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How can I add to a field in a Table built in Oracle database a time?

ex: I want to add the value 13:00:00 to the field Time in a table named Data

How can this be done?

I`m using Oracle 10g Express Edition

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Hi sikas, you'll need to learn the difference between storing a date/time, and displaying a date/time. When you query a table with dates or timestamps, it converts the internal date/time values into a string format for display. If you don't explicitly specify the format using the TO_CHAR function, Oracle automatically picks the format based on the session's NLS_DATE_FORMAT setting. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 28 '10 at 4:51

1 Answer 1

If this is one of the DATE field formats then for a record insert you would:

insert 
  into "DATA" ("TIME")
  values (to_date('13:00:00', 'HH24:MI:SS'));

You can verify this with:

select to_char("TIME", 'HH24:MI:SS')
from "DATA";
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this is not I was asking ... I don`t know what changed the title of the question, I re-edited it. I want to add time value to new row for example, I want to add the clock (1 PM) in the format HH:MM:SS to a column in a new row. –  sikas Jun 26 '10 at 21:42
    
What is the format of the "TIME" field? Can you do a "DESCRIBE <TABLENAME>" for me? –  REW Jun 26 '10 at 21:48
    
This is the SQL Command of my table: CREATE table "Schedule" ( "SID" NVARCHAR2(9) NOT NULL, "Code" NVARCHAR2(6) NOT NULL, "Room" NVARCHAR2(4) NOT NULL, "Day" NVARCHAR2(9) NOT NULL, "Time_From" TIMESTAMP NOT NULL, "Time_To" TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ) –  sikas Jun 26 '10 at 21:58
    
the type I`m working with is the TIMESTAMP –  sikas Jun 26 '10 at 21:59
    
insert into "DATA" ("TIME") values (to_date('13:00:00','HH24:MI:SS')); this didn`t work. when I select the data from the table DATA all what I see is this data 01-JUN-10 –  sikas Jun 26 '10 at 22:10

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