Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's say I have:

  switch( choice ) {
  case A:   
     stmt;
     do_stmt_related2A;
  break;

  case B:
     stmt;
     do_stmt_related2B;
  break;

  case C: something_different();
   ...
  }

How could I avoid duplicating stmt code?

But is there any workaround? gcc extension label as value looks quite good for such situation.

   switch( choice ) {
     do {
     case A:  ptr = &&A_label;
     break;
     case B:  ptr = &&B_label;
     } while(0);
              stmt;
              goto *ptr;
     case C: ...

Is there any trick that can do the same in ANSI-C? Edit: Of course I have thought of function/macro/inline. But anything else? It's not about performance either. Just for educational purpose. ;)

share|improve this question
    
Can't imagine that the sniplet you posted for a `gcc' variant would compile. Please post only valid code that your compiler has ack'd. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 25 '10 at 9:16
    
@Jens Gustedt, it's gcc extension. –  Nyan Jun 25 '10 at 14:29
2  
@Nyan: I didn't mean the address of pointer stuff, I knew about that extension. I meant the do while thingy. To my complete surprise I have to learn that this is a valid C construct, know as Duff's device. I am baffled. Never finished learning. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 25 '10 at 15:04
7  
"Simple" and "important" should not be spoken in the same breath as "Duff's Device". It's an ugly, unintuitive construct with questionable benefit, even for the purpose of optimization. It's a neat trick and an interesting historical note, but its use in new code should be strongly discouraged. –  Steve S Jun 29 '10 at 20:19
10  
Actively discouraged. As in "people using it should be beaten to death with a stick of wet celery (to make the pain last longer)". There is no place in modern code for Duff's device and it ilk. Check wikipedia for some quick snippets: "in some cases two loops may actually be faster", "When numerous instances of Duff's device were removed from the XFree86 Server in version 4.0, there was an improvement in performance", "may also interfere with pipelining and branch prediction on some architectures". –  paxdiablo Jun 30 '10 at 6:34
show 1 more comment

15 Answers

Why don't you just refactor stmt (I'm assuming this is a big chunk of instructions rather than a single line) into its own function do_stmt() and call it? Something like:

switch( choice ) {
    case A:
        do_stmt();
        do_stmt_related2A;
        break;
    case B:
        do_stmt();
        do_stmt_related2B;
        break;
    case C: something_different();
        ...
}

That gcc trick is truly hideous. I would rather have readable code over such monstrosities any day.

You should always assume that the programmer that inherits your code is a homicidal maniac who knows where you live :-)

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 falling in love with monstrous syntax like that is a surefire way to self-destruction. –  stinky472 Jun 25 '10 at 9:08
add comment

How could I avoid duplicating stmt code?

By putting it into a function and call that.

And, no, you do not know whether this will slow down your application until you profiled it and found it to be the bottleneck. (And in case it really is, use a macro or, if that's C99, make the function inline.)

share|improve this answer
3  
When you down-vote something for the first few times, a hint appears, asking you to explain in a comment why you down-voted. After a while, that hint doesn't appear anymore. However, you still should explain why you down-voted an answer. So why was this down-voted? –  sbi Jun 25 '10 at 15:29
1  
Reason? point your mouse on down-vote button. ;) –  Nyan Jun 25 '10 at 16:00
7  
Looks useful advice to me.. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 29 '10 at 20:07
3  
This looks really useful to me. Anyone who thinks otherwise is either an idiot or troll. +1 for good answer, and if I could give you a sympathy +2 I would. –  Platinum Azure Jul 1 '10 at 15:11
2  
A simple +1 vs -1 is never as educational as "-1 because ...". Encouraging the desired behaviour can be much faster with comments. –  sarnold Jul 3 '10 at 1:41
show 11 more comments

Aside from the common sentiment to refactor the common code into a sub-function, the simplest way to refactor your code using standard C functionality is probably:

if (choice == A || choice == B) {
    stmt;
}

switch( choice ) {
  case A:   
    do_stmt_related2A;
    break;

  case B:
    do_stmt_related2B;
    break;

  case C:
    something_different();
    ...
}

It cleanly expresses what you want to do, and it avoids the switch-inside-a-switch that prevents some compilers from optimizing the code effectively.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There will be some code either way - you can have duplicated code, or code to avoid duplication. So I'm curious as to how complex the stmt; code really is.

