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We all know that premature optimization is the root of all evil because it leads to unreadable/unmaintainable code. Even worse is pessimization, when someone implements an "optimization" because they think it will be faster, but it ends up being slower, as well as being buggy, unmaintainable, etc. What is the most ridiculous example of this that you've seen?

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19  
"Pessimization" is a great word. –  mquander Mar 26 '09 at 17:31

42 Answers 42

up vote 64 down vote accepted

On an old project we inherited some (otherwise excellent) embedded systems programmers who had massive Z-8000 experience.

Our new environment was 32-bit Sparc Solaris.

One of the guys went and changed all ints to shorts to speed up our code, since grabbing 16 bits from RAM was quicker than grabbing 32 bits.

I had to write a demo program to show that grabbing 32-bit values on a 32-bit system was faster than grabbing 16-bit values, and explain that to grab a 16-bit value the CPU had to make a 32-bit wide memory access and then mask out or shift the bits not needed for the 16-bit value.

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14  
Hey where did you learn your math? 2 instructions with 1 cache/RAM access is obviously faster than 1 instruction with 1 cache/RAM access! –  Razor Storm Jun 24 '10 at 2:24
10  
@Razor - Statements like that make me realize I'm really in a nerd profession. –  orokusaki Nov 30 '10 at 6:05
while true; do echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches; sleep 3600; done

This caused the kernel to spend time clearing out disk cache, and once it succeeded, everything ran slowly until the cache got repopulated. Caused by a misapprehension that disk cache prevented memory from being available for applications to use.

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One company I visited as a consultant many years ago had written a sort function that looked something like this:

procedure sort(string[] values, string direction)
begin
  while not sorted do
  begin
    for every value in values
    begin
      if direction="Ascending" then
      begin
        ... swap values in ascending order
      end
      else if direction="Descending" then
      begin
        ... swap values in descending order
      end
    end;
  end;
end;

That is a bubblesort algorithm (which is inefficient in itself) with a string comparison for direction in the inner loop! I could hardly believe my eyes and explained that yes I can probably make a couple of speed improvements here (they were my clients after all so I had to be diplomatic about the fact that this was the most non-optimal code I've ever seen :-) )

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Databases are pessimization playland.

Favorites include:

  • Split a table into multiples (by date range, alphabetic range, etc.) because it's "too big".
  • Create an archive table for retired records, but continue to UNION it with the production table.
  • Duplicate entire databases by (division/customer/product/etc.)
  • Resist adding columns to an index because it makes it too big.
  • Create lots of summary tables because recalculating from raw data is too slow.
  • Create columns with subfields to save space.
  • Denormalize into fields-as-an-array.

That's off the top of my head.

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1  
Oh god, unioning with an archived table is painful. I've been the victim of that, so very not fun. –  Wedge Mar 26 '09 at 9:03
2  
Yes, I know someone who works for a big US oil company where nearly all their tables have an associated archive table, and most queries select from views that UNION the pairs of tables. Performance is as you would expect! –  Tony Andrews Mar 26 '09 at 13:32
11  
Duplicate entire database - check. –  David B Mar 27 '09 at 19:19
2  
I add: divide the database in several different databases (customers a-c, customers d-f, etc.) –  friol May 1 '09 at 8:13

Someone in my department once wrote a string class. An interface like CString, but without the Windows dependence.

One "optimization" they did was to not allocate any more memory than necessary. Apparently not realizing that the reason classes like std::string do allocate excess memory is so that a sequence of += operations can run in O(n) time.

Instead, every single += call forced a reallocation, which turned repeated appends into an O(n²) Schlemiel the Painter's algorithm.

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All foreign-key constraints were removed from a database, because otherwise there would be so many errors.

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In one of my first jobs as a full-fledged developer, I took over a project for a program that was suffering scaling issues. It would work reasonably well on small data sets, but would completely crash when given large quantities of data.

As I dug in, I found that the original programmer sought to speed things up by parallelizing the analysis - launching a new thread for each additional data source. However, he'd made a mistake in that all threads required a shared resource, on which they were deadlocking. Of course, all benefits of concurrency disappeared. Moreover it crashed most systems to launch 100+ threads only to have all but one of them lock. My beefy dev machine was an exception in that it churned through a 150-source dataset in around 6 hours.

So to fix it, I removed the multi-threading components and cleaned up the I/O. With no other changes, execution time on the 150-source dataset dropped below 10 minutes on my machine, and from infinity to under half an hour on the average company machine.

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How about POBI -- pessimization obviously by intent?

