nav_one .= "<ul>\n";
      foreach($menu['children'] as $child_id) {
        $nav_one .= $this->makeNav($this->menu[$child_id]);
      }
      $nav_one .= "</ul>\n";
    }
    $nav_one .= "</li>\n";
return $nav_one;
}

}

EDIT: sorry I use this in my code as a class and thought I had managed to take it out of a class for you but forgot I needed $this->menu

UPDATE: I think the below is out of a class now, sorry for such a long answer

$result = mysql_query("select * from table order by parent_id asc");
$menu = array(0 => array('children' => array()));
while ($data = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
  $menu[$data['category_id']] = $data;
  $menu[(is_null($data['parent_id']) ? '0' : $data['parent_id'] )]['children'][] = $data['category_id'];
}
$global_menu = $menu;
$nav = '<ul>';
foreach($menu[0]['children'] as $child_id) {
  $nav .= makeNav($menu[$child_id]);
}
$nav .= '</ul>';

function makeNav($menu) {
  global $global_menu;
  $nav_one = '<li>'."\n\t".'<a href="#">' . $menu['name'].'</a>';
  if(isset($menu['children']) && !empty($menu['children'])) {
    $nav_one .= "<ul>\n";
    foreach($menu['children'] as $child_id) {
      $nav_one .= makeNav($global_menu[$child_id]);
    }
    $nav_one .= "</ul>\n";
  }
  $nav_one .= "</li>\n";
  return $nav_one;
}

Hope it helps

Luke

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Mine uses recursion with one query as well...

A recursive method to storing hierarchical data without multiple calls to the database

I wanted to use recursion also due to its simplicity but like you I wanted to remove the overhead of a recursive query. My logic says in this way you are just moving the load from the database to memory depending on the size of your database result but I have not done any real scalability testing on this so I don't know how much of an impact it has vs non recursive methods.

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the first part of the article relates only to 4 levels, the last part is not the way I want to do it.

my structure is something like that:

+-------------+----------------------+--------+
| category_id | name                 | parent |
+-------------+----------------------+--------+
|           1 | test                 |   NULL |
|           2 | subject1             |   1    |
|           3 | subject2             |   1    |
|           4 | subject3             |   2    |
|           5 | subject4             |   4    |
+-------------+----------------------+--------+

I dont want to complicate things, I want to do it in the most simple way, but to fetch the data in the most efficient way.

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I have implemented a very similar structure to this and found it to work well. –  Jon Winstanley Jun 25 '10 at 8:45
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if assume, that your table has id, id_parrent and name fields

function tree($id)
{
    $query = "SELECT `name`,`id` from `table` WHERE `id_parrent` = '$id'";
    $result = mysql_query($query);
     if(mysql_num_rows($result) != 0)
       {
            echo "<ul>";
            while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
            {             
                 echo "<li>",$row[name],"</li>";
                 tree($row[id]);
            }
            echo "</ul>";
       }
}

by so you'll get the whole tree

category1
       category1_1
       category1_2
              category1_2_1
              category1_2_2
       category1_3
...........................
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thats the easy part, i want to do it with one query.. –  WEBProject Jun 25 '10 at 8:13
    
i have only one query in my function :P –  Syom Jun 25 '10 at 8:15
    
i'm joking. sorry, but i can't imagine is it possible to do with single query. –  Syom Jun 25 '10 at 8:16
    
this one is the slowest solution. –  Dobiatowski Jun 25 '10 at 8:17
    
@Dobiatowski don't say slowest. it will be more slower if you deside to print them one by one, by hand :D –  Syom Jun 25 '10 at 8:21
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From your example to each category save its full path in another field:
1 - 1
2 - 1.2
3 - 1.2.3
4 - 1.4
5 - 1.4.5
6 - 1.4.6
7 - 1.4.6.7
8 - 8
9 - 9

and then just query with ORDER BY on that field

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I have a good solution for this problem.

It does not use recursion. And it requires a single query to the database.

I have just posted the code in my answer to a similar question here:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2871861#3368622

Thanks.

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