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I learned that auto-variables aren't initialized to zero. So the following code will behave correctly and prints random numbers on the screen:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void doSomething()
{
  int i;
  cout << i << endl;
}

int main()
{
  doSomething();
}

But why won't this snipped behave in the same way ?

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void doSomething()
{
  int i;
  cout << i << endl;
}

int main()
{
  int j;
  cout << j << endl;
  doSomething();
}

This snippet shows:

0
0

Does anyone know why "j" and "i" were suddenly initialized to zero here?

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7  
you are assigning special significance to the number 0 - it's still undefined, it just happens to be 0! –  Paul Dixon Jun 26 '10 at 13:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using an uninitialized variable is undefined behaviour. It's likely you wouldn't get the same behaviour on another compiler. The only 'why' is to be found inside the source code to your specific C++ compiler.

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that's true! I tried it out on a different machine and the code behaved correctly. –  Mike Dooley Jun 26 '10 at 13:50
    
well, it is an incorrect answer though, Stroustrup is in accordance with section 8.5 of the C++ standard (ISO-IEC 14882-2003) –  nus Jun 26 '10 at 13:56
    
Actually, the "why" often has little to do with the compiler. The value will typically be whatever was left there by whatever executed previously, or whatever the OS put there if the memory is newly allocated (the latter will often be zero for security reasons). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 26 '10 at 14:30
    
@Mike: The function will behave "correctly" even if it prints out 0 every time. You cannot rely on the number being "random". –  Bill Jun 26 '10 at 16:15
    
@ufotds: Huh? Section 8.5 discusses declarators initializers. The cited code has no initializers. Ergo undefined behaviour, unless the Standard is even more arcane than I thought! Which can never be ruled out... @Mike: @Bill is right. Your code has no correct behaviour. @Jerry: of course the O/S matters - but I'd say the exact code the compiler emits is pretty much the factor to check first. Take compiler flags to always zero out or 0xDEADBEEF storage, f'rinstance. –  Pontus Gagge Jun 26 '10 at 16:59

If an initializer is specified for an object, that initializer determines the initial value of an object. If no initializer is specified, a global (§4.9.4), namespace (§8.2), or local static object (§7.1.2, §10.2.4) (collectively called static objects) is initialized to 0 of the appropriate type.

For example:

// Global scope

int    a; // means ‘‘int    a = 0  ;’’
double d; // means ‘‘double d = 0.0;’’

Local variables (sometimes called automatic objects) and objects created on the free store (sometimes called dynamic objects or heap objects) are not initialized by default.

For example:

void f()
{
   int x; // x does not have a well defined value
   // ...
}

From Stroustrup, The C++ Programming Language, 3rd edition, p.83 - §4.9.5

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Er... I don't know if you're jocking, but it's exactly the opposite... ---EDIT--- Ok, you edited and now it's correct. –  Matteo Italia Jun 26 '10 at 13:43
    
sorry, my memory is a sieve sometimes, corrected now. I know, it took me the full 2 minutes to look it up. –  nus Jun 26 '10 at 13:46
    
OK, that's what you were after. I' taking the liberty of adding a '// Global scope' comment to your first example, them. –  Pontus Gagge Jun 26 '10 at 17:01

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