Collegue of mine in the 90s was tired of getting kicked in the ass by the CEO just because the CEO spent the first day of every ERP software (a custom one) release with locating performance issues in the new functionalities. Even if the new functionalities crunched gigabytes and made the impossible possible, he always found some detail, or even seemingly major issue, to whine upon. He believed to know a lot about programming and got his kicks by kicking programmer asses.

Due to the incompetent nature of the criticism (he was a CEO, not an IT guy), my collegue never managed to get it right. If you do not have a performance problem, you cannot eliminate it...

Until for one release, he put a lot of Delay (200) function calls (it was Delphi) into the new code. It took just 20 minutes after go-live, and he was ordered to appear in the CEO's office to fetch his overdue insults in person.

Only unusual thing so far was my collegues mute when he returned, smiling, joking, going out for a BigMac or two while he normally would kick tables, flame about the CEO and the company, and spend the rest of the day turned down to death.

Naturally, my collegue now rested for one or two days at his desk, improving his aiming skills in Quake -- then on the second or third day he deleted the Delay calls, rebuilt and released an "emergency patch" of which he spread the word that he had spent 2 days and 1 night to fix the performance holes.

This was the first (and only) time that evil CEO said "great job!" to him. That's all that counts, right?

This was real POBI.

But it also is a kind of social process optimization, so it's 100% ok.

I think.

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5  
I remember someone writing about a data processing app that was sold at different levels where the "Lite" could cruch only a few data sets per second, the "superduper" version thousands. The only source code difference being Sleep(N)'s. –  peterchen Jul 28 '10 at 21:53

I think the phrase "premature optimization is the root of all evil" is way, way over used. For many projects, it has become an excuse not to take performance into account until late in a project.

This phrase is often a crutch for people to avoid work. I see this phrase used when people should really say "Gee, we really didn't think of that up front and don't have time to deal with it now".

I've seen many more "ridiculous" examples of dumb performance problems than examples of problems introduced due to "pessimization"

  • Reading the same registry key thousands (or 10's of thousands) of times during program launch.
  • Loading the same DLL hundreds or thousands of times
  • Wasting mega bytes of memory by keeping full paths to files needlessly
  • Not organizing data structures so they take up way more memory than they need
  • Sizing all strings that store file names or paths to MAX_PATH
  • Gratuitous polling for thing that have events, callbacks or other notification mechanisms

What I think is a better statement is this: "optimization without measuring and understanding isn't optimization at all - its just random change".

Good Performance work is time consuming - often more so that the development of the feature or component itself.

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36  
"Premature" is the key word of that quote. Your rephrasing it to "optimization without measuring and understanding" doesn't seem to change the meaning one bit. That is precisely what Knuth meant. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 23 '08 at 3:52
12  
@Foredecker: right on. Too many people forget the context, which puts that quote solidly against micro-optimization. Analyzing a problem to pick the proper algorithm before implementing it isn't premature, yet too often that quote gets thrown up to justify the laziest, most inefficient solution. –  Shog9 Nov 23 '08 at 16:30
5  
It really depends on the individual case, there are more cases where premature optimization becomes a problem, than inadequate optimization planning becomes a problem –  Mark Rogers Mar 26 '09 at 17:40
10  
-1: There's a difference between "optimization" and proper design. For those who can't tell, a good rule of thumb is that an "optimization" makes the code tougher to read, but faster or more efficient. A better design will make the code easier to read (or at least no worse) and more efficient. –  T.E.D. Mar 26 '09 at 20:43
4  
If it's way overused, then the population asking questions on SO is heavily weighted toward the outliers. :D –  dkretz Mar 27 '09 at 21:41
var stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
stringBuilder.Append(myObj.a + myObj.b + myObj.c + myObj.d);
string cat = stringBuilder.ToString();

Best use of a StringBuilder I've ever seen.

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7  
Talk about "unclear on the concept"! Wow! –  Eddie Jul 6 '10 at 19:48
1  
Cool. "My lead says I have to use the StringBuilder class if I want to concatenate strings. That's what I do. So what's wrong?" Lol... –  TheBlastOne Aug 17 '10 at 9:01

I've got an intentional one... I've once implemented sorting through backtracking... just as a proof of concept ;)) needless to say its performance was horrific.

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I don't think pessimization is rare. From my experience doing performance tuning, a lot of the poor performance is caused by "good programming practice" justified in the name of "efficiency". Examples:

  • Map collections or "dictionaries"
    These usually make use of some kind of hash-coding, so they will have O(1) performance, but will only break even when filled with far more items than are typically used.

