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I already have a deploy.rb that can deploy my app on my production server.

My app contains a custom rake task (a .rake file in the lib/tasks directory).

I'd like to create a cap task that will remotely run that rake task.

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1  
Can someone explain the pros/cons of using capistrano's own #{rake} variable? Seems it's not always the best option. –  lulalala Nov 7 '12 at 3:13
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13 Answers

a little bit more explicit:
in your \config\deploy.rb, add outside any task or namespace:

namespace :rake do  
  desc "Run a task on a remote server."  
  # run like: cap staging rake:invoke task=a_certain_task  
  task :invoke do  
    run("cd #{deploy_to}/current; /usr/bin/env rake #{ENV['task']} RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env}")  
  end  
end

Then, from /rails_root/, you can run:

cap staging rake:invoke task=rebuild_table_abc
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1  
better to use /usr/bin/env rake so rvm setups will pick up the correct rake. –  DGM Nov 4 '10 at 20:30
5  
With 'bundle exec' if available –  Bogdan Gusiev Mar 18 '11 at 14:20
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up vote 36 down vote accepted
run("cd #{deploy_to}/current && /usr/bin/env rake `<task_name>` RAILS_ENV=production")

Found it with Google -- http://ananelson.com/said/on/2007/12/30/remote-rake-tasks-with-capistrano/

The RAILS_ENV=production was a gotcha -- I didn't think of it at first and couldn't figure out why the task wasn't doing anything.

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A minor improvement: if you replace the semicolon with && then the second statement (running the rake task) will not run if the first statement (changing the directory) fails. –  Teflon Ted May 12 '09 at 15:17
2  
This won't work if you are deploying to multiple servers. It will run the rake task multiple times. –  Mark Redding Jun 3 '11 at 20:36
3  
one should really respect capistrano's rake setting "cd #{deploy_to}/current && #{rake} <task_name> RAILS_ENV=production" –  kares Jun 14 '11 at 11:13
    
@Mark Redding: Could you put one of the servers in its own role for rake tasks and restrict your capistrano task to only run on servers with that role? –  mj1531 Jun 24 '11 at 15:25
    
I did something where I created a task in my deploy.rb. That task has a :roles => :db on it such that it will only execute on the same server which i defined as my primary for db:migrate. –  Mark Redding Nov 26 '11 at 20:38
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Use Capistrano-style rake invocations

There's a common way that'll "just work" with require 'bundler/capistrano' and other extensions that modify rake. This will also work with pre-production environments if you're using multistage. The gist? Use config vars if you can.

desc "Run the super-awesome rake task"
task :super_awesome do
  rake = fetch(:rake, 'rake')
  rails_env = fetch(:rails_env, 'production')

  run "cd '#{current_path}' && #{rake} super_awesome RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env}"
end
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This is the nicest solution, uses the capistrano values where available –  loopj Jul 14 '12 at 23:28
2  
Probably worth adding that if your task is namespaced (i.e. defined not in the top level namespace) you might have to use top.run instead of just run –  dolzenko Oct 2 '13 at 14:02
    
Thanks @dolzenko. Just found the docs for the top method. In the case where we've defined run in the same namespace, top.run is required, otherwise it should still find the top-level run even where the task is namespaced. Have I missed something? What happened in your case? –  CaptainPete Oct 3 '13 at 1:34
1  
I clearly didn't have any run method defined in the same namespace, so not sure why I needed that. In any case Capistrano 2.0 is a history and the next version is Rake based (making things more predictable hopefully) –  dolzenko Oct 30 '13 at 8:42
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I personally use in production a helper method like this:

def run_rake(task, options={}, &block)
  command = "cd #{latest_release} && /usr/bin/env bundle exec rake #{task}"
  run(command, options, &block)
end

That allows to run rake task similar to using the run (command) method.


NOTE: It is similar to what Duke proposed, but I:

  • use latest_release instead of current_release - from my experience it is more what you expect when running a rake command;
  • follow the naming convention of Rake and Capistrano (instead of: cmd -> task and rake -> run_rake)
  • don't set RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env} because the right place to set it is the default_run_options variable. E.g default_run_options[:env] = {'RAILS_ENV' => 'production'} # -> DRY!
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There's an interesting gem cape that makes your rake tasks available as Capistrano tasks, so you can run them remotely. cape is well documented, but here's a short overview on how to set i up.

