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Calculate the longest path between two nodes.
The path is in an arch.
Signature of method is:

public static int longestPath(Node n)

In the example binary tree below, it is 4 (going thru 2-3-13-5-2).

This is what I have right now and for the given tree it just returns 0.

public static int longestPath(Node n) {
    if (n != null) {
        longestPath(n, 0);
    }
    return 0;
}
private static int longestPath(Node n, int prevNodePath) {

    if (n != null && n.getLeftSon() != null && n.getRightSon() != null) {
        int currNodePath = countLeftNodes(n.getLeftSon()) + countRightNodes(n.getRightSon());
        int leftLongestPath = countLeftNodes(n.getLeftSon().getLeftSon()) + countRightNodes(n.getLeftSon().getRightSon());
        int rightLongestPath = countLeftNodes(n.getRightSon().getLeftSon()) + countRightNodes(n.getRightSon().getRightSon());

        int longestPath = currNodePath > leftLongestPath ? currNodePath : leftLongestPath;
        longestPath = longestPath > rightLongestPath ? longestPath : rightLongestPath;

        longestPath(n.getLeftSon(), longestPath);
        longestPath(n.getRightSon(), longestPath);

        return longestPath > prevNodePath ? longestPath : prevNodePath;
    }
    return 0;
}
private static int countLeftNodes(Node n) {
    if (n != null) {
        return 1+ countLeftNodes(n.getLeftSon());
    }
    return 0;
}
private static int countRightNodes(Node n) {
    if (n != null) {
        return 1+ countRightNodes(n.getRightSon());
    }
    return 0;
}

I understand that I'm missing a key concept somewhere... My brain goes crazy when I try tracking the flow of execution...
Am I right by saying that by finding the longest path among the root, its left & right nodes and then recurse on its left & right nodes passing them the longest path from previous method invocation and finally (when?) return the longest path, I'm not certain as to how you go about returning it...

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How do you handle the case where the binary tree is essentially a linked list? For example, 2-3-13 (13 is the root, 3 is left of 13, and 2 is left of 3). Should the result be 2? –  Daniel Trebbien Jun 26 '10 at 21:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Maybe it is just as simple:

public static int longestPath(Node n) {
    if (n != null) {
        return longestPath(n, 0); // forgot return?
    }
    return 0;
}

Its more complicated than one might think at first sight. Consider the following tree:

      1
     / \
    2   3
   / \
  4   5
 / \   \
6   7   8
   / \   \
  9   a   b

In this case, the root node is not even in the longest path (a-7-4-2-5-8-b).

So, what you must do is the following: For each node n you must compute the following:

  • compute longest path in left subtree starting with the root of the left subtree (called L)
  • compute longest path in right subtree starting with the root of the right subtree (called R)
  • compute the longest path in left subtree (not necessarily starting with the root of the left subtree) (called l)
  • compute the longest path in right subtree (not necessarily starting with the root of the right subtree) (called r)

Then, decide, which combination maximizes path length:

  • L+R+2, i.e. going from a subpath in left subtree to current node and from current node through a subpath in right subtree
  • l, i.e. just take the left subtree and exclude the current node (and thus right subtree) from path
  • r, i.e. just take the right subtree and exclude the current node (and thus left subtree) from path

So I would do a little hack and for every node not return just a single int, but a triple of integers containing (L+R+2, l, r). The caller then must decide what to do with this result according to the above rules.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I tried and it just returns zero. As for me forgetting to add the return, I added it and it did return 4, but it only accounts for the arch extending from the root node... other archs longer than it were simply ignored. –  timeNomad Jun 26 '10 at 16:33
    
+1 Good corner case demonstration –  Jamie Wong Jun 26 '10 at 16:52
    
Actually, the longest path is 6 (e.g.: a-7-4-2-5-8-b). This is a good example, though. –  Daniel Trebbien Jun 26 '10 at 16:58
    
@Daniel Hmmm the way I understood it the path is of the shape of an arch (upside down V). –  timeNomad Jun 26 '10 at 17:06
    
Yap, corrected. –  phimuemue Jun 26 '10 at 17:06

A correct algorithm is:

  1. Run DFS from any node to find the farthest leaf node. Label that node T.
  2. Run another DFS to find the farthest node from T.
  3. The path you found in step 2 is the longest path in the tree.