  • Iterators
    These are justified as being possibly optimized into efficient inline code, when it is seldom checked to see if they actually are.

  • Notifications and event handling as a way to keep data consistent
    Since data structure is seldom normalized, inconsistency must be managed, and notification is the usual method because it supposedly takes care of the problem "immediately". However, there is a big difference between immediacy and efficiency. Also "properties", when Get or Set, are encouraged to reach deep into the data structure to try to keep it consistent. These "short leash" methods can cause large amounts of wasted computation. "Long leash" methods, such as periodically cycling through the data structure to "repair" it, can be a little less "immediate" but much more efficient.

Examples

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The big all time number one which I run into time and time again in inhouse software:

Not using the features of the DBMS for "portability" reasons because "we might want to switch to another vendor later".

Read my lips. For any inhouse work: IT WILL NOT HAPPEN!

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9  
It does happen. MySQL -> postgresql, so we didn't lose anything. –  Thomas Jul 7 '09 at 10:56

Not exactly premature optimisation - but certainly misguided - this was read on the BBC website, from an article discussing Windows 7.

Mr Curran said that the Microsoft Windows team had been poring over every aspect of the operating system to make improvements. "We were able to shave 400 milliseconds off the shutdown time by slightly trimming the WAV file shutdown music.

Now, I haven't tried Windows 7 yet, so I might be wrong, but I'm willing to bet that there are other issues in there that are more important than how long it takes to shut-down. After all, once I see the 'Shutting down Windows' message, the monitor is turned off and I'm walking away - how does that 400 milliseconds benefit me?

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1  
I've lost plenty of hours in total waiting for XP VMs to shut down so that I can move on to the next thing. I'm very grateful for faster shutdown. –  James Jan 20 '10 at 19:27
1  
Interestingly, the WAV files are played asynchroneously, so as long as the shutdown fanfare is shorter than the time needed to shutdown, trimming the WAV file does nothing. And even more interestingly, if they optimized the shutdown soooo much, how comes every Windows box I shutdown need aeons until it really is down? (Except for using the big red button, of course.) –  TheBlastOne Jul 7 '10 at 7:34

Very late to this thread I know, but I saw this recently:

bool isFinished = GetIsFinished();

switch (isFinished)
{
    case true:
        DoFinish();
        break;

    case false:
        DoNextStep();
        break;

    default:
        DoNextStep();
}

Y'know, just in case a boolean had some extra values...

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1  
Must be a new boolean. True, False and other. –  Stradas May 21 '09 at 15:46
18  
True, False an FileNotFound ofcourse –  Ikke Jun 1 '09 at 10:55
17  
Oh, the code is ready for quantum computing! –  Codism Jul 6 '10 at 21:09
4  
Don't really see what this has to do with the question. –  UpTheCreek Jul 27 '10 at 13:20
1  
@Oorang I up-voted you because I thought you were kidding, then I saw the facepalm... –  Limited Atonement Jun 13 '13 at 17:11

Checking before EVERY javascript operation whether the object you are operating upon exists.

if (myObj) { //or its evil cousin, if (myObj != null) {
    label.text = myObj.value; 
    // we know label exists because it has already been 
    // checked in a big if block somewhere at the top
}

My problem with this type of code is nobody seems to care what if it doesn't exist? Just do nothing? Don't give the feedback to the user?

I agree that the Object expected errors are annoying, but this is not the best solution for that.

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A lot of programmers don't know or don't want to know SQL so they find "tricks" to avoid really using SQL so they can get the data into an array. Arrays make some people happy. (I love both cursors and arrays. Coke and Pepsi.) I have found these two blocks of code in a few object oriented programmers' code that complained that relational databases are slow. (the answer is not more memory or more processors.)

The table in this case is a huge table with the uniqueid_col is a unique id or a unique row.

Load this data into arrayX (because arrays must be faster)

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
 

(psuedo code)


Loop 
   arrayX.next_record
    if uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'
      return col2
    end if
end loop
 

(My answer is at bottom.)

This next one is a simple mistake I have also seen. The idea is you never get a duplicate this way:

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
 group by uniqueid_col, col2, col3
   having uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'

Correct syntax should be

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
    where uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'
   
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This doesn't exactly fit the question, but I'll mention it anyway a cautionary tale. I was working on a distributed app that was running slowly, and flew down to DC to sit in on a meeting primarily aimed at solving the problem. The project lead started to outline a re-architecture aimed at resolving the delay. I volunteered that I had taken some measurements over the weekend that isolated the bottleneck to a single method. It turned out there was a missing record on a local lookup, causing the application to have to go to a remote server on every transaction. By adding the record back to the local store, the delay was eliminated - problem solved. Note the re-architecture wouldn't have fixed the problem.

