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I have a SQL script that creates users in in my database. It uses the .Net membership stored procs.

At this point it works fine.

The only issue is that the passwords are saved clear text. What should I change here to they are salted/encrypted (Not sure what term to use here)

GO

DECLARE @return_value int,
  @UserId uniqueidentifier


EXEC @return_value = [dbo].[aspnet_Membership_CreateUser]
  @ApplicationName = N'Theater',
  @UserName = N'sam.sosa',
  @Password = N'mypassword',
  @PasswordSalt = N'eyhKDP858wdrYHbBmFoQ6DXzFE1FB+RDP4ULrpoZXt6f',
  @Email = N'sam@Simple.com',
  @PasswordQuestion = N'Whats your favorite color',
  @PasswordAnswer = N'Fusia',
  @IsApproved = 1,
  @CurrentTimeUtc = '2010-03-03',
  @CreateDate = '2010-03-03',
  @UniqueEmail = 1,
  @PasswordFormat = 0,
  @UserId = @UserId OUTPUT

SELECT @UserId as N'@UserId'

SELECT 'Return Value' = @return_value

GO

thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use the membership API but instead you run the SQL? –  František Žiačik Jun 26 '10 at 17:31
    
I need to run a sql statement for environment reasons –  aron Jun 26 '10 at 18:10
    
Which version of SQL are you using? 2005, 2008 or R2? –  hwiechers Jun 30 '10 at 18:12
    
SQL 2008 Web Edition r2 –  aron Jul 1 '10 at 20:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted
+50

Under the hood it looks like for the "Hashed" password storage mode, it simply calculates:

SHA1(Salt + Password)

The Salt is stored Base64 encoded, so it must be decoded prior to being concatenated with the (Unicode) password. Finally, the result is Base64 encoded for storage.

The following (horrible) SQL will output a suitably encoded value which can be substituted in place of the "mypassword" that you currently have. You must also set @PasswordFormat to 1 to indicate that the password is stored hashed.

declare @salt nvarchar(128)
declare @password varbinary(256)
declare @input varbinary(512)
declare @hash varchar(64)

-- Change these values (@salt should be Base64 encoded)
set @salt = N'eyhKDP858wdrYHbBmFoQ6DXzFE1FB+RDP4ULrpoZXt6f'
set @password = convert(varbinary(256),N'mypassword')

set @input = hashbytes('sha1',cast('' as  xml).value('xs:base64Binary(sql:variable(''@salt''))','varbinary(256)') + @password)
set @hash = cast('' as xml).value('xs:base64Binary(xs:hexBinary(sql:variable(''@input'')))','varchar(64)')

-- @hash now contains a suitable password hash
-- Now create the user using the value of @salt as the salt, and the value of @hash as the password (with the @PasswordFormat set to 1)

DECLARE @return_value int, 
  @UserId uniqueidentifier 

EXEC @return_value = [dbo].[aspnet_Membership_CreateUser] 
  @ApplicationName = N'Theater', 
  @UserName = N'sam.sosa', 
  @Password = @hash, 
  @PasswordSalt = @salt, 
  @Email = N'sam@Simple.com', 
  @PasswordQuestion = N'Whats your favorite color', 
  @PasswordAnswer = N'Fusia', 
  @IsApproved = 1, 
  @CurrentTimeUtc = '2010-03-03', 
  @CreateDate = '2010-03-03', 
  @UniqueEmail = 1, 
  @PasswordFormat = 1, 
  @UserId = @UserId OUTPUT 

SELECT @UserId as N'@UserId' 

SELECT 'Return Value' = @return_value 
share|improve this answer
    
Iridium, thanks, but how do I include this in the sql statement above? –  aron Jul 2 '10 at 2:04
    
I've amended my code to incorporate the password hashing with your original SQL. –  Iridium Jul 2 '10 at 7:20
    
Sweet! Thanks! works well! Side note: if the user later changes their password the new password is also "salted" when viewed in the tb_Memberships table –  aron Jul 2 '10 at 11:01
    
This is great, but any idea how something like this could be done in SQL 2000? Yeah, I know... –  Raelshark Dec 17 '10 at 22:47

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