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I have met the following code in Scheme:

(define x! 
  (lambda(x)
    (if (= x 1) 1 (* x (x! (- x 1))))))

(define fact x!)

(define x! (lambda (x) x))
(fact 5)

Everything is clear for me until re-defining x! and seeing the result of the function (20). How can it be explained?.. Why is it 20 and not 5!= 120. Thanks in advance

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The way Scheme behaves when you have a redefinition of an identifier is to use set! for it. In your case, if you replace the redefinition with

(set! x! (lambda (x) x))

then the result will become clearer.

(Note that this is not something that all schemes do...)

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what do you mean "not something all schemes do"? –  newacct Jun 26 '10 at 21:54
    
Thank you for the answers! Now it is clear! –  anna-k Jun 27 '10 at 4:49
    
@newacct: Eli is referring to implementations. I think he means: (Note that not all scheme implementations will use set! instead of define in the case of a redefinition) –  Cam Jun 27 '10 at 5:27
    
newacct: It's close to what incrediman said -- in some implementations -- mostly ones where you write code in modules, define is only creating a new definition, not mutating an existing one. –  Eli Barzilay Jun 27 '10 at 18:16
    
it's defined in the scheme standards. see schemers.org/Documents/Standards/R5RS/HTML/… –  newacct Jun 28 '10 at 0:38

first you define x! to be the way to compute factorial (i.e. (x! 5) = 120).
Then you define fact to be what x! is, which is the same function (i.e. fact = lambda(x) (if (= x 1)... Then you change what x! is the identity. However, fact is still that same function, you didn't change it, but that function references x! internally, so it ends up calling fact (which is the first thing you defined) which calls the identity function.

so (fact 5) is the same as:

(if (= 5 1) 1 (* 5 (x! (- 5 1))))))

which is the same as:

(if false 1 (* 5 (x! 4)))

which is the same as:

(if false 1 (* 5 4))

which is the same as:

(* 5 4)

which is 20

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3  
Note that in standard scheme you use #f, not false. –  Eli Barzilay Jun 26 '10 at 21:12

Here's what's happening:

When you (define fact x!), you aren't permanently linking fact to x!. You're making fact equal to whatever x! is at the time of fact's definition.

So (define fact x!) is actually equivalent to:

(define fact
  (lambda(x)
    (if (= x 1) 1 (* x (x! (- x 1))))))

Next, you redefine x!:

(define x! (lambda (x) x))

But that does not change fact - it only changes x!. Next, you do this:

(fact 5)

Here's what the interpreter 'does' next (it may actually do it slightly differently - but only trivially so, and this should at least help you understand the behaviour of your program):

Replacing fact with its definition gives:

(lambda(x)
    (if (= x 1) 1 (* x (x! (- x 1)))))

Replacing x! with its new definition gives:

((lambda(x)
   (if (= x 1)
       1
       (* x 
          (- ((lambda (x)
                x)
              x)
             1))))
 5)

...Simplifying gives:

((lambda(x)
   (if (= x 1)
       1
       (* x (- x 1))))
 5)

...

(if (= 5 1)
    1
    (* 5 (- 5 1)))

...

(if #f
    1
    (* 5 (- 5 1)))

...Resolving the conditional and simplifying the substraction gives:

(* 5 4)

...Which yields 20.

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Ok, what happens here is the following:

When you do (x! (- x 1)) inside the original definition of x!, you're calling the function named x!. So if you change what the name x! means, that will affect this call to x!.

When you do (define fact x!) fact doesn't refer to the name x!, but to the current contents of x!, i.e. the function you just defined.

Now you change the meaning of the name x! and then call (fact 5). This will first invoke the original definition of x! (because that's what fact refers to), however when it gets to the call (x! (- 5 1)), it invokes the new definition of x!, which returns 4, so you get 5*4 = 20.

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1  
"change the meaning of the name x!" is actually much simpler than it looks: this meaning is whatever value it points to, and this value is mutated in this example. –  Eli Barzilay Jun 26 '10 at 21:11
    
@EliBarzilay: If the value was mutated that would also affect fact which points to the same value, wouldn't it? –  sepp2k Jun 26 '10 at 22:03
    
sepp2k: No, the value itself is not mutated, which is why fact stays the same. Instead, it's the x! binding that gets mutated. –  Eli Barzilay Jun 27 '10 at 18:18

One side note: You need to use an environment model to figure it out.Because the answer of questions like that differs in lexical scoping versus dynamic scoping.

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