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I'm trying to make a filter on script to make this happen:

Before:

123.125.66.126 - - [05/Apr/2010:09:18:12 -0300] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 302 290
66.249.71.167 - - [05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/1.1" 404 290
66.249.71.167 - - [05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] "GET /~leonardo_campos/IFBA/Web_Design_Aula_17.pdf HTTP/1.1" 404 324

After:

[05/Apr/2010:09:18:12 -0300] / 302 290
[05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] /robots.txt 404 290
[05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] /~leonardo_campos/IFBA/Web_Design_Aula_17.pdf 404 324

If someone could help it would be great...

Thanks in advance !

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Supporting all HTTP methods:

sed 's#.*\(\[[^]]*\]\).*"[A-Z]* \(.*\) HTTP/[0-9.]*" \(.*\)#\1 \2 \3#'
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Chers mate... It works fine ! – Alucard Jun 25 '10 at 12:27

It seems a perfect work for "sed".

You can easily construct a pair of "s" replacement patterns to remove the unwanted pieces of lines.

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sed is your friend here, with regexps.

sed 's/^\(\[.*\]\) "GET \(.*\) .*" \(.*\)$/\1 \2 \3/'
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if your file structure is always like that, you can just use fields. no need complex regex

$ awk '{print $4,$5,$7,$9,$10}' file
[05/Apr/2010:09:18:12 -0300] / 302 290
[05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] /robots.txt 404 290
[05/Apr/2010:09:18:13 -0300] /~leonardo_campos/IFBA/Web_Design_Aula_17.pdf 404 324
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