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How do I format my string in GWT?

I made a method

  Formatter format = new Formatter();
    int matches = 0;
    Formatter formattedString = format.format("%d numbers(s, args) in correct position", matches);
    return formattedString.toString();

But it complains by saying

Validating newly compiled units
   [ERROR] Errors in 'file:/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/kkshetri/workspace/MasterMind/MasterMind/src/com/kunjan/MasterMind/client/MasterMind.java'
      [ERROR] Line 84: No source code is available for type java.util.Formatter; did you forget to inherit a required module?

Isn't Formatter included?

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did u import java.util.Formatter in your MasterMind.java file? –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Jun 27 '10 at 3:12

11 Answers 11

up vote 18 down vote accepted

UPDATE: Please see (and vote up) Joseph Lust's post below before looking further at this answer.

Looks like formatter isn't included according to this post. However, they suggest some alternatives.

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5  
Worth mentioning are also NumberFormat and DateTimeFormat. –  Igor Klimer Jun 27 '10 at 7:28
    
My IDE complains that NumberFormat is not present in JRE emulation but it seems to work... –  dhardy Jun 10 '13 at 9:51
    
This was the real, legit GWT Solution for me. [as referenced by @Joseph Lust answer below which I think should be the real accepted answer..] –  cellepo Aug 12 '13 at 21:42

See the official page on GWT date and number formatting.

They suggest the following:

myNum decimal = 33.23232;
myString = NumberFormat.getFormat("#.00").format(decimal);

It is best to use their supported, optimized methods, than to cook up your own non-optimal method. Their compiler will be optimizing them all to nearly the same thing anyway in the end.

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A very simple replacement for String.format() in GWT 2.1+:

import com.google.gwt.regexp.shared.RegExp;
import com.google.gwt.regexp.shared.SplitResult;

public static String format(final String format, final Object... args) {
  final RegExp regex = RegExp.compile("%[a-z]");
  final SplitResult split = regex.split(format);
  final StringBuffer msg = new StringBuffer();
  for (int pos = 0; pos < split.length() - 1; ++pos) {
    msg.append(split.get(pos));
    msg.append(args[pos].toString());
  }
  msg.append(split.get(split.length() - 1));
  return msg.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

Or even simpler, not using RegExp, and using only Strings:

public static String format(final String format, final String... args) {
    String[] split = format.split("%s");
    final StringBuffer msg = new StringBuffer();
    for (int pos = 0; pos < split.length - 1; pos += 1) {
        msg.append(split[pos]);
        msg.append(args[pos]);
    }
    msg.append(split[split.length - 1]);
    return msg.toString();
 }
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1  
pos += 1 in a for loop? Really? –  Travis Webb Jul 11 '12 at 21:28
1  
+1 for not using the google package. This has a problem if the format ends in %s. Just add if(args.length == split.length) msg.append(args[args.length - 1]); before the return to fix it. –  Ignacio Valdivieso Aug 22 '12 at 16:04

This one is pretty fast and ignores bad curly-delimited values:

public static String format(final String format, final Object... args)
{
    if (format == null || format.isEmpty()) return "";

    // Approximate the result length: format string + 16 character args
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(format.length() + (args.length*16));

    final char openDelim = '{';
    final char closeDelim = '}';

    int cur = 0;
    int len = format.length();
    int open;
    int close;

    while (cur < len)
    {
        switch (open = format.indexOf(openDelim, cur))
        {
            case -1:
                return sb.append(format.substring(cur, len)).toString();

            default:
                sb.append(format.substring(cur, open));
                switch (close = format.indexOf(closeDelim, open))
                {
                    case -1:
                        return sb.append(format.substring(open)).toString();

                    default:
                        String nStr = format.substring(open + 1, close);
                        try
                        {
                            // Append the corresponding argument value
                            sb.append(args[Integer.parseInt(nStr)]);
                        }
                        catch (Exception e)
                        {
                            // Append the curlies and the original delimited value
                            sb.append(openDelim).append(nStr).append(closeDelim);
                        }
                        cur = close + 1;
                }
        }
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
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I'm not keen on abusing string manipulation for doing regexps' job, but, based on bodrin's solution, you can code:

public static String format (String pattern, final Object ... args) {
    for (Object arg : args) {
        String part1 = pattern.substring(0,pattern.indexOf('{'));
        String part2 = pattern.substring(pattern.indexOf('}') + 1);
        pattern = part1 + arg + part2;
    }   
    return pattern;
}
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1  
Something scares me about modifying your parameter in your method. –  Ryan Shillington Sep 20 '12 at 3:44
    
