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We have a v.large Dictionary<long,uint> (several million entries) as part of a high performance C# application. When the application closes we serialise the dictionary to disk using BinaryFormatter and MemoryStream.ToArray(). The serialisation returns in about 30 seconds and produces a file about 200MB in size. When we then try to deserialise the dictionary using the following code:

BinaryFormatter bin = new BinaryFormatter();
Stream stream = File.Open("filePathName", FileMode.Open);
Dictionary<long, uint> allPreviousResults =
    (Dictionary<long, uint>)bin.Deserialize(stream);
stream.Close();

It takes about 15 minutes to return. We have tried alternatives and the slow part is definitely bin.Derserialize(stream), i.e. the bytes are read from the hard drive (high performance SSD) in under 1 second.

Can someone please point out what we are doing wrong as we want the load time on the same order as the save time.

Regards, Marc

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What's the type of dictionary? I.E. Is it like: Dictionary<int, string>? –  CodingGorilla Jun 25 '10 at 12:39
    
Just realised that I did actually add that to original post but it was inside triangular brackets so did'nt show up. The dictionary is (long,uint). –  MarcF Jun 25 '10 at 12:42
    
Hmm. Interesting. I could have sworn there would have been strings involved - lots of string allocations on the heap. –  Wim Hollebrandse Jun 25 '10 at 12:44
2  
super crazy idea here, but y not sql? –  Will Jun 25 '10 at 12:46
1  
It's the performance limit in our app - insert time and read from mssql is about 5ms, from the dictionary it's under half that giving us a good factor of two improvement. –  MarcF Jun 25 '10 at 12:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You may checkout protobuf-net or simply serialize it yourself which will probably be the fastest you can get.

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var dico = new Dictionary<long, uint>();
        for (long i = 0; i < 7500000; i++)
        {
            dico.Add(i, (uint)i);
        }

        using (var stream = File.OpenWrite("data.dat"))
        using (var writer = new BinaryWriter(stream))
        {
            foreach (var key in dico.Keys)
            {
                writer.Write(key);
                writer.Write(dico[key]);
            }
        }

        dico.Clear();
        using (var stream = File.OpenRead("data.dat"))
        using (var reader = new BinaryReader(stream))
        {
            while (stream.Position < stream.Length)
            {
                var key = reader.ReadInt64();
                var value = reader.ReadUInt32();
                dico.Add(key, value);
            }
        }
    }
}

size of resulting file => 90M bytes (85.8MB).

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Just ran this code using a dictionary with 20M key-value pairs, producing a file 234MB in size. Performance on an i7(4GHz) - 8GB DDR3 Ram - Vertex 2 SSD Hard drive: Dictionary build and write to file time - 2.17secs Dictionary read from file and rebuild time - 15.39secs If we can maintain that sort of performance it should work very well. –  MarcF Jun 25 '10 at 14:16
    
+1: wonderful solution :) –  Juliet Jun 25 '10 at 15:13
    
Just finished implementing this solution in our actual app and the results were similar to the performance times posted by me previously (i.e. Excellent). I was a little worried having non consecutive keys might cause a problem but it was unjustified (does not seem to make a difference). Again many thanks!! –  MarcF Jun 25 '10 at 16:10

Just to show similar serialization (to the accepted answer) via protobuf-net:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using ProtoBuf;
using System.IO;

[ProtoContract]
class Test
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public Dictionary<long, uint> Data {get;set;}
}

class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Serializer.PrepareSerializer<Test>();
        var dico = new Dictionary<long, uint>();
        for (long i = 0; i < 7500000; i++)
        {
            dico.Add(i, (uint)i);
        }
        var data = new Test { Data = dico };
        using (var stream = File.OpenWrite("data.dat"))
        {
            Serializer.Serialize(stream, data);
        }
        dico.Clear();
        using (var stream = File.OpenRead("data.dat"))
        {
            Serializer.Merge<Test>(stream, data);
        }
    }
}

Size: 83meg - but most importantly, you haven't had to do it all by hand, introducing bugs. Fast too (will be even faster in "v2").

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You may want to use a profiler to see if, behind the scenes, the deserializer is performing a bunch of on-the-fly reflection.

For now, if you don't want to use a database, try storing your objects as a flatfile in a custom format. For example, the first line the file gives the total number of entries in the dictionary, allowing you to instantiate a dictionary with a predetermined size. Have the remaining lines as a series of fixed-width key-value pairs representing all of the entries in your dictionary.

With your new file format, use a StreamReader to read in your file line-by-line or in fixed blocks, see if this allows you read in your dictionary any faster.

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Good point on sizing the dictionary before adding the entries. When investigating this approach, I would suggest using a binaryreader\writer as reading millions of strings, creating millions of strings and then parsing millions of longs and ulongs out of those strings will have performance issues of their own. –  Tim Lloyd Jun 25 '10 at 13:10
    
See @Darin's example. –  Tim Lloyd Jun 25 '10 at 13:18

There are several fast Key-Value NoSQL solutions out there why not try them? As a example ESENT, somebody posted it here at SO. managedesent

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