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Here's what I'm trying to accomplish:

I've got two tables, call them first and second. They each have an ID column. They might have other columns but those aren't important. I have a third table, call it third. It contains two columns, ID and OTHERID. OTHERID references entries that may or may not exist in tables first and second.

I want to query third and look for rows who don't have an OTHERID column value that is found in either tables first or second. The goal is to delete those rows from table third.

Example:

first table:

ID
1
2
3

second table:

ID
6
7
8

third table

ID  | OTHERID
21        1
22        2
23        3
24        4
25        5
26        6
27        7
28        8

In this case, I'd want to retrieve the IDs from third who don't have a matching ID in either table first or table second. I'd expect to get back the following IDs:

24
25

What I've tried:

I've done something this to get back the entries in third that aren't in first:

select t.* from third t where not exists (select * from first f where t.otherid = f.id);

and this will get me back the following rows:

ID  | OTHERID
24        4
25        5
26        6
27        7
28        8

Similarly, I can get the ones that aren't in second:

select t.* from third t where not exists (select * from second s where t.otherid = s.id);

and I'll get:

ID  | OTHERID
21        1
22        2
23        3
24        4
25        5

What I can't get my brain about this morning is how to combine the two queries together to get the intersection between the two results sets, so that just the rows with IDs 24 and 25 are returned. Those would be two rows I could remove since they are orphans.

How would you solve this? I think I'm on the right track but I'm just spinning at this point making no progress.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Maybe this :

SELECT third.*
FROM third
LEFT JOIN first ON third.otherID = first.id
LEFT JOIN second ON third.otherID = second.id
WHERE first.id IS NULL AND second.id IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Another way to solve it. –  itsmatt Jun 25 '10 at 14:10
    
@itsmatt: You should really consider using this one for better performance. MySQL5's optimizer is pretty lame when it comes to dependent sub-queries. –  Saggi Malachi Jun 25 '10 at 14:24

Just use

select t.*
from third t
where 
       not exists (select * from first f  where t.otherid = f.id)
  and  not exists (select * from second s where t.otherid = s.id)
share|improve this answer
    
@Lieven: Thanks. –  Aaron Digulla Jun 25 '10 at 13:52
    
Great, thanks! Frustrating that I was close and couldn't put 2 and 2 together on this. Chalk it up to a late Thursday :) –  itsmatt Jun 25 '10 at 14:10
2  
Using LEFT OUTER JOIN as suggested by Serty Oan would be much more efficient. Dependent sub-queries such as the ones used in the 'not exists' clauses will have to execute once per row while a LEFT OUTER JOIN query would only have to scan it once. (MySQL 5.x) –  Saggi Malachi Jun 25 '10 at 14:12
SELECT t.ID
FROM third t
WHERE t.OTHERID NOT IN (
    SELECT ID
    FROM first

    UNION

    SELECT ID
    FROM second
)
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1  
+1. This is how I'd write it but the not exists should perform better. (+1 on that one to btw :) –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 25 '10 at 13:50
    
oh thanks. I didn't know that NOT EXISTS performed better. –  SAGExSDX Jun 25 '10 at 14:03
    
Thanks! This worked too. –  itsmatt Jun 25 '10 at 14:10
    
@Lieven: In MySQL, LEFT JOIN/IS NULL is more efficient than NOT IN or NOT EXISTS (assuming no nulls) - see this article –  OMG Ponies Jun 25 '10 at 14:38
    
@OMG Ponies: I didn't know that. In SQL Server, I believe it is the other way around. Thank you. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 26 '10 at 7:26

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