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Do Android have any way to instantiate objects without calling any of its constructors?

In Java, Sun have sun.reflect.ReflectionFactory.getReflectionFactory().newConstructorForSerialization(), in .Net we have System.Runtime.Serialization.FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject() but I was not able to find anything like that in the Android platform.

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I'd be really curious to hear what the use case is for something like that. –  Rich Jun 25 '10 at 21:18
    
@Rich, My sentiment exactly. –  Anthony Forloney Jun 25 '10 at 21:19
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Is your goal to deserialize so to speak objects that only have non empty constructors? This is an interesting request. –  Quintin Robinson Jun 25 '10 at 21:21
    
@Rich,Anthony, The reason is the same as the Serialization infrastructure. I work in a oodb and as soon as we instantiate the object we set its fields so calling constructors is at least waste of time/resources. In the worst cases we may have no viable constructor to use (all available constructors may throw when called with null/default values for its parameters) –  Vagaus Jun 25 '10 at 21:24
    
@Quintin Robinson: basically we don't care if the class has any constructor at all. If possible it'd be better to just bypass calling any constructor. –  Vagaus Jun 25 '10 at 21:26
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

After looking into Android source code we found a way to achieve this by using ObjectInputStream#newInstance() static method.

private Object newInstanceSkippingConstructor(final Class clazz) throws SecurityException, NoSuchMethodException, IllegalArgumentException, IllegalAccessException,     InvocationTargetException {

    Method newInstance = ObjectInputStream.class.getDeclaredMethod("newInstance", Class.class, Class.class);
    newInstance.setAccessible(true);
    return newInstance.invoke(null, clazz, Object.class);

}
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You can do this from native code with the JNI AllocObject function. See the JNI Spec. Calling out to native code is going to be more expensive than calling a no-op constructor, but probably cheaper than calling a constructor that throws an exception.

I don't know if there's another way to do it. Nothing is leaping out at me.

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I don't believe so, however the Android platform does contain the Java Reflection API in java.lang.reflect.* so anything that is possible using the Java Reflection API is possible in Android

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Indeed, I noticed that package but as I said, I could not find anything to achieve my goal :( –  Vagaus Jun 25 '10 at 21:34
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