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Hi is this possible that a node in the complete binary tree has just one child? thanks

EDIT : this can be a complete binary tree?

        23
       /  \
      12  15
     /  \   
    9   11 
   / \    \
  10  5    13  
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Is this homework? Please mark it [homework]. –  S.Lott Jun 25 '10 at 11:17
    
NO ,it is not a home work –  user355002 Jun 25 '10 at 11:20
    
No, this is not a complete binary tree. The nodes must be aligned from left to right. If the 13 node was a left child instead of a right, then your binary tree will be complete. –  Petar Minchev Jun 25 '10 at 11:30
    
aha also it does not matter that for one node a left child is greater than right child? –  user355002 Jun 25 '10 at 11:32
1  
@matin1234 You are right. I am absent-minded right now and just didn't see that level#3 is not full. I am sorry for that. –  Petar Minchev Jun 25 '10 at 11:37

4 Answers 4

OK, first to make the difference between a perfect and a complete binary tree. In a perfect binary tree every node has two children(if not a leaf) or no children(if a leaf). So a perfect binary tree of level N has totally 2^(N + 1) - 1 nodes. But if we talk about complete binary tree - this means every level, except the last is full, and the last level may not be full. Also in a complete binary tree, the last level nodes must be filled from left to right.

So if you talk about perfect binary tree, it is not possible. But if you mean the complete binary tree, it is possible to have only one child.

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I would say it is possible:

     *
    / \
   /   \
  *     x
 / \   / 
*   * *

this is a

binary tree in which every level, except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible

And node x has just one child.

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Depends on the definition, and I’d like to have a source for yours, but yes, this is a sensible definition which allows this. +1 –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 25 '10 at 10:51
    
I took the definition from vlood's answer. –  phimuemue Jun 25 '10 at 10:51

Citing Wikipedia:

A complete binary tree is a binary tree in which every level, except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible.

Which means no.

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2  
“except …” followed by “no” is a non sequitur, i.e. a logical fallacy. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 25 '10 at 10:52
    
Shouldn't that be "Which means Yes"? –  Tom Hubbard Jun 25 '10 at 10:57
    
Which means 'no' => the provided example is not a complete binary tree. –  vlood Jun 29 '10 at 14:08

From the other answers:

A complete binary tree is a binary tree in which every level, except possibly the last, is completely filled, and all nodes are as far left as possible.

        23
       /  \
      12  15
     /  \   
    9   11     <- not the last level, but not completely filled!
   / \    \
  10  5    13  <- last level: not completely filled, but that's okay

So this example tree is not complete, according to this definition.

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