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I had a co-worker who was trying to outwit our C compiler's optimizer and routine rewrote code that only he could read. One of his favorite tricks was changing a readable method like (making up some code):

int some_method(int input1, int input2) {
    int x;
    if (input1 == -1) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (input1 == input2) {
        return input1;
    }
    ... a long expression here ...
    return x;
}

into this:

int some_method() {
    return (input == -1) ? 0 : (input1 == input2) ? input 1 :
           ... a long expression ...
           ... a long expression ...
           ... a long expression ...
}

That is, the first line of a once-readable method would become "return" and all other logic would be replace by deeply nested terniary expressions. When you tried to argue about how this was unmaintainable, he would point to the fact that the assembly output of his method was three or four assembly instructions shorter. It wasn't necessarily any faster but it was always a tiny bit shorter. This was an embedded system where memory usage occasionally did matter, but there were far easier optimizations that could have been made than this that would have left the code readable.

Then, after this, for some reason he decided that ptr->structElement was too unreadable, so he started changing all of these into (*ptr).structElement on the theory that it was more readable and faster as well.

Turning readable code into unreadable code for at the most a 1% improvement, and sometimes actually slower code.

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1  
@Michael: I wouldn't, unless there were measurements indicating that it was faster, not just shorter. –  dsimcha Aug 31 '10 at 2:47

I suppose I could offer this gem:

unsigned long isqrt(unsigned long value)
{
    unsigned long tmp = 1, root = 0;
    #define ISQRT_INNER(shift) \
    { \
        if (value >= (tmp = ((root << 1) + (1 << (shift))) << (shift))) \
        { \
            root += 1 << shift; \
            value -= tmp; \
        } \
    }

    // Find out how many bytes our value uses
    // so we don't do any uneeded work.
    if (value & 0xffff0000)
    {
        if ((value & 0xff000000) == 0)
            tmp = 3;
        else
            tmp = 4;
    }
    else if (value & 0x0000ff00)
        tmp = 2;

    switch (tmp)
    {
        case 4:
            ISQRT_INNER(15);
            ISQRT_INNER(14);
            ISQRT_INNER(13);
            ISQRT_INNER(12);
        case 3:
            ISQRT_INNER(11);
            ISQRT_INNER(10);
            ISQRT_INNER( 9);
            ISQRT_INNER( 8);
        case 2:
            ISQRT_INNER( 7);
            ISQRT_INNER( 6);
            ISQRT_INNER( 5);
            ISQRT_INNER( 4);
        case 1:
            ISQRT_INNER( 3);
            ISQRT_INNER( 2);
            ISQRT_INNER( 1);
            ISQRT_INNER( 0);
    }
#undef ISQRT_INNER
    return root;
}

Since the square-root was calculated at a very sensitive place, I got the task of looking into a way to make it faster. This small refactoring reduced the execution time by a third (for the combination of hardware and compiler used, YMMV):

unsigned long isqrt(unsigned long value)
{
    unsigned long tmp = 1, root = 0;
    #define ISQRT_INNER(shift) \
    { \
        if (value >= (tmp = ((root << 1) + (1 << (shift))) << (shift))) \
        { \
            root += 1 << shift; \
            value -= tmp; \
        } \
    }

    ISQRT_INNER (15);
    ISQRT_INNER (14);
    ISQRT_INNER (13);
    ISQRT_INNER (12);
    ISQRT_INNER (11);
    ISQRT_INNER (10);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 9);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 8);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 7);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 6);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 5);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 4);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 3);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 2);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 1);
    ISQRT_INNER ( 0);

#undef ISQRT_INNER
    return root;
}

Of course there are both faster AND better ways to do this, but I think it's a pretty neat example of a pessimization.

Edit: Come to think of it, the unrolled loop was actually also a neat pessimization. Digging though the version control, I can present the second stage of refactoring as well, which performed even better than the above:

unsigned long isqrt(unsigned long value)
{
    unsigned long tmp = 1 << 30, root = 0;

    while (tmp != 0)
    {
        if (value >= root + tmp) {
            value -= root + tmp;
            root += tmp << 1;
        }
        root >>= 1;
        tmp >>= 2;
    }

    return root;
}

This is exactly the same algorithm, albeit a slightly different implementation, so I suppose it qualifies.