@RyanShillington String is immutable. –  NateS Apr 29 at 11:35

Another suggestion which makes use of JSNI and a nice JavaScript format function from another post:

import com.google.gwt.core.client.JsArrayString;

public abstract class StringFormatter {
    public static String format(final String format, final Object... args) {
        if (null == args || 0 == args.length)
            return format;
        JsArrayString array = newArray();
        for (Object arg : args) {
            array.push(String.valueOf(arg)); // TODO: smarter conversion?
        }
        return nativeFormat(format, array);
    }

    private static native JsArrayString newArray()/*-{
        return [];
    }-*/;

    private static native String nativeFormat(final String format, final JsArrayString args)/*-{
        return format.replace(/{(\d+)}/g, function(match, number) {
            return typeof args[number] != 'undefined' ? args[number] : match;
        });
    }-*/;
}

One can then make a call like this:

StringFormatter.format("Greetings {0}, it's {1} o'clock, which is a {2} statement", "Master", 8, false);

...with the result being

Greetings Master, it's 8 o'clock, which is a false statement

There is a potential to improve further at the TODO comment, e.g. utilise NumberFormat. Suggestions are welcome.

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As an alternative you can use class NumberFormat:

NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getDecimalFormat();
double value = 12345.6789;
String formatted = fmt.format(value);
// Prints 1,2345.6789 in the default locale
share|improve this answer

another very very simple replacement for java.text.MessageFormat.format() :

public static String format(final String format, final Object... args) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    int cur = 0;
    int len = format.length();
    while (cur < len) {
        int fi = format.indexOf('{', cur);
        if (fi != -1) {
            sb.append(format.substring(cur, fi));
            int si = format.indexOf('}', fi);
            if (si != -1) {
                String nStr = format.substring(fi + 1, si);
                int i = Integer.parseInt(nStr);
                sb.append(args[i]);
                cur = si + 1;
            } else {
                sb.append(format.substring(fi));
                break;
            }
        } else {
            sb.append(format.substring(cur, len));
            break;
        }
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
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Maybe the easiest way to do something like String.format, can be do it with a String.replace, for instance;

instead of do String.format("Hello %s", "Daniel"); ==> "Hello %s".replace("%s", "Daniel"),

both give us the same result, but just the second way works in GWT client side

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1  
If you're going to use formatting, you will likely need more than one parameter, so the blind replace of "%s" is not actually a solution. –  bogdan.mustiata Apr 26 '13 at 8:05

As mentionned above, there is GWT formatters for numbers and dates : NumberFormat and DateTimeFormat. Still, I needed a solution for the well-know String.format(...) case. I end up with this solution, I don't know if it's wrong for performance, but it's visually clean. I'd be glad to hear any comment on it, or about other solution.

My String formatter :

public class Strings {

    public static String format(final String format, final Object... args) {
        String retVal = format;
        for (final Object current : args) {
            retVal = retVal.replaceFirst("[%][s]", current.toString());
        }
        return retVal;
    }

}

and the JUTest if one want to re-use this :

public class StringsTest {

    @Test
    public final void testFormat() {
        this.assertFormat("Some test here  %s.", 54);
        this.assertFormat("Some test here %s and there %s, and test [%s].  sfsfs !!!", 54, 59, "HAHA");

    }

    private void assertFormat(final String format, final Object... args) {
        Assert.assertEquals("Formatting is not working", String.format(format, args), Strings.format(format, args));
    }

}
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