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I am attempting to write a Perl script that parses a log where on each line the second value is the date. The script takes in three arguments: the input log file, the start time, and the end time. The start and end time are used to parse out a certain value on each line that that falls between those two times. But to properly run this I am converting the start and end time to epoch time. The problem I am having is that to convert the loops 'i' value back to normal time to compare against the log file. After running localtime($i) I print the value and only see a reference printed not the actual value.

Here is the script I have so far (it is a work in progress):

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::Local;
use Time::localtime;
use File::stat;

my $sec = 0;
my $min = 0;
my $hour = 0;
my $mday = 0;
my $mon = 0;
my $year = 0;
my $wday = 0;
my $yday = 0;
my $isdst = 0;

##########################
# Get the engine log date
##########################
my $date = `grep -m 1 'Metric' "$ARGV[0]" | awk '{print \$2}'`;
($year,$mon,$mday) = split('-', $date);
$mon--;

#########################################
# Calculate the start and end epoch time
#########################################
($hour,$min,$sec) = split(':', $ARGV[1]);
my $startTime = timelocal($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year);
($hour,$min,$sec) = split(':', $ARGV[2]);
my $endTime = timelocal($sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year);


my $theTime = 0;
for (my $i = $startTime; $i <= $endTime + 29; $i++) {
        #print "$startTime   $i \n";

        $theTime = localtime($i);

        #my $DBInstance0 = `grep "$hour:$min:$sec" "$ARGV[0]"`;# | grep 'DBInstance-0' | awk '{print \$9}'`;
        #print "$DBInstance0\n";
        print "$theTime\n";
}
print "$startTime   $endTime \n";

The output looks like:

Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbbd40)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc1a0)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbbe80)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc190)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8bbb170)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc180)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbbf30)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc170)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc210)
Time::tm=ARRAY(0x8cbc160)
1275760356   1275760773

I only have access to the core Perl modules and am unable to install any others.

share|improve this question
2  
@Matt: in that case I recommend submitting your resume to careers.stackoverflow.com. –  Ether Jun 25 '10 at 20:23
2  
@Ether,@Peter - some people work for companies larger than a start-up, where the win of using untested code is WAY larger than a value at risk from using it. When you lose billions from buggy code, your perspective changes to be a bit more red-tapey. So being rude to someone on that basis is not only not helping you win Perl converts, it is also downright unfair. –  DVK Jun 25 '10 at 20:59
4  
@Ether - I'm not assuming that. I'm assuming that the "just use it and ask forgiveness later" might be an acceptable attitude at a small company - for a good or bad reason - but is generally, for a good reason, NOT and acceptable one in a large company, despite the opinion of individual developers on the topic and my liking of the cowboy ways personally –  DVK Jun 25 '10 at 21:18
3  
Also, the kneejerk reaction of "find another job" often seen on SO Perl tag is way off base IMHO. Ability to do whatever-you-feel-needed-and-damn-the-consequences is not always the overriding reason people want to work for a specific company, and rarely the major one. –  DVK Jun 25 '10 at 21:23
5  
Let me explain why I can't use untested code. I work for one of the largest exchanges in the world. If I use a module that is untested and it causes someone to lose millions or billions of dollars, there is no forgiveness. We practice such "paranoia" because so much can be lost and possibly put a number of countries into a depression. DVK is correct that not everyone can "just use it and ask forgiveness later". And I love my job even though I can only use the core Perl modules. It does make my job more difficult until the modules are tested, but that is fine with me. –  Matt Pascoe Jun 25 '10 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use ctime, depending on your definition of "Normal time":

Example code:

use Time::Local; 
use Time::localtime; 
my $time=timelocal(1,2,3,24,6,2010);
print "$time\n"; 
$theTime = ctime($time); 
print "$theTime\n";

Result:

1279954921
Sat Jul 24 03:02:01 2010

Also, you don't need to use Time::Localtime (which is why you get Time::tm instead of a standard array/string from Perl's internal localtime):

use Time::Local; 
my $time=timelocal(1,2,3,24,6,2010); 
print "$time\n"; 
$theTime = localtime($time); 
print "$theTime\n";

1279954921
Sat Jul 24 03:02:01 2010
share|improve this answer

Don't forget to subtract 1900 from the year!

Remember that in scalar context, localtime and gmtime returns a ctime-formatted string, so you could use it as in the following. If that's unsuitable, you might want to use strftime from the POSIX module.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

use Time::Local;

my $start = "01:02:03";
my $end   = "01:02:05";
my $date  = "2010-02-10";

my($year,$mon,$mday) = split /-/, $date;
$mon--;
$year -= 1900;

my($startTime,$endTime) =
  map { my($hour,$min,$sec) = split /:/;
        timelocal $sec,$min,$hour,$mday,$mon,$year }
  $start, $end;

for (my $i = $startTime; $i <= $endTime + 29; $i++) {
  print scalar localtime($i), "\n";
}

print "$startTime   $endTime \n";

Tail of the output:

Wed Feb 10 01:02:26 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:27 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:28 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:29 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:30 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:31 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:32 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:33 2010
Wed Feb 10 01:02:34 2010
1265785323   1265785325
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