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I was learning about how to use textures with GLSL (in LWJGL) to create a simple fragment shader that blurs a texture. The first attempt (for testing purposes) was a very simple shader which just takes the original color values:

uniform sampler2D rectTexture;

void main(){
  vec4 color = texture2D(rectTexture, gl_FragCoord.st);
  gl_FragColor = color;
}

The shader compiles fine. After compilation I link and start to use it, up to this everything's working and no errors are reported. Then I try to set the uniform variable for the texture:

uniformTextureAddr = ARBShaderObjects.glGetUniformLocationARB(programObject, "rectTexture");
ARBMultitexture.glActiveTextureARB(ARBMultitexture.GL_TEXTURE0_ARB);
GL11.glBindTexture(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D, texture);
ARBShaderObjects.glUniform1iARB(uniformTextureAddr, 0);

Then I just draw a quad with normal texcoords (0.0f-1.0f on both dimensions) but the texture doesn't show up. The texture itself is not the problem; I draw a second quad next to the first one without my fragment shader an it shows up as you would expect. The basic approach is taken from NeHe: GLSL - An Introduction. uniformTextureAddr is not -1 and if I use an even simpler shader, which just turns every pixel red, I get a red quad. As expected. So the bug has to be in the whole sampler2D business. Trivial mistakes, such as the quad simply being out of frame, are also ruled out by this.

And yes, after drawing without the shader I call glUseProgramObject(programObj) with my shader again.

By the way, this is running on Windows XP SP3 with a ATI Radeon Catalyst 10.6 driver and LWJGL version 2.4.2.

UPDATE: I think something might be wrong with the program itself. When I add another variable to the shader:

uniform sampler2D secondTexture;
uniform sampler2D rectTexture;

void main(){
  vec4 color = texture2D(rectTexture, gl_FragCoord.st);
  gl_FragColor = color;
}

and call glGetUniformLocationARB(programObject, "secondTexture"); it just returns -1, even though it should be there. Log info still only says:

Info log: Fragment shader was successfully compiled to run on hardware.

UPDATE 2:

The actual texture is copied from the backbuffer. A simple white line is drawn in a smaller viewport and then copied to a texture:

GL11.glViewport(0, 0, 256, 256);
GL11.glDisable(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D);
GL11.glColor3f(1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f);
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_LINES);
GL11.glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(256.0f, 256.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glEnd();
GL11.glEnable(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D);
GL11.glCopyTexImage2D(GL11.GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, GL11.GL_LUMINANCE, 0, 0, 256, 256, 0);
GL11.glClear(GL11.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT | GL11.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT);
GL11.glViewport(0, 0, WINDOW_WIDTH, WINDOW_HEIGHT);

But like I said, I don't think the texture is the actual problem, since it shows up fine on the second quad without my custom shader. Also, don't worry about binding; this is the only texture in the program and is only bound once at the very beginning.

Here is my drawing code:

ARBShaderObjects.glUseProgramObjectARB(programObject);
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 1.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 1.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(256.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(256.0f, 256.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(0.0f, 256.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glEnd();
ARBShaderObjects.glUseProgramObjectARB(0);
GL11.glBegin(GL11.GL_QUADS);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 1.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(256.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 1.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(512.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(1.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(512.0f, 256.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glTexCoord2f(0.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glVertex3f(256.0f, 256.0f, 0.0f);
GL11.glEnd();
share|improve this question
    
About your update, is not a problem, GLSL compilers usually optimize out variables that are not used, and this is the case. –  Matias Valdenegro Jun 25 '10 at 16:37
    
Can you post texture loading code and draw code? –  Matias Valdenegro Jun 25 '10 at 16:37
    
I've added the info you requested. It was too long for the comment field so I just edited my question. –  Marc Müller Jun 25 '10 at 18:04
    
About your first update, that's normal, most GLSL compilers optimize out unused variables, you're not using secondTexture, so it's removed. –  Matias Valdenegro Jul 27 '10 at 15:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are providing texture coordinates but not using them in shader. Instead, you are using gl_FragCoord, which gives you window coordinates:

texture2D(rectTexture, gl_FragCoord.st)

You should use gl_MultiTexCoord0.xy instead.

share|improve this answer

Since you are using GL_TEXTURE_2D to store the rectTexture, the sampler will expect normalized texture coordinates (i.e. [0.0, 1.0]).

So your shader should be modified to:

uniform vec2 invTextureSize; // contains [1.0 / w, 1.0 / h];
uniform sampler2D rectTexture;

void main() {
  vec4 color = texture2D( rectTexture, gl_FragCoord.st * invTextureSize.xy );
  gl_FragColor = color;
}

In addition, you will need to setup the GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S and GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T properly for that texture object.

If not, most opengl driver will provide a rgba = [0, 0, 0, 0] color to the shader.

Please see the reference of glTexParameter

The following configuration works for most GL_TEXTURE_2D objects

glTexParameter( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR );
glTexParameter( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR );
glTexParameter( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE );
glTexParameter( GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE );

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Are you using a vertex shader also? Some cards require that you provide both a vertex and a fragment shader.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I am not using a vertex shader. But I don't think that's the problem since I'm also not using a vertex shader with the other shader that just turns pixels red, which works. –  Marc Müller Jun 25 '10 at 10:53
    
I believe you should at least try with a simple vertex shader, the problem might be that texture coordinates aren't being passed correctly from fixed function (a driver bug), and the only way to check this is use a vertex shader. Also, your vertex shader should pass texture coordinates along the vertex position. –  Matias Valdenegro Jul 27 '10 at 15:59

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