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Sorry for the duplicaiton, but I've been googlin' for hours now without any result.

I have this (optimized) data of a simple cube exported from a converter:

// 8 Verticies
// 4 Texture Coordinates
// 6 Normals
// 12 Triangles

static GLshort cubeFace_indicies[12][9] = {
    // Box001
    {2,0,3 ,0,0,0 ,0,1,2 }, {1,3,0 ,0,0,0 ,3,2,1 }, {5,4,7 ,1,1,1 ,1,3,0 },
    {6,7,4 ,1,1,1 ,2,0,3 }, {1,0,5 ,2,2,2 ,1,3,0 }, {4,5,0 ,2,2,2 ,2,0,3 },
    {3,1,7 ,3,3,3 ,1,3,0 }, {5,7,1 ,3,3,3 ,2,0,3 }, {2,3,6 ,4,4,4 ,1,3,0 },
    {7,6,3 ,4,4,4 ,2,0,3 }, {0,2,4 ,5,5,5 ,1,3,0 }, {6,4,2 ,5,5,5 ,2,0,3 }
};
static GLfloat cubeVertices [8][3] = {
    {-100.0f,-100.0f,-100.0f},{100.0f,-100.0f,-100.0f},{-100.0f,100.0f,-100.0f},
    {100.0f,100.0f,-100.0f},{-100.0f,-100.0f,100.0f},{100.0f,-100.0f,100.0f},
    {-100.0f,100.0f,100.0f},{100.0f,100.0f,100.0f}
};
static GLfloat cubeNormals [6][3] = {
    {0.0f,0.0f,1.0f},{0.0f,0.0f,-1.0f},{0.0f,1.0f,0.0f},
    {-1.0f,0.0f,0.0f},{0.0f,-1.0f,0.0f},{1.0f,0.0f,0.0f}
};
static GLfloat cubeTextures [4][2] = {
    {1.0f,2.0f},{1.0f,1.0f},{0.0f,2.0f},
    {0.0f,1.0f}
};

I have a texture set up, and I want to see something on the screen. My recent drawing code below:

glTexCoordPointer(2, GL_FLOAT, 0, cubeTextures);
glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, cubeVertices);
glNormalPointer(GL_FLOAT, 0, cubeNormals);
glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D, textures[0]);

    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES , 12, GL_SHORT, cubeFace_indicies);
share|improve this question
    
And of course it doesn't work. – Geri Jun 26 '10 at 23:50
    
what glEnable() calls have you made? – Anders K. Jun 27 '10 at 0:40
    
glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D); glEnable(GL_BLEND); glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST); – Geri Jun 27 '10 at 12:22
    
Whats the problem? – Geri Jun 27 '10 at 12:23
    
Ya, and the necessary glEnableClientState functions of course. – Geri Jun 27 '10 at 12:50
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Index data in OpenGL ES (and regular OpenGL) doesn’t work the way you’re using it. Rather than providing separate indices per vertex for the position, normal, and texture coordinate, you provide a single index i, and OpenGL ES takes element i from each of the enabled vertex arrays. This means that you’ll need separate indices for all the vertex-normal-texcoord combinations you’ve created in your current representation, which may require duplicating your data a bit.

You might be able to get away with specifying fewer unique points if your model can be drawn with flat shading (i.e. calling glShadeModel(GL_FLAT) before drawing). In that case, the normal from the last vertex in a triangle will be used for the entire triangle. This requires careful ordering of your indices, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to make it clear. But if it is true, then why do 3D Exploring exports arrays like this? Just cannot understand. Anyway, PolyTrans exports in the way you described it, and it is works of course well. – Geri Jul 2 '10 at 17:27

to use glDrawArrays you must enable the GL_VERTEX_ARRAY state with glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY) and then create each vertex point with glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 0, )

share|improve this answer
    
I mistyped the title. The question is on glDrawElements, now I've updated. – Geri Jun 27 '10 at 0:19

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