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Another fancy performance trick :)

if (!loadFromDb().isEmpty) {
    resultList = loadFromDb();
    // do something with results
}

For a small price of extra DB hit, you save all that time doing like 10 lines of code, that probably wouldn't do much on an empty list anyway. And things like this were scattered all over the code :)

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One co-worker had to check access to the page for a specific role - "Admin" only. This is what she wrote:

.

if( CurrentUser.CurrentRole == "Role1" || CurrentUser.CurrentRole == "Role2")  
{
// Access denied
} 
else
{
// Access granted
}

instead of

if( !CurrentUser.CurrentRole.equals("Admin") ) 
{
 // access denied
}

So whenever a new role was added to the system, the new role had access to all confidential pages.


The same coworker was also joins for production and archive table for all queries.

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Some collegues of mine, that were on an "optimization" project of existing server side batches (written in C++), "optimized" to death the logging class (!), using win32-specific code and functions.

Maybe the bottleneck was in logger.write(...), who knows...

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Any significant optimization effort that isn't based on triaged reports from a profiler tool earns a big WTF from me.

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An application that used an Integer field to allocated bitwise which application access groupings our clients could add thier users to. That meant at the time we could create a grand total of 32 groups to be shared across all 500+ clients.

Aaaah, but a bitwise comparison is faster than an equals and waaay faster than a join right?

Unfortunately, when I completely (and rather vocally) freaked at this code and it's author, I discovered the author was my bosses boss. A rather authoritarian dude it turns out.

P.s.

I know what your are thinking, it totally should have been a binary string right? :)

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How about YAGNI extremism. It is a form of premature pessimization. It seems like anytime you apply YAGNI, then you end up needing it, resulting in 10 times the effort to add it than if you had added it in the beginning. If you create a successful program then odds are YOU ARE GOING TO NEED IT. If you are used to creating programs whose life runs out quickly then continue to practice YAGNI because then I suppose YAGNI.

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3  
Thank you, I'm sick of these lame 'extreme programming' acronyms and how people use them to support lazy, counter-productive practices. –  JAL Mar 29 '09 at 7:05

No one seems to have mentioned sorting, so I will.

Several different times, I've discovered that someone had hand-crafted a bubblesort, because the situation "didn't require" a call to the "too fancy" quicksort algorithm that already existed. The developer was satisified when their handcrafted bubblesort worked well enough on the ten rows of data that they're using for testing. It didn't go over quite as well after the customer had added a couple of thousand rows.

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1  
I did that myself once, when I determined that typically n=2. Later product enhancements invalidated my premise, and the code was replaced PDQ. –  Mark Ransom Apr 22 '09 at 19:10
1  
Yeah, but it's nice to write something algorythm based every now an then ;) –  UpTheCreek Jul 27 '10 at 13:22

Maybe just having a quick glance over the system early on will help point to the possible bottlenecks.

"This part doesnt need to be fast" (archiving logs) "This part must be hella fast" (accepting new connections)

Then the very fast parts usually dont need to be extra optimised with dirty quirks, usually decent hardware and well coded parts will suffice.

Just answering the simple question "Do I gain anything from having this part of code very fast?" will be a great guideline. I mean, using common sense optimises other parts of the project!

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I was going to mention StringBuilder for tiny/non-looping string concats, but its been mentioned.

Putting a method's variables into private class members to prevent them from getting "garbage collected every time the method runs." The variables are value types.

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I once had to attempt to modify code that included these gems in the Constants class

public static String COMMA_DELIMINATOR=",";
public static String COMMA_SPACE_DELIMINATOR=", ";
public static String COLIN_DELIMINATOR=":";

Each of these were used multiple times in the rest of the application for different purposes. COMMA_DELIMINATOR littered the code with over 200 uses in 8 different packages.

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9  
Also - Deliminator? I thought it was spelled 'delimiter'. Deliminator sounds like a bad mid-90s movie that somehow got 3 sequals........... –  BrightUmbra Mar 26 '09 at 19:13
47  
Deliminator III: Rise of the Commas –  Rob Mar 26 '09 at 19:19
27  
On another note, I'm pleased to see proper delimiting of Colins. Every programmer worth his salt knows that if there's one thing you absolutely must separate out properly, it's the damn Colins. –  Rob Mar 26 '09 at 19:20
2  
It's not that easy to do a proper find and replace. Since each one is used for different purposes. Any good programmer would have at least done something like this: COUNTRY_LIST_DELIM=... CLASSIFICATION_DELIM=... etc –  KitsuneYMG Mar 26 '09 at 20:56
3  
Terminator 1 is from the 80s, not the 90s –  Thomas Jul 7 '09 at 10:53

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