Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm learning Perl and noticed a rather peculiar quirk -- attempting to match one of multiple regex conditions in a while loop results in that loop going on for infinity:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my $hivar = "this or that";

while ($hivar =~ m/this/ig || $hivar =~ m/that/ig) {
        print "$&\n";
}

The output of this program is:

this
that
that
that
that
[...]

I'm wondering why this is? Are there any workarounds that are less clumsy than this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

my $hivar = "this or that";

while ($hivar =~ m/this|that/ig) {
        print "$&\n";
}

This is a simplification of a real-world problem I am encountering, and while I am interested in this in a practical standpoint, I also would like to know what behind-the-scenes is triggering this behavior. This is a question that doesn't seem to be very Google-compatible.

Thanks!

Tom

share|improve this question
    
hobbes explained it quite well below, but so do Wall, Schwartz, et al.: perldoc.perl.org/perlretut.html#Global-matching –  msw Jun 26 '10 at 4:29
    
You might want to look here to see if the Regexp::Assemble package can help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/1478083/… –  Joe Casadonte Jun 26 '10 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The thing is that there's a hidden value associated with each string, not with each match, that controls where a /g match will attempt to continue, and accessible through pos($string). What happens is:

  1. pos($hivar) is 0, /this/ matches at position 0 and resets pos($hivar) to 4. The second match isn't attempted because the or operator is already true. $& becomes "this" and gets printed.
  2. pos($hivar) is 4, /this/ fails to match because there's no "this" at position 4 or beyond. The failing match resets pos($hivar) to 0.
  3. /that/ matches at position 6 and resets pos($hivar) to 10. $& becomes "that" and gets printed.
  4. pos($hivar) is 10, /this/ fails to match because there's no "this" at position 10 or beyond. The failing match resets pos($hivar) to 0.
  5. /that/ matches at position 6 and resets pos($hivar) to 10. $& becomes "that" and gets printed.

and steps 4 and 5 repeat indefinitely.

Adding the c regex flag (which tells the engine not to reset pos on a failed match) solves the problem in the example code you provided, but it might or might not be the ideal solution to a more complex problem.

share|improve this answer
2  
really well explainned, cookie for u. –  Prix Jun 26 '10 at 4:28
    
Indeed. Well put. Thank you! –  Tom Corelis Jun 26 '10 at 23:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.