The simple, clean solution is to move the shared part (stmt) into a seperate function.

void do_shared_stmt(void) {
 stmt;
}
/* .... */
swtich(choise) {
case A:
  do_shared_stmt();
  do_stmt_related2A();
  break;
case B:
  do_shared_stmt();
  do_stmt_related2B();
  break;
case C:
  something_different();
/* ... */
}

Another solution (that might be acceptable, depending on your situation) is to nest branching statements:

swtich(choise) {
case A:
case B:
  stmt;
  if(choise == A) {
    do_stmt_related2A();
  } else {̈́
    do_stmt_related2B();
  }
  break;
case C:
  something_different();
/* ... */
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I'll probably do something like that :

void do_stmt(int choice)
{
    stmt;
    switch(choice)
    {
         case A:
             do_stmt_related2A;
             break;
         case B:
             do_stmt_related2B;
             break;
    }  
}
/* ... */
switch(choice)
{
    case A:
    case B:
        do_stmt(choice);
        break;
    case C:
         something_different();
...
share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd go for something like what I append here. Sure, you probably had the idea yourself to have a nested switch statement, nothing new. What this does in addition is that it evaluates choice only once.

It also avoids the gcc construct of addresses of labels, so there is no indirection, here. A decent compiler should be able to optimize such a thing quite well.

Observe also, that my_choice is an intmax_t so this should be compatible with any type choice could have.

(Putting in the for is just for the fun, and would only work with C99, obviously. You could replace it with an extra {} around the stuff and just a declaration of my_choice for C89.)

typedef enum { one = 1, two, three } number;

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

  number choice = (number)argc;

  for (intmax_t _0 = 0, my_choice = choice; !_0; ++_0)
    switch(my_choice) {
    case one:;
    case two:;
      {
        printf("Do whatever you want here\n");
        switch (my_choice) {
        case one:
          printf("test 1\n");
          break;
        case two:
          printf("test 2\n");
          break;
        }
        printf("end special\n");
      }
      break;
    default:;
      printf("test %d, default\n", choice);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Using goto pointers will likely result in slower code because it shuts off some of gcc's other optimizations (or would the last time I read up on it). Gcc essentially decides that it could be way too complicated to try to keep up with what might be going on and assumes that many more branch instructions can target every goto label that has been && than is really the case. If you insist on trying to use this method I suggest that you attempt to use an integer and another switch/case rather than the goto. Gcc will like be able to make sense of that.

Aside from that, for many statements this may not be worth the work or it may actually work better the way it is. It really does depend a lot on what stmt actually is.

Refactoring stmt into a static function will likely yield good results if stmt is indeed expensive or big code.

Another thing you might try if you can would be to hoist stmt out of the switch/case and just execute always execute it. Sometimes this is the cheapest way to go, but that really does depend on what stmt actually does.

Another thing you might do is refactor all of stmt , do_stmt_related2A , and do_stmt_related2A all into file static functions, like this:

// args in this is just a psudocode place holder for whatever arguments are needed, and 
// not valide C code.
static void stmt_f(void (*continuation)(arg_list), args) {
   stmt; // This corresponds almost exactly to stmt in your code
   continuation(args);
}
static void do_stmt_related2A_f(args) {
    do_stmt_related2A;
}
static void do_stmp_related2B_f(args) {
    do_stmt_related2B;
}

...
    switch (condition) {
       case A:
          stmt_f(do_stmt_related2A_f, args);
          break;
       case B:
    ...

The call to the continuation function at the end of stmt_f is a tail call and will most likely become a jump rather than a real call. Because all of these are static it is possible that the compiler would see the entire set of values which could be continuation functions and optimize some more, but I don't know that.

Unless stmt is very big it is very likely that this is a micro-optimization that just isn't worth it. If you really want to know then you should compile to assembly and try to see what the compiler really does with your original code. It may very well do a better job than you think on it.

