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I've seem many Android answers that suggest calling the garbage collector in some situations.

Is it a good practice to request the garbage collector in Android before doing a memory-hungry operation? If not, should I only call it if I get an OutOfMemory error?

Are there other things I should use before resorting to the garbage collector?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Yes, do call System.gc().

I tried to create Bitmaps, but was always getting "VM out of memory error". But, when I called System.gc() first, it was OK.

When creating bitmaps, Android often fails with out of memory errors, and does not try to garbage collect first. Hence, call System.gc(), and you have enough memory to create Bitmaps.

If creating Objects, I think System.gc will be called automatically if needed, but not for creating bitmaps. It just fails.

So I recommend manually calling System.gc() before creating bitmaps.

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19  
This is because pre-honeycomb, bitmap data is not stored in the VM and so it won't trigger the GC. It shouldn't be a problem in Honeycomb and later. –  Timmmm Nov 29 '12 at 18:07

Generally speaking, in the presence of a garbage collector, it is never good practice to manually call the GC. A GC is organized around heuristic algorithms which work best when left to their own devices. Calling the GC manually often decreases performance.

Occasionally, in some relatively rare situations, one may find that a particular GC gets it wrong, and a manual call to the GC may then improves things, performance-wise. This is because it is not really possible to implement a "perfect" GC which will manage memory optimally in all cases. Such situations are hard to predict and depend on many subtle implementation details. The "good practice" is to let the GC run by itself; a manual call to the GC is the exception, which should be envisioned only after an actual performance issue has been duly witnessed.

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4  
+1 for a good platform-independent answer. Waiting to see if someone comes up with an Android-specific answer before choosing. –  hpique Jun 25 '10 at 15:53
5  
I agree with what you wrote if you allow "performance" to mean something more general than CPU efficiency. On an Android device, the user's perception of performance is paramount. The developer may be prefer to run the GC while the user is pressing buttons for example, so the user will not be aware of the GC. –  GregS Jun 26 '10 at 15:22
3  
It is often important in games that the GC does not run while the game is running (this requires that all objects are pre-created and recycled or similar), but when the game is paused it is a good time to GC. –  Pat Apr 28 '12 at 21:15
3  
Pre-honeycomb, bitmap data is not stored in VM memory. The system will not detect when you have used too much non-VM memory due to bitmaps and run the GC (which would run the Bitmap.finalize() methods which free the non-VM memory). Therefore in this case, you should go over the GC's head and run Bitmap.recycle() or System.gc() where appropriate. But only pre-honeycomb. –  Timmmm Nov 29 '12 at 18:10

If you get an OutOfMemoryError then it's usually too late to call the garbage collector...

Here is quote from Android Developer:

Most of the time, garbage collection occurs because of tons of small, short-lived objects and some garbage collectors, like generational garbage collectors, can optimize the collection of these objects so that the application does not get interrupted too often. The Android garbage collector is unfortunately not able to perform such optimizations and the creation of short-lived objects in performance critical code paths is thus very costly for your application.

So to my understanding, there is no urgent need to call the gc. It's better to spend more effort in avoiding the unnecessary creation of objects (like creation of objects inside loops)

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3  
Can't the quote be interpreted the other way? Maybe the GC needs to be called manually in order to collect those objects before they consume too much memory. –  hpique Jun 25 '10 at 13:47
    
@hgpc: I don't see how the quote can be interpreted in the way you suggest. I'm guessing the documentation is a confession, admitting that their GC is simple; when memory runs low, a full GC is executed. –  GregS Jun 26 '10 at 15:17
    
Making full use of complex objects, and frameworks using complex objects, tends to better use of development time than premature optimisation. Worrying about optimisation is an easier trap to fall into for Android than for Enterprise Java as we subconsciously keep thinking about performance while coding an mobile app. Especially as the framework developers, who have to think about performance, leak that viewpoint into their official documentation when they are not careful. –  LateralFractal Mar 14 at 9:36

Out of memory in android application is very common if we not handle the bitmap properly, The solution for the problem would be

            System.gc();
            if(imageBitmap != null) {
                 imageBitmap.recycle();
                 imageBitmap = null;
            }
            BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
            options.inSampleSize = 3;
            imageBitmap = BitmapFactory.decodeFile(URI, options);
            Bitmap  scaledBitmap = Bitmap.createScaledBitmap(imageBitmap, 200, 200, true);
            imageView.setImageBitmap(scaledBitmap);

In the above code Have just tried to recycle the bitmap which will allow you to free up the used memory space ,so out of memory may not happen.I have tried it worked for me.

If still facing the problem you can also add these line as well

      BitmapFactory.Options options = new BitmapFactory.Options();
      options.inTempStorage = new byte[16*1024];
      options.inPurgeable = true;

for more information take a look at this link

http://voices.yahoo.com/android-virtual-machine-vm-out-memory-error-7342266.html

  • Happy programming ;)
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Shouldn't System.gc () be called after you've recycled the bitmap? –  Danyal Aytekin May 20 at 15:02

My app manage a lot of images and it died with a OutOfMemoryError. This helped me. In the Manifest.xml Add

<application
....
   android:largeHeap="true"> 
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Google don't like this –  Pedro Paulo Amorim Aug 11 at 9:09

There is no need to call the garbage collector after an OutOfMemoryError.

It's Javadoc clearly states:

Thrown when the Java Virtual Machine cannot allocate an object because it is out of memory, and no more memory could be made available by the garbage collector.

So, the garbage collector already tried to free up memory before generating the error but was unsuccessful.

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6  
The Android Javadoc does not state that, and most likely its implementation is different. d.android.com/reference/java/lang/OutOfMemoryError.html –  hpique Jun 25 '10 at 11:58
    
You are correct that this does not apply on Android. But then again you can't handle OOE at runtime ether so you can't do much about it even if this was/wasn't true. –  PSIXO Jul 18 at 12:09

Generally speaking you should not call GC explicitly with System.gc(). There is even that IO lecture (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CruQY55HOk) when they explain what the GC pauses log mean and in which they also state never call System.gc() becouse Dalvik knows better then you (developer) when it should do it.

On the other hand as mentioned in above answers already GC process in Android (like everything else) is sometimes buggy. This means Dalvik GC algorithms are not on par with Hotspot or JRockit JVMs and might get things wrong on some occasions. One of those occasions is when allocating bitmap objects. This is a tricky one because it uses Heap and Non Heap memory and because one loose instance of bitmap object on memory constrained device is enough to give you an OutOfMemory exception. So calling it after you don't need this bitmap any-more is generally suggested by many developers and is even considered good practice by some people.

Better practise thou is also using .recycle() on a bitmap as that is what this method is made for, as it marks native memory of the bitmap as safe to delete. Keep in mind that this is very version dependent, meaning it will generally be required on older Android versions (Pre 3.0 I think) but will not be required on later ones. Also it won't hurt much using it on newer versions ether (just don't do this in a loop or something like that). New ART runtime changed a lot here because they introduced special Heap "partition" for big objects but I think it will not hurt much to do this with ART ether.

Also one very important note about System.gc(). This method is not a command that Dalvik (or JVMs) are obligated to respond to. Consider it more like saying to Virtual machine "Could you please do garbage collection if it's not a hassle".

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