Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been playing around with Haskell a fair bit, including practising writing functions in point-free form. Here is an example function:

dotProduct :: (Num a) => [a] -> [a] -> a
dotProduct xs ys = sum (zipWith (*) xs ys)

I would like to write this function in point-free form. Here is an example I found elsewhere:

dotProduct = (sum .) . zipWith (*)

However, I don't understand why the point-free form looks like (sum .) . zipWith (*) instead of sum . zipWith (*). Why is sum in brackets and have 2 composition operators?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted
dotProduct xs ys = sum (zipWith (*) xs ys)             -- # definition

dotProduct xs    = \ys -> sum (zipWith (*) xs ys)      -- # f x = g <=> f = \x -> g
                 = \ys -> (sum . (zipWith (*) xs)) ys  -- # f (g x) == (f . g) x
                 = sum . (zipWith (*) xs)              -- # \x -> f x == f
                 = sum . zipWith (*) xs                -- # Precedence rule

dotProduct       = \xs -> sum . zipWith (*) xs         -- # f x = g <=> f = \x -> g
                 = \xs -> (sum .) (zipWith (*) xs)     -- # f * g == (f *) g
                 = \xs -> ((sum .) . zipWith (*)) xs   -- # f (g x) == (f . g) x
                 = (sum .) . zipWith (*)               -- # \x -> f x == f

The (sum .) is a section. It is defined as

(sum .) f = sum . f

Any binary operators can be written like this, e.g. map (7 -) [1,2,3] == [7-1, 7-2, 7-3].

share|improve this answer
    
Is the * in this part f * g == (f *) g the same as the . function composition? –  guhou Jun 26 '10 at 12:18
    
@Bleu: Yes. Any binary operators will do. –  KennyTM Jun 26 '10 at 12:32

KennyTM's answer is excellent, but still I'd like to offer another perspective:

dotProduct = (.) (.) (.) sum (zipWith (*))
  • (.) f g applies f on the result of g given one argument
  • (.) (.) (.) f g applies f on the result of g given two arguments
  • (.) (.) ((.) (.) (.)) f g applies f on the result of g given three arguments
  • ...
  • Can do (.~) = (.) (.) (.), (.~~) = (.) (.) (.~), (.~~~) = (.) (.) (.~~) and now let foo a b c d = [1..5]; (.~~~) sum foo 0 0 0 0 results in 15.
    • But I wouldn't do it. It will probably make code unreadable. Just be point-full.
  • Conal's TypeCompose provides a synonym for (.) called result. Perhaps this name is more helpful for understanding what's going on.
    • fmap also works instead of (.), if importing the relevant instances (import Control.Applicative would do it) but its type is more general and thus perhaps more confusing.
  • Conal's concept of "fusion" (not to be confused with other usages of "fusion") is kind of related and imho offers a nice way to compose functions. More details in this long Google Tech Talk that Conal gave
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! I'm still pretty new with Haskell, so some of this looks..arcane.. but learning about different approaches is helpful too :) –  guhou Jun 26 '10 at 12:57
2  
The (.) (.) (.) case is common and straightforward enough that I sometimes create a (...) operator for it. Beyond that, though, it's probably time to be pointful. –  C. A. McCann Jun 26 '10 at 16:36
1  
too bad .. is taken :D –  Thomas Eding Jun 27 '10 at 5:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.