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We all know that premature optimization is the root of all evil because it leads to unreadable/unmaintainable code. Even worse is pessimization, when someone implements an "optimization" because they think it will be faster, but it ends up being slower, as well as being buggy, unmaintainable, etc. What is the most ridiculous example of this that you've seen?

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20  
"Pessimization" is a great word. –  mquander Mar 26 '09 at 17:31

42 Answers 42

Someone in my department once wrote a string class. An interface like CString, but without the Windows dependence.

One "optimization" they did was to not allocate any more memory than necessary. Apparently not realizing that the reason classes like std::string do allocate excess memory is so that a sequence of += operations can run in O(n) time.

Instead, every single += call forced a reallocation, which turned repeated appends into an O(n²) Schlemiel the Painter's algorithm.

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Another fancy performance trick :)

if (!loadFromDb().isEmpty) {
    resultList = loadFromDb();
    // do something with results
}

For a small price of extra DB hit, you save all that time doing like 10 lines of code, that probably wouldn't do much on an empty list anyway. And things like this were scattered all over the code :)

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I don't think pessimization is rare. From my experience doing performance tuning, a lot of the poor performance is caused by "good programming practice" justified in the name of "efficiency". Examples:

  • Map collections or "dictionaries"
    These usually make use of some kind of hash-coding, so they will have O(1) performance, but will only break even when filled with far more items than are typically used.

  • Iterators
    These are justified as being possibly optimized into efficient inline code, when it is seldom checked to see if they actually are.

  • Notifications and event handling as a way to keep data consistent
    Since data structure is seldom normalized, inconsistency must be managed, and notification is the usual method because it supposedly takes care of the problem "immediately". However, there is a big difference between immediacy and efficiency. Also "properties", when Get or Set, are encouraged to reach deep into the data structure to try to keep it consistent. These "short leash" methods can cause large amounts of wasted computation. "Long leash" methods, such as periodically cycling through the data structure to "repair" it, can be a little less "immediate" but much more efficient.

Examples

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while true; do echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches; sleep 3600; done

This caused the kernel to spend time clearing out disk cache, and once it succeeded, everything ran slowly until the cache got repopulated. Caused by a misapprehension that disk cache prevented memory from being available for applications to use.

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I was going to mention StringBuilder for tiny/non-looping string concats, but its been mentioned.

Putting a method's variables into private class members to prevent them from getting "garbage collected every time the method runs." The variables are value types.

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An application that used an Integer field to allocated bitwise which application access groupings our clients could add thier users to. That meant at the time we could create a grand total of 32 groups to be shared across all 500+ clients.

Aaaah, but a bitwise comparison is faster than an equals and waaay faster than a join right?

Unfortunately, when I completely (and rather vocally) freaked at this code and it's author, I discovered the author was my bosses boss. A rather authoritarian dude it turns out.

P.s.

I know what your are thinking, it totally should have been a binary string right? :)

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Some collegues of mine, that were on an "optimization" project of existing server side batches (written in C++), "optimized" to death the logging class (!), using win32-specific code and functions.

Maybe the bottleneck was in logger.write(...), who knows...

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One co-worker had to check access to the page for a specific role - "Admin" only. This is what she wrote:

.

if( CurrentUser.CurrentRole == "Role1" || CurrentUser.CurrentRole == "Role2")  
{
// Access denied
} 
else
{
// Access granted
}

instead of

if( !CurrentUser.CurrentRole.equals("Admin") ) 
{
 // access denied
}

So whenever a new role was added to the system, the new role had access to all confidential pages.


The same coworker was also joins for production and archive table for all queries.

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A lot of programmers don't know or don't want to know SQL so they find "tricks" to avoid really using SQL so they can get the data into an array. Arrays make some people happy. (I love both cursors and arrays. Coke and Pepsi.) I have found these two blocks of code in a few object oriented programmers' code that complained that relational databases are slow. (the answer is not more memory or more processors.)

The table in this case is a huge table with the uniqueid_col is a unique id or a unique row.

Load this data into arrayX (because arrays must be faster)

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
 

(psuedo code)


Loop 
   arrayX.next_record
    if uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'
      return col2
    end if
end loop
 

(My answer is at bottom.)

This next one is a simple mistake I have also seen. The idea is you never get a duplicate this way:

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
 group by uniqueid_col, col2, col3
   having uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'

Correct syntax should be

   Select uniqueid_col, col2, col3
     from super_big_tbl
    where uniqueid_col = '829-39-3984'
   
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One company I visited as a consultant many years ago had written a sort function that looked something like this:

procedure sort(string[] values, string direction)
begin
  while not sorted do
  begin
    for every value in values
    begin
      if direction="Ascending" then
      begin
        ... swap values in ascending order
      end
      else if direction="Descending" then
      begin
        ... swap values in descending order
      end
    end;
  end;
end;

That is a bubblesort algorithm (which is inefficient in itself) with a string comparison for direction in the inner loop! I could hardly believe my eyes and explained that yes I can probably make a couple of speed improvements here (they were my clients after all so I had to be diplomatic about the fact that this was the most non-optimal code I've ever seen :-) )

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Any significant optimization effort that isn't based on triaged reports from a profiler tool earns a big WTF from me.

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I've got an intentional one... I've once implemented sorting through backtracking... just as a proof of concept ;)) needless to say its performance was horrific.

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