Oh, one last thing you might try is if you control what actual values A, B, C.. can take then you could make sure that the ones with similar prefixes have adjacent values. If A and B really are next to each other and if the compiler decides that it needs to break up the switch/case into a few different jump tables then it will likely put A and B in the same jump table and also see that they have the same prefix and hoist that code out for you. This is more likely if C, which does not share that prefix, is not adjacent to A or B, but then your overall code could be worse.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You simply need two control structures. One for dictating execution of the first order instructions, a second for the second order instructions.

switch (state) {
    case A:
    case B:
        stmt;

        switch (state) {
            case A:
                do_stmt_related2A;
                break;
            case B:
                do_stmt_related2B;
                break;
        }

        break;

    case C:
        something_different();
        ...
}

It's also worth noting that switch is less suitable for the second order control structure, you likely want to use a more traditional conditional branch. Lastly, the real answer to your question regarding goto-label-pointer is that this is what subroutine linkage is for. If your instructions are more complex than a single expression, then you can and should use a function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's one alternate to function calls or secondary switch statements:

isA=false;
switch( choice ) { 
  case A:    
    isA=true;
  //nobreak
  case B: 
    stmt; 
    isA ? do_stmt_related2A : do_stmt_related2B;
  break; 
  case C: 
    something_different(); 
  break;
} 

However, I can't say I really recommend it as a coding style.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're using gcc, one option is nested functions. These are functions that have access to all the variables of the parent function.

For example:

void foo(int bar) {

    int x = 0;
    void stmt(void) { //nested function!!
        x++;
        if (x == 8) {
            x = 0;
        }
    }

    switch( bar ) {
    case A:   
        stmt();
        do_stmt_related2A;
    break;

    case B:
        stmt();
        do_stmt_related2B;
    break;

    case C:
        something_different();
        ...
    break;
    }
}

Since this is a gcc extension, it should obviously not be used for code intended to be portable. But it can be fun to play with :) and in certain circumstances makes the code much more readable.

If you have an executable stack you can even create a pointer to a nested function. It's a lot like a lambda function, except horrible - or horribly fun, depending on your perspective. (Like all pointers to "local" objects, the pointer becomes invalid when the parent function exits! Beware!)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Go back to the original meanings of the different case-values. What do cases A, B and C represent? If A and B should execute partially the same code, they should have some similarities. Find them and express them in another way.

The following example makes this clearer. Suppose that A, B and C are 3 different kinds of animals, and the duplicated code for A and B is actually typical for animals that can fly. You could then write your code like this:

if (can_fly(choice))
   {
   stmt;
   }

switch( choice )
  {
  case A:   
     do_stmt_related2A;
     break;
  case B:
     do_stmt_related2B;
     break;
  case C:
     something_different();
     break;
  }

That way, if a 3rd choice D is added later to your application, the chances of forgetting the "stmt" duplicated code is slightly smaller.

If you really want to prevent a function call (to can_fly), and A, B and C are numerical constants, you could make use of bitmasks. In this example, we use one bit to indicate the animal can fly:

if (choice & BIT_CAN_FLY)
   {
   stmt;
   }

switch( choice )
  {
  case A:   
     do_stmt_related2A;
     break;
  case B:
     do_stmt_related2B;
     break;
  case C:
     something_different();
     break;
  }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can easily just put your stmt code into a function and call that function from your case or wherever, you can call a function how ever many times you want.

share|improve this answer
add comment

i see only two possible arrangements of ur logic.

L1:
 val
 |
 |-------------------
 |        |         |
 A        B         C
 |        |         |
 stmt     stmt      crap
 |        |
 Afunk    Bfunk

L2:
 val
 |
 |-------------------
 stmt               |
 |---------         |
 |        |         |
 A        B         C
 |        |         |
 Afunk    Bfunk     crap

In L1, use inline function for stmt or use L2 if branching twice is ok. If you are talkin about src code duplication(as opposed to duplication in the binary), just inline func will solve ur problem.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Others have already given this answer, but I wanted to state it in formal terms.

If performance isn't your concern, then you've correctly identified one of the typical "code smells" which is duplicate code.

One of the most basic refactorings is called Extract Method. Learn it, live it, love it. The process of identifying duplicate code and eliminating it should be part of your minute-by-minute workflow.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a possibility that you should probably ignore (but that's kind of interesting):

// function pointer to B function
void (*func)(void) = do_stmt_related2B;
switch(choice) {
case A:
    func = do_stmt_related2A; // change function pointer to A function
case B:
    stmt;
    func(); // call function pointer
    break;

case C:
    something_different();
    ...
}

May or may not be more efficient/smaller/readable/advisable/fun than the other solutions. Just an interesting way to tackle this problem that no one else has mentioned.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.