This algorithm will definitely work, and you're not limited to just binary trees either. I'm not sure about your algorithm:

Am I right by saying that by finding the longest path among the root, its left & right nodes and then recurse on its left & right nodes passing them the longest path from previous method invocation and finally (when???) return the longest path, I'm not certain as to how you go about returning it...

because I don't understand what exactly you're describing. Can you work it by hand on an example or try to explain it better? That way you might get better help understanding if it's correct or not.

You seem to be attempting a recursive implementation of basically the same thing just simplified for binary trees. Your code seems rather complicated for this problem however. Check the discussion here for a simpler implementation.

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Concerning beeing not limited to just binary trees: Have a look at: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_path_problem This states, that the problem (at least for arbitrary graphs) is np-complete. –  phimuemue Jun 26 '10 at 17:13
    
@phimuemue - yes, I mean as long as the graph is still a tree. –  IVlad Jun 26 '10 at 17:17
    
+1: This correctly finds the longest path in an undirected tree (I suppose it is also the diameter in case of trees). –  Aryabhatta Jun 27 '10 at 8:38
    
1. Find a loop. 2. Enter it. 3. ... 4. Profit! –  badp Jun 27 '10 at 12:49
1  
1. Find a loop in a tree. 2. Sell amazing tree with loops to newbie graph theorists. 3. Profit. –  Aryabhatta Jun 27 '10 at 14:02
public int longestPath() {
    int[] result = longestPath(root);
    return result[0] > result[1] ? result[0] : result[1];
}

// int[] {self-contained, root-to-leaf}
private int[] longestPath(BinaryTreeNode n) {
    if (n == null) {
        return new int[] { 0, 0 };
    }
    int[] left = longestPath(n.left);
    int[] right = longestPath(n.right);

    return new int[] { Util.max(left[0], right[0], left[1] + right[1] + 1),
            Util.max(left[1], right[1]) + 1 };
}
share|improve this answer
    
The OP is asking for an explanation, not just code. –  Austin Henley Sep 25 '12 at 2:32

Simple Implementation:

int maxDepth(Node root) {
    if(root == null) {
        return 0;
    } else {
        int ldepth = maxDepth(root.left);
        int rdepth = maxDepth(root.right);
        return ldepth>rdepth ? ldepth+1 : rdepth+1;
    }
}

int longestPath(Node root)
{
   if (root == null)
     return 0;

  int ldepth = maxDepth(root.left);
  int rdepth = maxDepth(root.right);

  int lLongPath = longestPath(root.left);
  int rLongPath = longestPath(root.right);

  return max(ldepth + rdepth + 1, max(lLongPath, rLongPath));
}
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This would be o(n^2) . There should be a better solution of o(n) –  Dejel Apr 10 '13 at 6:51

Here is my recursive solution in C++:

int longest_dis(Node* root) {
    int height1, height2;

    if( root==NULL)
        return 0;

    if( root->left == NULL ) && ( root->right == NULL )
        return 0;

    height1 = height(root->left); // height(Node* node) returns the height of a tree rooted at node
    height2 = height(root->right);

    if( root->left != NULL ) && ( root->right == NULL )
        return max(height1+1, longest_dis(root->left) );

    if( root->left == NULL ) && ( root->right != NULL )
        return max(height2+1, longest_dis(root->right) );

    return max(height1+height2+2, longest_dis(root->left), longestdis(root->right) );
}
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I think You are overcomplicating things.

Think about the longest path that goes through the node n and doesn't go up to the parent of n. What is the relationship between the length of that path and the heights of both subtries connected to n?

After figuring that out, check the tree recursively reasoning like this:

The longest path for a subtree with the root n is the longest path of the following three:

  1. The longest path in the subtree, whose root is n.left_child
  2. The longest path in the subtree, whose root is n.right_child
  3. The longest path, that goes through the node n and doesn't go up to the parent of n
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What if, for each node n, your goal was to compute these two numbers:

  • f(n): The length of the longest path in the tree rooted at n
  • h(n): The height of the tree that is rooted at n.

For each terminal node (nodes having null left and right nodes), it is obvious that f and h are both 0.

