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I want to implement the decorator pattern in Python, and I wondered if there is a way to write a decorator that just implements the function it wants to modify, without writing boiler-plate for all the functions that are just forwarded to the decorated object. Like so:

class foo(object):
    def f1(self):
        print "original f1"
    def f2(self):
        print "original f2"

class foo_decorator(object):
    def __init__(self, decoratee):
        self._decoratee = decoratee
    def f1(self):
        print "decorated f1"
        self._decoratee.f1()
    def f2(self):              # I would like to leave that part out
        self._decoratee.f2()

I would like to have calls to foo_decorator.f2 forwarded to decoratee.f2 automatically. Is there a way to write a generic method that forwards all unimplemented function-calls to decoratee?

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1  
Can you give a example where simply subclassing wouldnt work? You can subclass dynamically too - this pattern seems like a workaround for languages that can't do that or don't support multiple inheritage. –  Jochen Ritzel Jun 25 '10 at 15:26
    
I want to decorate objects at runtime. I want to apply different decorators to an object and be able to remove them again. Subclassing cannot change an instance after it has been created, or can it? –  Björn Pollex Jun 25 '10 at 15:50
    
If you have class A and change A, ie adding a new method, A.foo = lambda self: self this will reflect on all instances of A .. because everything is determined at runtime. Great way to produce absolutely unmaintainable code. –  Jochen Ritzel Jun 25 '10 at 17:01
3  
@THC4K: The decorator pattern (as opposed to python decorators) is used to add behavior to an object at runtime. This is actually very maintainable, when done correctly, which is why I posted this question. I wanted to find the way to this in Python. –  Björn Pollex Jun 26 '10 at 11:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You could use __getattr__:

class foo(object):
    def f1(self):
        print "original f1"
    def f2(self):
        print "original f2"

class foo_decorator(object):
    def __init__(self, decoratee):
        self._decoratee = decoratee
    def f1(self):
        print "decorated f1"
        self._decoratee.f1()
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return getattr(self._decoratee, name)

u = foo()
v = foo_decorator(u)
v.f1()
v.f2()
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1  
This is a great idea. It should be noted, however, that if you use Abstract Base Classes (ie import abc and use metaclass = abc.ABCMeta to define abstract methods and properties) then it will not work. –  abergou Feb 23 '12 at 18:28

As an addendum to Philipp's answer; if you need to not only decorate, but preserve the type of an object, Python allows you to subclass an instance at runtime:

class foo(object):
    def f1(self):
        print "original f1"

    def f2(self):
        print "original f2"


class foo_decorator(object):
    def __new__(cls, decoratee):
        cls = type('decorated',
                   (foo_decorator, decoratee.__class__),
                   decoratee.__dict__)
        return object.__new__(cls)

    def f1(self):
        print "decorated f1"
        super(foo_decorator, self).f1()


u = foo()
v = foo_decorator(u)
v.f1()
v.f2()
print 'isinstance(v, foo) ==', isinstance(v, foo)

This is a bit more involved than strictly necessary for your example, where you know the class being decorated in advance.

This might suffice:

class foo_decorator(foo):
    def __init__(self, decoratee):
        self.__dict__.update(decoratee.__dict__)

    def f1(self):
        print "decorated f1"
        super(foo_decorator, self).f1()
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It's arguably not the best practice, but you can add functionality to instances, as I've done to help transition my code from Django's ORM to SQLAlachemy, as follows:

def _save(self):
    session.add(self)
    session.commit()
setattr(Base,'save',_save)
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1  
I considered this as well, but it feels very wrong to me. Maybe that is because I come from C++? –  Björn Pollex Jun 25 '10 at 14:56
2  
It's fair to feel wrong about it. It could be considered monkey patching. However it works well with little code, it's a very different world with more possibilities from C when everything is dynamic & by reference. –  andyortlieb Jun 25 '10 at 15:16
    
I like it. For this example, anything else would just introduce more complexity IMO. –  Chomeh Mar 6 at 2:03

The UML diagram in the linked Wikipedia article is wrong and so is your code.

If you follow the "decorator pattern", the decorator class is derived from the base decorated class. (In the UML diagram an inheritance arrow from the WindowDecorator to Window is missing).

with

class foo_decorator(foo):

you don't need to implement undecorated methods.

BTW: In strong typed languages there is one more reason, why the decorator must be derived from the decorated class: Otherwise you wouldnt be able to chain decorators.

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The UML diagram shows both inheritance and aggregation (two essential parts for decorator pattern) of the base class. You inherit from the base class, so you look like the original, and you hold a reference to an instance of the base class where you can insulate access to it. The wikipedia article says this in steps 1 and 2: "(1) Subclass the original Component, (2) add a Component pointer as a field". So the original question is actually about Python duck typing, and neither about the decorator patter, nor Python decorators! –  maxpolk Dec 26 '14 at 19:51

To complement @Alec Thomas reply. I modified his answer to follow the decorator pattern. This way you don't need to know the class you're decorating in advance.

class Decorator(object):
    def __new__(cls, decoratee):
        cls = type('decorated',
                   (cls, decoratee.__class__),
                   decoratee.__dict__)
        return object.__new__(cls)

Then, you can use it as:

class SpecificDecorator(Decorator):
    def f1(self):
        print "decorated f1"
        super(foo_decorator, self).f1()

class Decorated(object):
    def f1(self):
        print "original f1"


d = SpecificDecorator(Decorated())
d.f1()
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