After installing the gem, just add this to your config/deploy.rb file.

# config/deploy.rb
require 'cape'
Cape do
  # Create Capistrano recipes for all Rake tasks.
  mirror_rake_tasks
end

Now, you can run all you rake tasks locally or remotely through cap.

As an added bonus, cape lets you set how you want to run your rake task locally and remotely (no more bundle exec rake), just add this to your config/deploy.rb file:

# Configure Cape to execute Rake via Bundler, both locally and remotely.
Cape.local_rake_executable  = '/usr/bin/env bundle exec rake'
Cape.remote_rake_executable = '/usr/bin/env bundle exec rake'
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...couple of years later...

Have a look at capistrano's rails plugin, you can see at https://github.com/capistrano/rails/blob/master/lib/capistrano/tasks/migrations.rake#L5-L14 it can look something like:

desc 'Runs rake db:migrate if migrations are set'
task :migrate => [:set_rails_env] do
  on primary fetch(:migration_role) do
    within release_path do
      with rails_env: fetch(:rails_env) do
        execute :rake, "db:migrate"
      end
    end
  end
end
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This is for capistrano v3, only. –  phillbaker Jan 21 at 13:01
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Capistrano 3 Generic Version (run any rake task)

Building a generic version of Mirek Rusin's answer:

desc 'Invoke a rake command on the remote server'
task :invoke, [:command] => 'deploy:set_rails_env' do |task, args|
  on primary(:app) do
    within current_path do
      with :rails_env => fetch(:rails_env) do
        rake args[:command]
      end
    end
  end
end

Example usage: cap staging invoke[db:migrate]

Note that deploy:set_rails_env requires comes from the capistrano-rails gem

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thanks for providing :) –  Hannes Apr 3 at 19:24
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Here's what I put in my deploy.rb to simplify running rake tasks. It's a simple wrapper around capistrano's run() method.

def rake(cmd, options={}, &block)
  command = "cd #{current_release} && /usr/bin/env bundle exec rake #{cmd} RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env}"
  run(command, options, &block)
end

Then I just run any rake task like so:

rake 'app:compile:jammit'
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this conflicts as capistrano defines it's own rake variable (used to determine which rake to use) and thus breaks built in receipies for instance the one which precompiles assets –  Michael Oct 17 '12 at 11:57
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namespace :rake_task do
  task :invoke do
    if ENV['COMMAND'].to_s.strip == ''
      puts "USAGE: cap rake_task:invoke COMMAND='db:migrate'" 
    else
      run "cd #{current_path} && RAILS_ENV=production rake #{ENV['COMMAND']}"
    end
  end                           
end 
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Good. Changing it from RAILS_ENV=production to RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env} allows it to work on my staging server as well. –  evanrmurphy Mar 20 '13 at 21:33
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This also works:

run("cd #{release_path}/current && /usr/bin/rake <rake_task_name>", :env => {'RAILS_ENV' => rails_env})

More info: Capistrano Run

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{deploy_to}/current won't work here. The symbolic link has not changed. If you update the rake task , this will run old code. Consider using {release_path} instead. –  Mark Redding Jun 3 '11 at 20:35
    
thanks @MarkRedding, updated to reflect your suggestion –  acw Nov 25 '11 at 8:59
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Most of it is from above answer with a minor enhancement to run any rake task from capistrano

Run any rake task from capistrano

$ cap rake -s rake_task=$rake_task

# Capfile     
task :rake do
  rake = fetch(:rake, 'rake')
  rails_env = fetch(:rails_env, 'production')

  run "cd '#{current_path}' && #{rake} #{rake_task} RAILS_ENV=#{rails_env}"
end
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If the Rake task requires user interaction, it will not work

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I have no idea how capistrano works, but just for the record -- this is the syntax to invoke a rake task from Ruby:

Rake::Task["task:name"].invoke
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Why was this downvoted? –  Benjamin Oakes Jun 29 '10 at 13:29
1  
I didn't downvote you but it's probably because that doesn't work within Capistrano. –  rfunduk Jul 27 '10 at 19:15
    
This will invoke the rake task on the machine capistrano is invoke, not the target machine. –  Philippe Rathé Nov 22 '11 at 21:01
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