Now, the h of each node n is:

  • 0 if n.left and n.right are both null
  • 1 + h(n.left) if only n.left is non-null
  • 1 + h(n.right) if only n.right is non-null
  • 1 + max(h(n.left), h(n.right)) if both n.left and n.right are non-null

And f(n) is:

  • 0 if n.left and n.right are both null
  • max(f(n.left), h(n)) if only n.left is non-null
  • ?? if only n.right is non-null
  • ?? if both n.left and n.right are non-null

(You need to figure out what replaces the two "??" placeholders. There are choices that make this strategy work. I have tested it personally.)

Then, longestPath(Node n) is just f(n):

public class SO3124566
{
    static class Node
    {
        Node left, right;

        public Node()
        {
            this(null, null);
        }

        public Node(Node left, Node right)
        {
            this.left = left;
            this.right = right;
        }
    }

    static int h(Node n)
    {
        // ...
    }

    static int f(Node n)
    {
        // ...
    }

    public static int longestPath(Node n)
    {
        return f(n);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        { // @phimuemue's example
            Node n6 = new Node(),
                n9 = new Node(),
                a = new Node(),
                n7 = new Node(n9, a),
                n4 = new Node(n6, n7),
                b = new Node(),
                n8 = new Node(null, b),
                n5 = new Node(null, n8),
                n2 = new Node(n4, n5),
                n3 = new Node(),
                n1 = new Node(n2, n3);
            assert(longestPath(n1) == 6);
        }{ // @Daniel Trebbien's example: http://pastebin.org/360444
            Node k = new Node(),
                j = new Node(k, null),
                g = new Node(),
                h = new Node(),
                f = new Node(g, h),
                e = new Node(f, null),
                d = new Node(e, null),
                c = new Node(d, null),
                i = new Node(),
                b = new Node(c, i),
                a = new Node(j, b);
            assert(longestPath(a) == 8);
        }



        assert(false); // just to make sure that assertions are enabled.
            // An `AssertionError` is expected on the previous line only.
    }
}

You should be able to write recursive implementations of f and h to make this code work; however, this solution is horribly inefficient. Its purpose is just to understand the calculation.

To improve the efficiency, you could use memoization or convert this to a non-recursive calculation that uses stack(s).

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Well, umm if I've understood your question correctly, here is my solution [but in C++(I'm sorry)]:

int h(const Node<T> *root)
{
    if (!root)
        return 0;
    else
        return max(1+h(root->left), 1+h(root->right));
}

void longestPath(const Node<T> *root, int &max)
{
    if (!root)
        return;
    int current = h(root->left) + h(root->right) + 1;
    if (current > max) {
        max = current;
    }
    longestPath(root->left, max);
    longestPath(root->right, max);
}

int longest()
{
    int max = 0;
    longestPath(root, max);
    return max;
}
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Taking into account @phimuemue example and @IVlad solution, I decided to check it out myself, so here is my implementation of @IVlad solution in python:

def longestPath(graph,start, path=[]):
    nodes = {}
    path=path+[start]
    for node in graph[start]:
        if node not in path:
            deepestNode,maxdepth,maxpath = longestPath(graph,node,path)
            nodes[node] = (deepestNode,maxdepth,maxpath)
    maxdepth = -1
    deepestNode = start
    maxpath = []
    for k,v in nodes.iteritems():
        if v[1] > maxdepth:
            deepestNode = v[0]
            maxdepth = v[1]
            maxpath = v[2]
    return deepestNode,maxdepth +1,maxpath+[start]

if __name__ == '__main__':
    graph = { '1' : ['2','3'],
              '2' : ['1','4','5'],
              '3' : ['1'],
              '4' : ['2','6','7'],
              '5' : ['2','8'],
              '6' : ['4'],
              '7' : ['4','9','a'],
              '8' : ['5','b'],
              '9' : ['7'],
              'a' : ['7'],
              'b' : ['8']
    }
    """
          1
         / \
        2   3
       / \
      4   5
     / \   \
    6   7   8
       / \   \
      9   a   b
    """
    deepestNode,maxdepth,maxpath = longestPath(graph,'1')
    print longestPath(graph, deepestNode)

>>> ('9', 6, ['9', '7', '4', '2', '5', '8', 'b'])
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